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View Full Version : Any Stephen King fans out there?


blindturtle02
01-26-2014, 03:43 PM
I searched for a SK discussion thread but couldn't find one. It's always been fun meeting other King fans and discussing his works. No other author of horror novels has even come close to giving me a good scare. As for what topics to bring up, go nuts, I guess. Mods feel free to delete this thing if I made a dub.

Blossombrooks
01-27-2014, 04:55 PM
I've only read Dreamcatcher but it was an addictive story, it's a while ago now but I did read it several times. I felt like I'd missed some of the details on the first pass and I recall being right.
I'm not a big horror fan but I'd much rather read a good scary story than see the film. I saw The Mist a few years back, god, I still hate driving in the fog! The ending was a killer too, I guess I should read the book to get the full experience but then I'll be even more of wreck in the mist, lol! ;)

blindturtle02
01-27-2014, 06:17 PM
I've only read Dreamcatcher but it was an addictive story, it's a while ago now but I did read it several times. I felt like I'd missed some of the details on the first pass and I recall being right.
I'm not a big horror fan but I'd much rather read a good scary story than see the film. I saw The Mist a few years back, god, I still hate driving in the fog! The ending was a killer too, I guess I should read the book to get the full experience but then I'll be even more of wreck in the mist, lol! ;)

Dreamcatcher is one I've only read once. Need to go back and reread that one. lol I cried at the end of that one though! If you decide to give The Mist in story form a go, it's located in Skeleton Crew, one of his short story anthologies. It's a pretty lengthy novella. I really enjoyed that one. The movie was awesome but yeah, even though I can't see it, I shudder whenever someone says it's going to be foggy or misty outdoors. haha

Dawnatello Turtle Chick
01-27-2014, 06:27 PM
I was a huge Stephen King fan when I was in Middle School- read a lot of his older classics- Cujo, Pet Sematary, Firestarter, The Shining, etc. I then got myself too spooked and stopped reading them for a while. Picked up Bag of Bones around 2004 but couldn't get into it. Then I just stopped reading for pleasure for a while due to the meds I was on at the time, just wasn't interested in reading for "fun" (sounds dumb I know)- I just read textbooks about dog behavior and dog training/behavior books. I just started reading for fun again in the last year... Might have to catch up on some Stephen King.

To any who've read his newer stuff AND older stuff- has his style changed at all?

MastahShredder
01-27-2014, 07:03 PM
IT is my favorite book ever.

blindturtle02
01-27-2014, 09:42 PM
Dawnatello: Loved Pet Sem and Cujo. I'm just now getting around to adding those books to my King library since they put Cujo on audio only a few years ago. I'm a member of this library service for the blind and dyslexic that also allows readers to download audiobooks to digital talking book players, so that how I managed to come by Pet Sem and such. It's available 24-7, so I practically own the book. Anyway, compared to Joyland and Doctor Sleep or 112263, I'd say they're pretty much the same style. I guess I've been reading him for so long now that I don't really know the difference. Really haven't noticed a style change. I'm too busy hiding under my covers! He's still a very personabel writer. Almost forgot, Bag of Bones is by far my all time favorite ghost story. Although I've heard his fellow writer Peter Straub pens some real page turners too. I also need to check out his son's novels. He goes by the pseudonym Joe Hill.

MastahShredder, I agree. IT is astounding. Pennywise has to be the scariest villain I've ever come across because IT can be whatever it chooses to be. Although I will say that another King villain-- a certain dark and sinister fellow in run down cowboy boots and a denim jacket, ties with IT in my mind when it comes to being scary. Readers of The Stand and Dark Tower series will know who I'm talking about. That's another reason why he's my favorite author. You just can't seem to forget his villains. I've read this guy's stuff for quite some time now, and these two forementioned long-leggedy beasties still manage to give me the shivers every time they pop out at me with the turn of a page. Well, the press of the play button in my case. Meh, a book's a book. You get the idea.

Leo656
01-28-2014, 03:11 AM
He's very prolific, but by that same token, he's got a lot of good and a lot of less-good. I personally haven't read enough to know which is which, exactly, but I know he's had a few clunkers. I have all the usual suspects, though, Pet Sematary, Skeleton Crew, etc. I just haven't read them in forever.

"Survivor Type" probably made me more uncomfortable than anything I've ever read, ever. My high school Creative Writing teacher, Mr. Breese, was a huge Stephen King fan, and often had us read King stories or watch King movies in class. When he read "Survivor Type" out loud to the class, he said up front that some people may want to leave, and were free to do so at any time. A few who had read it encouraged this. I can take a lot, but I also have a very vivid imagination and can visualize things very easily. I didn't have to leave - I can't remember if anyone actually did - but a few of us were visibly lightheaded, and several had to grab a quick drink from the fountain to calm down.

