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Leo656
10-18-2013, 10:32 PM
If this has been done before, it's probably been a while and I probably missed out, so sorry about that. But anyway, I was just wondering: What are some of your favorite comic book stories, and why? What made those stories stand out to you? It doesn't have to be super-heroes, since a lot of people here don't seem to strictly read super-hero comics. I'll throw out a few to get started:

Superman:
-"The Man Of Steel": Still my favorite look at the Superman origin (although Geoff Johns did a great job with "Secret Origin", my second favorite take on it). John Byrne managed to streamline 50 years of mythology into a tidy 6-issue mini-series that established all the important facts and characters and made everything fresh for the 1980s and beyond. There really was no need for it to be tinkered with ever since, other than Mark Waid insisting he could do it better with "Birthright", and he did the opposite of good there, actually screwing up large chunks of the mythology that had been established prior and accidentally laying the seeds for his *own* origin to be retconned just a few years later by Johns's book. Change just for change's sake is almost always bad; this Superman origin got it right and to me will always be "The Real One."

-"Death and Return of Superman": You can't just read the Death part and leave it there, because that was only the set-up. "Funeral For A Friend" was brilliant and memorable, with lots of truly sad and emotional moments throughout, and "Reign of the Supermen", while a bit too action-heavy near the end where you could tell the writers were just rushing to get it over with and Superman back to "normal", is still a great action story despite its flaws and was especially great in that it brought Superman back from the dead without doing anything hokey or "cheating", like everyone had expected. Everything from Clark dying in Lois's arms, to Bibbo asking God how Superman could be dead while a "poor schlub" like Bibbo was still alive, to Clark and Pa Kent travelling through "The Other Side" together and Clark having to choose life or death, to the revelation of the villain, to the battles between the four "Supermen", to Superman's return and final moment of triumph, had such impact on an emotional level as well as the visceral. Plus, the creation of modern-day Superboy as a bonus. Taken together I think this year and a half-long storyline was the greatest Superman story ever told.

Batman:
-"The Killing Joke": The definitive Joker origin story. DC likes to claim it may not be "true" and just some made-up Joker bullsh*t (in the story he claims not to really remember how he came to be), but that's just because the editors hope one day, someone will come along and tell the story better. They won't.

-"A Death In The Family": Spiritually a sequel to "Killing Joke", as it happens shortly after and references those events. After rejecting Batman's offer of rehabilitation in TKJ, Joker seemingly becomes worse than ever in a killing spree that spans the globe, almost causes a nuclear holocaust, and results in the death of Jason Todd, the second Robin, one of the most historically important events in the history of Batman comics. Almost every Batman story for the next 15 years made some reference to events from this story, that's how important it was.

-"A Lonely Place Of Dying": Often overlooked because it didn't get a ton of press hype (coming off the red-hot "Death In The Family" story), but it was vital in showing Batman's mental collapse following Robin's death, and historically important because it foreshadowed what would come next for several major characters. Operating recklessly, brutally, and seemingly trying to get himself killed, Batman has to come to terms with his grief and guilt while Two-Face returns to Gotham more sadistic and damaged than ever. Steps are taken to reconcile Bruce and Nightwing's relationship, and Tim Drake, who would later become the third Robin, is introduced.

The Flash:
-"The Return Of Barry Allen": Wally West, the third Flash, has always struggled to live up to his beloved uncle Barry Allen's legacy and his own guilt following his death. So what happens when his hero Barry returns, and not only resumes his role as "The REAL Flash", but seemingly wants to erase anything Wally ever accomplished on his own? Was his hero worship misguided from the start, or is "Barry" not what he seems? When it inevitably comes to super-speed blows, how can Wally possibly defeat an opponent who's even more powerful than he is? Amidst the wreckage of The Flash Museum during a severe lightning storm, Wally must stop "Barry" from destroying the Flash's legacy while fighting for his own. The story gut-wrenching at times with some of the twists, and the revelation of the villain was superb, hints given along the way until the final reveal (which was a HUGE deal at the time that, believe it or not, NO ONE saw coming, although it seems obvious now). By the end, Wally's long-standing guilt and mental blocks which had kept him from reaching his true power and potential are gone, and he takes his deserved, rightful place as the One, True Flash. Deserves points just for being a comic book story involving time travel that actually makes sense.

Green Lantern:
-"Green Lantern: Rebirth": I never liked Hal Jordan. I liked Green Lantern but not him, specifically. Once they made him a villain and later, The Spectre, I was honestly glad to be rid of him. When I heard they were bringing him back, I cried foul, feeling his return from the dead would be cheesy and that they were going to undo everything that had happened in the books since then. I was wrong. This book not only logically ties everything together, it actually explains everything anyone would ever need to know about the entire Green Lantern mythology from the very beginning, and celebrates it. It's epic, going from Earth to space and through the spaces between life and death as Hal Jordan fights not just for his life or his legacy, but for his very soul. Is he fated to save the universe, or destroy it? As the title says, it wasn't just a "Rebirth" for Hal Jordan, it brought the entire GL franchise back to life in a huge way. Any book that showcases Guy Gardner as an Alpha-Level Bad-Ass automatically gets my stamp, but this book did what I thought was impossible in making me a huge fan of Hal Jordan.

Those are just a few of my VERY favorite stories. I'll add a few more after some other people add theirs. :)

MsMarvelDuckie
10-18-2013, 11:07 PM
Spider-Man- "Revelation": Aunt May finally discovers his secret, and confronts Peter about why he's been hiding his double life from her. Great story, very emotional, and liberating for both Peter and May. I loved the heart-to-heart talk they have in that issue, and how she promises to try to accept and understand what he does and why.

"Happy Birthday": Another amazing arc from JMS, this time giving Peter a chance to change the past by preventing his past self from being bitten, while at the same time seeing his "possible" future death while trapped in a temporal limbo where all points in his life intersect. It was incredibly riveting to see how he meets his "end"(though it's not written in stone, to be sure) and seeing him making the choice of whether to let the past remain, or to alter his entire life.

Captain America- "Fallen Son"" The fall-out of Cap's assassination after the Civil War saga, seen from the eyes of some of his closest friends and fellow heroes.

X-Men- "Phoenix: Endsong": The reappearance of the Phoenix, resurrects Jean (again) and is hunted down by a ship of Shi'ar who wish to destroy it for good. Naturally, the Phoenix's state of mind and desire to understand mortal desire and love brings back the Dark Phoenix, and it even takes possession of Emma Frost at one point. In the end, Emma and Scott, Xavier, and ALL the X-Men band together mentally to show her their love and "save" her, just as the Shi'ar ship is about to perform a suicide run with a weapon designed to obliterate the Phoenix- and anyone within a thousand miles of it! She becomes the "White Phoenix" and saves them in return. Lovely art, well-written, and it explores the very nature of the Phoenix itself, and it's connection to Jean.

Leo656
10-18-2013, 11:48 PM
Most of my Marvel memories are from the Venom and Carnage-era Spider-Man stories. :ohwell: That's most of what I read from Marvel as a kid, all the early Venom and Carnage stuff in Spider-Man. I liked the whole "dark twin" aspect of Venom and both Venom and Carnage were very visually arresting. I haven't read them in a long time, though, but I remember really liking those stories in particular.

The only semi-recent Marvel stuff I've read was the "Supreme Power"/"Squadron Supreme" books. They were OK. I thought "Startling Stories: Banner" was a really good Hulk story.

Part of why I wanted to do this thread was so people could get into things they haven't read based on stuff other people would recommend. :)

MrPliggins
10-19-2013, 12:57 AM
Spider-man:

Web of Spider-man #69-70 - Spider-Hulk!

Spectacular Spider-man #178-200: "The Child Within" up until the Death of Harry Osborn - I read this as a kid but loved it. This series of books made J.M. DeMatteis one of my favorite writers. I should reread these issues.

Amazing Spider-man #400 - death of Aunt May. A perfect and emotional ending for the longtime character who had long overstayed her welcome. Too bad it was retconned.

Batman:
agree with "A Death in the Family" but I've not read many other Batman stories.

Incredible Hulk:

#324-377 and beyond- Peter David breathed some much needed new life into the painfully stale Hulk comic (trust me, I've read them all. Even 181 isn't that great story-wise). The return of the Gray Hulk and his Mr. Fixit days are some of my favorite Hulk stories. But then Bruce got cancer, the Green Hulk returned, a new Hulk formed, side characters actually developed, etc. etc. Great reading.

Planet Hulk/World War Hulk: While I believe it was slightly overrated at the time, it was an interesting new idea that had never been done before. A great read from start to finish, and I rather enjoyed the animated movie adaptation, too.