Probably the most sickening thing ever, in the sense that, unlike monsters or creatures or aliens or straight up "horror"... it's the idea, the fact, that someone could just DO that... I still struggle through reading it. But even though I "hate" it, I love and respect that effect it has on me, which means it did the job. It stays with you. You read it, you don't ever want to even think about it again, but you will. One day, at random, something about "lady fingers" is gonna put that sh*t back in your head after you locked it away for years and you're gonna lose your goddamn appetite.

MastahShredder
01-28-2014, 07:35 AM
MastahShredder, I agree. IT is astounding. Pennywise has to be the scariest villain I've ever come across because IT can be whatever it chooses to be. Although I will say that another King villain-- a certain dark and sinister fellow in run down cowboy boots and a denim jacket, ties with IT in my mind when it comes to being scary. Readers of The Stand and Dark Tower series will know who I'm talking about. That's another reason why he's my favorite author. You just can't seem to forget his villains. I've read this guy's stuff for quite some time now, and these two forementioned long-leggedy beasties still manage to give me the shivers every time they pop out at me with the turn of a page. Well, the press of the play button in my case. Meh, a book's a book. You get the idea.

What are your thoughts on the film? Tim Curry was amazing as Pennywise.

blindturtle02
01-28-2014, 08:17 AM
I loved the film too! When I read the novel, I'll always hear his voice in my head. That was actually the first horror movie I ever saw. My mom watched it on its two premier nights back in Nov of... I wanna say 90? Sure I had to leave the room a few times back then, but I managed to watch most of it. That's one of my favorite TV miniseries of all time. I think it translated from book to film extremely well.

MastahShredder
01-28-2014, 08:23 AM
I loved the film too! When I read the novel, I'll always hear his voice in my head. That was actually the first horror movie I ever saw. My mom watched it on its two premier nights back in Nov of... I wanna say 90? Sure I had to leave the room a few times back then, but I managed to watch most of it. That's one of my favorite TV miniseries of all time. I think it translated from book to film extremely well.

I agree and like most SK films the ending was pretty meh. I wish they had the giant bird scene and the Paul Bunyon statue among others in the film. Pennywise was the ultimate troll.

There are plans to remake IT but I don't know if it's still in development hell.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/stephen-kings-be-adapted-by-334899

It's two years old so who knows..

blindturtle02
01-28-2014, 12:42 PM
Loved the bird sceen. That would have been great. I think one of the scariest lines uttered by Pennywise was from that statue sceen. "You'll wake up in hell!" Definitely the ultimate troll. I also liked the Derry standpipe sceen and wish they could have incorporated that somehow. Those dead boys could give the zombies in RE a run for their money. Interesting how IT can split itself into multiple parts like that.

As for a remake, I'm thinking it probably won't happen but then movies have escaped from development hell before. I'd give it a go, but Tim Curry will always be the definitive Pennywise for me. Hope King decides to bring it back in another novel some day. At least a cameo.

Dawnatello Turtle Chick
01-28-2014, 03:43 PM
He's very prolific, but by that same token, he's got a lot of good and a lot of less-good. I personally haven't read enough to know which is which, exactly, but I know he's had a few clunkers. I have all the usual suspects, though, Pet Sematary, Skeleton Crew, etc. I just haven't read them in forever.

This website (http://www.vulture.com/2012/04/ranking-all-62-stephen-king-books.html) is a pretty nice one as far as deciding whether a King book is up your alley. Not only does is rank them but it lists why they are where they are- like some of his older stuff that he wrote in a drug induced craze might not be up your alley.

Leo656
01-28-2014, 09:55 PM
I like how he completely admitted his failure directing Maximum Overdrive by blaming it all on his cocaine habit. Attaboy.

blindturtle02
01-29-2014, 12:55 PM
I read The Tommyknockers for the first time last summer and am guessing he was pretty far gone when he wrote that one? That one was back in 87, so it definitely fits. It wasn't one of my favs. There were some memorable horror sceens in there, however. He talks about those times in On Writing, I think. It's been a few years since I read that one so I won't swear to it. I'm glad he admitted he had a major problem and decided to change things. Wonder if I should give his son's novels a shot. My bh and I were going to start one last October together but read some short stories instead. I need to read her The Boogeyman. That one made me want to bar my closet door shut at night for a while! I actually slept with the light on a few nights, so that's saying something.

MastahShredder
01-29-2014, 01:36 PM
Loved the bird sceen. That would have been great. I think one of the scariest lines uttered by Pennywise was from that statue sceen. "You'll wake up in hell!" Definitely the ultimate troll. I also liked the Derry standpipe sceen and wish they could have incorporated that somehow. Those dead boys could give the zombies in RE a run for their money. Interesting how IT can split itself into multiple parts like that.

As for a remake, I'm thinking it probably won't happen but then movies have escaped from development hell before. I'd give it a go, but Tim Curry will always be the definitive Pennywise for me. Hope King decides to bring it back in another novel some day. At least a cameo.

http://i.imgur.com/yZiuZIO.jpg

Always cracks me up. Who says that? lol

blindturtle02
01-29-2014, 03:34 PM
Oh, the "you'll wake up in hell," line? Pennywise was playing tricks on Richy via the Paul Bunyan statue. I forget if it happened in the 50's or the 80's when the Losers came back to Derry.

MastahShredder
01-29-2014, 05:34 PM
Oh, the "you'll wake up in hell," line? Pennywise was playing tricks on Richy via the Paul Bunyan statue. I forget if it happened in the 50's or the 80's when the Losers came back to Derry.

Nope, the GET OUT BEFORE IT GETS DARK TONIGHT. LAST CHANCE TOZIER.

It makes me chuckle.

9AA-sEV5YYI

blindturtle02
01-29-2014, 05:47 PM
Ah there we go. Yeah that bit of dialogue always gave me chills as a kid. You might also like Insomnia, MastahShredder. It's set in Derry as well. This novel is about half the length of IT. Thinkin about reading it after I get done with the newest Star Wars novel and some SK short stories.

shuriken
01-29-2014, 09:41 PM
Carrie and the Shining are my faves, Misery is also a damn masterpiece of psychological torture.
Pet Semetary was also great. The green Mile is as good as it is depressing.
I really disliked Christine and Thinner. But at least the movie Christine is ridiculous enough to be enjoyable. Thinner the movie was just bad.

blindturtle02
01-29-2014, 10:50 PM
Carrie and the Shining are my faves, Misery is also a damn masterpiece of psychological torture.
Pet Semetary was also great. The green Mile is as good as it is depressing.
I really disliked Christine and Thinner. But at least the movie Christine is ridiculous enough to be enjoyable. Thinner the movie was just bad.

I loved Misery. Got to read that book a few months ago and think I might reread it sooner rather than later. I'm just now getting to read a tun of his oldest novels, so yeah I have to agree about Carrie and The Shining. Only read Carrie once back in 2006, and it's high time I gave that one another. I loved it. That one was very short so I flew through it in no time. I liked his afterword in that one. Yeah even though The Green Mile was a bit depressing, it's still a terrific read. I love the serial novel approach he took with it.

discordiatookie
01-30-2014, 03:45 PM
Absolutely love King's work. There's only two or three books that I haven't really loved - but still enjoyed (hmm, namely Cell and Under The Dome are the two that come to mind). With very few exceptions (Neil Gaiman and the Game of Throne books most recently) when I'm reading other writers' novels I want to be reading Stephen King. It's like I'm addicted!

Just finished reading a couple of short stories, about half an hour ago I completed Jerusalem's Lot, and am now away to reread Lisey's Story. Amazing book, loved it first time around, I'm looking forward to it.

Some random thoughts:

When I was a late teenager, early twenties, King became a bond between my mum and I. We would get a book each, read it and then swap over, discussing them when we were done. We got through his back catalogue that way, good times.

I remember being quite young, and my Mum had Skeleton Key up on the bookshelf. Hardback, with a skeleton on the cover. I used to think that cover was awesome. I tried reading it once or twice but it was a bit old for me.

My first book was Desperation, on paperback that I got from my Mum. I was around 14, and had never read anything quite like it. I've still got it, and the copy of Skeleton Key in my shelf ('though Desperation is falling apart now).

I went through a bit of a rough time in my early 20s, split up with my first long term girlfriend, I moved back home only for my Mum's partner at the time to leave and we ended up nearly homeless, amongst other things and I remember skiving off college one day because I couldn't be arsed with it all. I had a new book, a beat up copy of The first Dark Tower book so I climbed a hill (the Broad Hill, not that big but pretty cool, one side looks over a graveyard, the other the beach, and it also gives you a wee peek to the local football (soccer) stadium, where before the new stand got put in, gave a big peek and was nicknamed Miser's Hilly) and read the whole thing in a day. It was sunny and windy, and a great way to immerse myself into a book! I snapped up the other three (at the time) Dark Tower books and devoured them, and got the next three on the day they were released.

(Side note: it was around this time I had rediscovered TMNT in comic form and I got a bunch of vol 4 issues from a comic shop and wondered down into a park during another sunny day and read them all, once again skiving college).