I haven't read much DC outside of Batman and the Death of Superman, so thanks for that list.

MikeandRaph87
10-19-2013, 10:59 AM
Its hard to have a definitive list of favorites but here are ten of my top favorites

Batman#237, "Night of The Reaper".
Batman#321, "Happy Birthday, Dreadful Joker"
Batman#608-#619 "Hush"
Batman:The Long Halloween/Dark Victory
Amazing Spider-Man#681-#687, "Ends of The Earth"
Amazing Spider-Man#500," Happy Brithday"
Justice maxi-series
Batgirl Year One mini-series
Green Lantern: Rebirth
Green Lantern:Sinestro Corps War

ZariusTwo
10-20-2013, 04:44 PM
Superman

A lot of the early Milton Fine Brainiac stories are up there as just a fun little ride, the whole arc where Lex Luthor kept him prisoner just built and built and had a really sublime payoff with Brainiac escaping in his skull ship, which in turn led to bonkers crossover fun like "Panic In The Sky"

"Superman vs The Incredible Hulk" is a wonderful peice by Roger Stern that ties into the Hulk's recent pains and certaingly more than makes up for, in terms of action and heartfelt touches, their short encounter in the contrived Marvel vs DC series.

Geoff Jones and Richard Donner's "Last Son" arc is a joy. General Zod as we all prefer him, a gripping series of cliff-hangers, wall to wall action and the promising tease of Lois as a mother and her initial reluctance followed by warm acceptance of the role.

Superman/Batman "Public Enemies" was one of the last times DC actually let their hair down and had a fun stupendously crazy moment. The end of the age I grew up on, before the dork age allure of the Crisis shlock came about, and the fall of President Luthor...plus a mighty Bat/Supes spaceship. Nifty.

Also Superman: Brainiac, War on Krypton and Grounded (yes...Grounded) are good calibure choices too.

Batman

"Grant Morrison's Batman". Plot twists I wouldnt otherwise tolerate (making everything, without exception, canon. Damien, Talia's heel turn, Batman as a franchise) are made accesible and enjoyable thanks to a fantastic yarn that weaves every strand together in different and unexpected, and even meta ways as Batman comes the closest to being a global influence and pays the ultimate price for it

"Steven Englehart's Batman"- This, including Dark Detective, is such an influential peice of work, a lot of Batman: TAS owes it's run to this. Silver St. Cloud is the perfect example of a conflicted romantic interest, saddled with Bruce's secret and not knowing what to do with it, the gradual breakdown and haunting of Rupert Thorne by the ghost of Hugo Strange, and one of the most stirring and iconic Joker stories of the silver age in "The Laughing Fish", which was adapted for the animated series

Spider-Man

Stan Lee/Steve Ditko's early run...can't go wrong with the blueprint for the way our favourite everyman hero works.

Death of George Stacy: Shows off how lethal a force Doc Ock is and cuts Peter off from who was essentially his third father (after Richard and Uncle Ben) and sours Gwen's outlook on Spidey

Death of Gwen Stacy: ..And sure enough, Peter's iconic "first love" dies in the only story people remember her for and the seeds are sown for the union of Peter and MJ, which divides fans and Marvel editorial to this day, as well as gives the Silver Age a fairly sound kick to the curb. Of all the deaths Spidey's undone, this one has surprisingly stuck.

Roger Stern's Hobgoblin arc: Takes the lingering mystery of the Green Goblin arc of the 60s and dials it up to eleven with some fantastic old-school action, stirring revelations for Harry and leads to some great buddy moments between him and Peter near the end

The Alien Costume: Peter brings the alien symbiote to Earth, MJ 'fesses up and her and Peter's bond becomes even stronger, and the apperance of the iconic Amazing Bag-Man!

The Clone Saga..yeah, yeah, don't give me dirty looks. I know it's the "in" thing to dislike the stories and Linkara's reviews of it don't make it any easier to be a fan, but it truly was the last ambitious Spider-Man story in terms of advancing the character, from just about making him a father to killing off Aunt May to introducing characters that became bigger deals later down the line like Kaine, and it gave us back Norman Osborn, who would be reinvented in the Lex Luthor mold for a good chunk of the 2000s.

The best thing really is the whole saga, left up in the air on how it exactly went due to One More Day f*cking up the timeline, is that it all still counts in the Spider-Girl book, which for anyone who's tired of Spider-Man's story remaining static and unchanging, represents a fantastic and bold step forward for every character with an endearing and whimsical led heroine doing her father proud. This is Peter and MJ's happy ending and someone's grand first chapter.

Two of my favourites comes from the daily newspaper strip, which have been my go-to place for Spidey action since the notorious One More Day permanently soured me on the regular books. There was 2009's Sandman storyline, where gave Flint Marko a daughter and seemed to spin out of a version of Spider-Man 3, he basicly is forced to work for a group of thugs when his daughter is kidnapped and it leads to conflict and then a team-up with Spidey to save her. Vintage old-school writing that despite being a bit shlocky, proved tremendosuly entertaining.

Another story from the dailies is 2012's Clown 9 arc, published during the 25th anniverary of Spider-Man's marraige (the marraige is still intact in this strip), which despite being critically derided for it's absurd near year-long length contains some awesome, touching and often hilarious Peter and MJ interactions as they deal with an egotistical and handsome star actor in their midst all while Spidey battles a Joker rip-off.

JMS' Spider-Totem storylines are also some of my favourite things in comics ever...true it went off the rails a bit with "The Other", but before that you had the silent

"Funeral Arrangements"- The best Vulture story ever, where he tries to come to terms with dying of cancer and attempts to make things right with May Parker, leading to Peter's capture and May finally making peace with Spider-Man...but never forgiving Tooms for killing her fiance of the 80s Nathan.

"The Child Within"-Fantastic triple header of an agsty Peter, needy and vengeful Harry, and a wild Vermin

"Best of Enemies"- Harry Osborn's gripping and iconic death story which gave him a memorable and impactful send-off...before they retconned that too.

ObiWanFan4life
10-20-2013, 04:53 PM
X-Men : God Loves, Man Kills - The comic that X2 is based on and made me an X-Men Fan.

Wolverine : Enemy of the State - I'm a fan of Mark Millar's work, especially this and Kick-Ass.

Batman : The Long Halloween - Has all my favorite villians in it.

Rockvoanjd
10-20-2013, 06:14 PM
Kraven's Last Hunt
Saga of the Swamp Thing
Miracleman
Preacher
Punisher Welcome Back Frank run
Lone Wolf and Cub
Daredevil Born Again run
It's a manga but badass. Berserk
Sin City That Yellow Bastard
Others I can't recall at the moment

Type 97 Chi-ha
10-20-2013, 06:26 PM
Batman: Dark Knight, Dark City.

The Riddler has become far more vicious than previously, shocking even Batman. He kidnaps four babies from a hospital, tricks Batman into showering him with blood, and manipulates the Batman into jumping through all sorts of proverbial hoops. He even deliberately avoids killing Batman when he has the chance...but the Riddler finds to his dismay that he wasn't in control of events as he had originally assumed.

Leo656
10-20-2013, 11:36 PM
Lots of really good stuff here so far. :)

Just for fun, I'll toss in a couple of my favorite single-issue stories:

Action Comics Annual #1: "Skeeter!" - Batman traces a series of murders to a small town in South Carolina and quickly realizes there's more going on than meets the eye and that he's in over his head. He calls in Superman for help (in only their second-ever official team-up, according to Post-Crisis canon), and the pair quickly discover that the string of murders are connected to a brood of vampires and a mysterious teenage girl (or is she?). There's a pervasive darkness over every page, from the writing to the art, especially by the standards of how Superman and Batman were presented in 1987. Plus, it's always fun when either one fights vampires, but throw it all together and it's absolutely amazing. I read the hell out of this issue when I was 5, and it's one of my absolute favorite single-issues of any comic, ever. It might be my sentimental favorite. I highly recommend it, it's an easy find for a buck just about anywhere.

Adventures of Superman Annual #1: "The Union" - When an entire city's worth of people disappear from a town in South Dakota, the President sends Superman to investigate. He finds no life anywhere, and eventually discovers that all the town's inhabitants were killed by an alien known as the Word-Bringer and assimilated into a grotesque hive mind, granting them "Union" and using it/them as his slave through which he channels tremendous telekinetic powers. The Word-Bringer flees when he realizes he cannot overcome Superman's rage, though he would make one more appearance during Superman's exile in space about one year later. Two things made this book stand out for me as a very young child: The atmosphere, and the ending. The atmosphere was very lonely and haunting, as Superman is the only character seen on almost every page as he drifts through an entirely abandoned town where it looks as though every man, woman, child and pet simply vanished into thin air (before we find the truth was much more horrifying, as they were all killed and their minds merged with the collective). And finally, the ending itself was very controversial at the time, as after the Word-Bringer flees, there's still the "small" problem of what to do with what's left of the town's inhabitants...
Collectively, the hive-mind reaches out to Superman for help, begging him to kill Them/It and set them free for good. With Superman refusing to take a life, the hive-mind reaches out with their collective telekinesis, physically takes control of Superman and FORCES him to kill them as he desperately tries to resist, choosing oblivion over their tortured existence as part of the collective. Overcome with grief over his "failure", Superman leaves and never tells anyone what really happened in Trudeau, South Dakota.
As a 5-year-old kid, I was like :o.

Batman #423: "You Should'a Seen Him!" - One of those really great Batman stories that shows how different he appears to different people, but also how many different layers there are to Batman's own personality. Three cops get together and start sharing Batman stories, all of them happening within the same night; In the first, Batman rescues a young drug addict from committing suicide by jumping off a bridge, but demands he take responsibility for his actions and fix his life. In the second story, a SWAT team member tells a story of how Batman ruthlessly and mercilessly took out a gang of thugs who were terrorizing hostages inside a convenience store, stopping them from killing an elderly woman. Batman saves the woman's life by viciously hurling one of the thugs through a plate glass window. As the first two cops agree about how cold and ruthless Batman is, the third cop counters with a story of how earlier that night he saw Batman give refuge to a pair of young orphans, a brother and sister who were living on the streets after their parents were killed. The two cops disbelieve the story, since the third cop swears he saw Batman shed a single tear as he heard the children's tale. The three officers part ways, each with their own opinion on what Batman is "really" like, meanwhile Bruce and Alfred watch over the kids at Wayne Manor and discuss reuniting them with their relatives in Florida. Among being great for lots of reasons, this issue contains my all-time favorite Batman quote, when he saves the old woman from the gang leader: "... And I swear that if you harm that woman at all, I'll make you pay! I will break and twist things within you. You can't conceive of the pain I can cause. It's pain that will go on forever! You won't escape it... because I won't LET you DIE!"

Nowadays we're trained to read things in 6-issue arcs, but there have been a ton of great single-issue stories over the years, for sure.

DaVinci
10-26-2013, 04:22 PM
Green Lantern:
-"Green Lantern: Rebirth": I never liked Hal Jordan. I liked Green Lantern but not him, specifically. Once they made him a villain and later, The Spectre, I was honestly glad to be rid of him. When I heard they were bringing him back, I cried foul, feeling his return from the dead would be cheesy and that they were going to undo everything that had happened in the books since then. I was wrong. This book not only logically ties everything together, it actually explains everything anyone would ever need to know about the entire Green Lantern mythology from the very beginning, and celebrates it. It's epic, going from Earth to space and through the spaces between life and death as Hal Jordan fights not just for his life or his legacy, but for his very soul. Is he fated to save the universe, or destroy it? As the title says, it wasn't just a "Rebirth" for Hal Jordan, it brought the entire GL franchise back to life in a huge way. Any book that showcases Guy Gardner as an Alpha-Level Bad-Ass automatically gets my stamp, but this book did what I thought was impossible in making me a huge fan of Hal Jordan.


Hi, just curious: What did you think of the Sinestro Corps War?

Cipher
10-26-2013, 05:57 PM
I don't have the same depth of reading as most people in this thread, I'm guessing, as I've only started regularly reading comics outside of Turtles (mostly DC) within the last year. That said, here's my list in no particular order:

Grant Morrison's New X-Men - All of it
Self-contained enough to be considered one story. This is up there with "City at War" as my favorite run on an in-continuity comic.

"City at War" - TMNT
This is what happens when a longtime quirky action series suddenly gets smart, and does it ever.

The Dark Knight Strikes Again
I like this narrowly better than Returns because of how ahead of its time it feels. Which brings me to,

The Dark Knight Returns
Again, an age-old character suddenly gets smart. It's a shame this is credited along with the next one on my list for ushering in an era of grim and grittiness for their own sake, because it really wasn't doing that at all.

Watchmen
Everyone and their cat loves this, right? It's because everyone and their cat is right, and this still makes one of the best uses of superhero tropes and the comic book format I've seen.

Batman - The Long Halloween
Sort of a guilty pleasure book, as it's more recommendable for its beautiful art and accessibility to new readers than anything deeper. But this is a fun book. A really, really fun book, and one that I can come back to any number of times.

TMNT - "Sons of the Silent Age"
Love it. Been discussed plenty of times on these boards.

TMNT - "Soul's Winter"
See above. I wish we'd gotten more of this.

I also love William/Rucka/Blackman's Batwoman run to bits, but I have trouble pinpointing an exact run of issues that I'd place on the same level as the entries above. Definitely a favorite though. Lately I've also been delving into a bit of both Golden Age and New 52 Superman, which I've enjoyed, but haven't yet found anything on that really top-tier level. It's just fun.

TurtleTitan97
10-26-2013, 06:10 PM
Some that come to mind for me are

Superman: For All Seasons
The Dark Knight Returns
Batman: War Games
Batman: Under The Red Hood
The Night Gwen Stacy Died
Spider-Man: The Other
The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man
Spider-Man: Grim Hunt
Batman: Year One
X-Men: Fall Of Mutants
Hulk: Grey
Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
Blackest Night
New Teen Titans: The Terror of Trigon
Daredevil: Guardian Devil
Old Man Logan
TMNT #1
Spider-Man: If This Be My Destiny...!

Sofistocat
10-26-2013, 09:15 PM
Avengers Kree Skrull War

Infinity Gauntlet

Marvel Secret Wars I

Dark Knight Returns

Aliens: Colonial Marines (the original)

Any Cerebus storyline

Death of Captain Marvel

Wolverine mini series and Punisher mini series (originals)

F. Miller Daredevil run

Gnatrat stories

Fantastic Four: The Galactus Trilogy (48.49.50)

For a single book, Amazing Spiderman Annual #1 is pretty good. First Sinister Six appearance

Leo656
10-27-2013, 02:46 PM
Hi, just curious: What did you think of the Sinestro Corps War?

Loved it. But I'm a total mark for Green Lantern.

Cipher: Weird thing is, I f*cking HATED "Dark Knight Strikes Again". For one, Miller didn't want to do it, and he literally only did it for the money, and to me, it shows, big time. It completely "broke" the Dark Knight Universe as being even a potential possible future for Batman and the DCU. Even though "Dark Knight Returns" isn't the future *I* would have picked for Batman and the DCU, it still kind of "fit." DK2 kind of went off the rails. I remember when it came out, lots of angry conversations at the comic shop amongst fanboys. :lol: The clerks had a large stack of unsold copies on the counter for a year, and they'd actively discourage anyone from buying it.

It's entertaining in its own way, though, I guess.

Whatswiththeheadbands?
10-27-2013, 03:36 PM
Loved it. But I'm a total mark for Green Lantern.

Cipher: Weird thing is, I f*cking HATED "Dark Knight Strikes Again". For one, Miller didn't want to do it, and he literally only did it for the money, and to me, it shows, big time. It completely "broke" the Dark Knight Universe as being even a potential possible future for Batman and the DCU. Even though "Dark Knight Returns" isn't the future *I* would have picked for Batman and the DCU, it still kind of "fit." DK2 kind of went off the rails. I remember when it came out, lots of angry conversations at the comic shop amongst fanboys. :lol: The clerks had a large stack of unsold copies on the counter for a year, and they'd actively discourage anyone from buying it.

It's entertaining in its own way, though, I guess.

I haven't read it myself, but the plot seems interesting, as it shows what has happened to the other DC heroes.

The art, though throws me off. Looks like they colored it in with felt tips:ohwell:

MikeandRaph87
10-27-2013, 03:52 PM
Headbands, it is collected in two volumes of tradepaperback. You can also get inidivual issues of just Green Lantern or Green Lantern Corps and still get the whole story. There are also four oneshots that go allong with it focusing on the villains of the arc. I would reccommend getting the two tpbs if you are looking for a good read. Its a well-paced fantastic storyline.

I see a lot of my choices repeated by others. I guess I chose classics. :)

DaVinci
10-28-2013, 12:05 PM
Loved it. But I'm a total mark for Green Lantern.


Cool, I just got it recently and really enjoyed it. Thinking about getting Tales of the Sinestro Corps next.

cowabunga14
11-15-2013, 01:30 AM
Daredevil: The Man Without Fear
Avengers: The Serpent Crown
The Dark Knight Returns
Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth
Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth
Saga of the Swamp Thing
Fatal Attractions
Spider-Man vs. Wolverine
Lifetheft
Cerebus
Batman Annual #14: "The Eye of the Beholder"
Swamp Thing #61: "All Flesh is Grass"
Web of Spider-Man #13: "Point of View"

Jester
11-15-2013, 01:49 AM
Joss Whedon's run on Astonishing X-men. (Love the wit.)
Future Shark Trilogy.
The Battle of the Atom (time travel weirdness....love it)
Wolverine: Origin.
Too be honest I've not read many great comic arcs...and I'm sure I'm missing some I have.

pingclang
11-15-2013, 11:24 AM
Captain America: The Bloodstone Hunt. I love the story in this series. It had a huge scale and covered so many different aspects of Cap`s day to day, showing him in a ton of different situations but still managed to keep an overarching story. It's pure awesome.

Green Arrow: Longbow Hunters. Only three issues but Longbow set up the 80 issue arch by Mike Grell that is some of the most amazing storytelling in comics. Period. Longbow is a very adult, complicated story with a little tragedy mixed in and paved the way for such an amazing turn in the Green Arrow mythos.

Thor: Walt Simonson`s run. Not sure if this counts since it's an entire run, but Simonson took Thor and did some new, awesome things with him. His run is still mentioned as the best Thor stuff and I have to agree. It felt like a Fantasy series, even when he was on Earth and the writing was out of this world good. Love it.

TMNT 1-8: Now, with Mirage Turtles, I've loved everything I've read, even the bad one's, but I love the first 8 especially. The first few are so good but when the world hopping starts, I absolutely go nuts. I love those stories because they're fun, entertaining and written so well. Granted, I haven't read all of the first volume of Turtles so I might like something in there more if I had, but this is still my favorite.

JoshDA7X
11-15-2013, 03:33 PM
Other than Turtles, I'd have to go with Kevin Smiths Batman Cacophony and The Widening Gyre, Batman The Long Halloween and without a shadow of a doubt the Locke and Key series (even though I've not read the last one yet!).

Roland
11-20-2013, 03:17 PM
The Amazing Spiderman vol 1 no 425 (aug 1997) ,The chump. the challenge. The champ.:

One of the awesome fights against Electro!

Spiderman vol 1 no 1 (July 1997) , A prelude in red:

Where the Stacy brothers find out a serial killer is a mutant. I like how Arthur Stacy is right in the end.

Leo656
11-20-2013, 09:20 PM
pingclang: I also liked "The Longbow Hunters". It was the right time and place for that story, a true "80s Style/Dark N Gritty" take on Green Arrow. I'm generally hit or miss on Arrow, I like him conceptually but at times the character's been portrayed very hokey. Longbow Hunters is one of the few stories that really rang true to the character; I've never once bought that a guy who uses a bow and arrow as his primary weapon has, most often, been portrayed as someone who doesn't kill bad guys. That's ludicrous, no matter how "cutesey" the boxing glove arrows etc. are. I didn't "get" the hubbub in the aftermath of "Cry For Justice"/"Fall Of Green Arrow", the fallout from Arrow killing Prometheus because I didn't think for that character it would be a big deal. Some characters, the no-killing code makes sense, but he isn't one of them, OTHER than being an uber-liberal. The entire arrow gimmick more or less implies lethal force.

I guess part of why I sometimes don't like the character a ton is how inconsistently he's been portrayed. They never even do a hard reboot, either, it's always arbitrary based on who the writer is, sometimes Arrow kills people and sometimes he's someone who has never and would never kill, and I just don't like that kind of inconsistency. In my head, Longbow Hunters is the "real" Green Arrow.

pingclang
11-20-2013, 11:10 PM
As much as I love the character, Leo, you're right. One of the more frustrating things about him is how he's back and forth on his extremes. A lot of the fallout from the events of Cry for Justice came from the fact he promised Black Canary when they married that he wouldn't kill anymore. I guess shooting someone in the wrist with an arrow is perfectly fine. That was the beauty of Longbow and the series it led to, he was exactly what someone with his set of skills would be.