So yeah, I'm a massive King fan, and his recent run of books (Lisey's Story, Duma Key, 11/22/63, Joyland, Doctor Sleep, All Dark, No Stars, Wind Through the Keyhole, Just After Sunset) are amongst his best, proving to me that he's still got it, and the best writer there is...

blindturtle02
01-30-2014, 05:15 PM
Yeah DT, I remember reading the first 4 Dark Tower books a few years before 5 through 7 were released. I was shopping with my gram in a Mall during July and she was like,"You're birthday's on the 27th, sonny boy. There's something called The Dark Tower. You should let me get the first 4 books for ya." I remember saying something like,"But it sounds like it's about some dumb cowboy. I hate Westerns." She went ahead and let me read the first one as a sort of trial run and I couldn't put the thing down. That one was the original Gunslinger before he revised it throughout. I liked the revised one too btw. But yeah, was so very wrong about my Dark Tower assumptions. Roland is so much more interesting than some cowboy. King says the audiobook narrator nailed the voice he heard in his head. The accent isn't country fried or anything, which surprised and drew me in completely. Roland is like Batman and Castiel from the CW's Supernatural all roled into one. Well Batman doesn't use guns and all that.

I love Lisey's Story. Read that when it first came out in 06 and loved it. 112263 took me a bit longer because of a tun of family emergencies that popped up at once, but loved that one as well. You're right about his more recent titles. They certainly prove he's still the man. Devoured Joyland and Doctor Sleep in no time and am looking forward to his next book, Mr. Mercedes set to be released on June 3rd of this year. That one is going to be a detective story. I've never read a crime novel by him before aside from The Green Mile, so this should be a good one.

Pterobat
01-31-2014, 09:31 AM
Right here. :D

Like a lot of things from several years ago, I haven't kept up with new King stuff. I think the most recent King book I read was "Bag of Bones", which came out in 1998, and I know there's been many more since.

I tend to prefer King's short stories and shorter novels, with the exception being "Needful Things", which is my favourite big heavy King book. "The Dead Zone", "The Shining", "Pet Semetary", and "Carrie" are among my favourite King novels, with the early short story collections like "Night Shift" and "Skeleton Crew" standing out.

King's nonfiction is also great: he's very readable and casual in it, while also incredibly smart. "Danse Macabre" and "On Writing" are both real good.

Sometimes I do get frustrated with his long backstories in his thicker novels, which is why i tend to prefer the short ones. And sometimes he can be a bit cheesy, or maybe VERY cheesy, but Stephen King still knows his stuff, and is one of my favourites.

blindturtle02
01-31-2014, 10:05 AM
Awesome, Pterobat. Danse Macabre is a great romp through a tun of horror genre related media. I snapped that one up and read it in no time. They released a newer version on audio a few years ago. Have you read the one with that new foreword where he talks about movies like Sean of The Dead and all that jazz? The rest of the book's the same but I was thrilled that he wrote about how he felt concerning some early 21st century horror movies and such. Also thought On Writing was a real page turner. Loved the autobiographical sections and the writers' toolbox bits. Never thought he'd write about his accident but he put everything out there in this book. Needful Things was the first King novel I read. I was introduced to him via his short stories.

Skeleton Crew has never been available on audio so I bought Selections From Skeleton Crew right after my 12th birthday years ago. I've gotten to read the whole thing since then and own it of course. Nightmares and Dreamscapes is also another great anthology and I enjoyed Nightshift. John Glover narrates Nightshift stories for the mainstream audio market and he's got a great horror story narrator's voice. They never finished narrating that anthology, however. Very glad I can finally read the whole anthology now regardless of the narrator. I like his forewords and end notes in those colections too.

MastahShredder
01-31-2014, 07:27 PM
http://24.media.tumblr.com/fd3402bd7ca9f6d438ecfb2e1e407000/tumblr_mm69ze7d0A1rqd54do1_1280.png

shuriken
02-09-2014, 12:13 AM
I loved Misery. Got to read that book a few months ago and think I might reread it sooner rather than later. I'm just now getting to read a tun of his oldest novels, so yeah I have to agree about Carrie and The Shining. Only read Carrie once back in 2006, and it's high time I gave that one another. I loved it. That one was very short so I flew through it in no time. I liked his afterword in that one. Yeah even though The Green Mile was a bit depressing, it's still a terrific read. I love the serial novel approach he took with it.

I liked that too. for some reason I read it pretty quick, like faster than I would have if it was a novel...

blindturtle02
02-09-2014, 01:59 PM
Green Mile was very addicting. Think I might reread that one after Insomnia. Not sure though. Different Seasons also looks pretty good to me right about now, as do a few short stories. Green Mile usually takes me about a week or less since I read one part a day in the past. It was so very fast paced. I also need to go back and finish The Stand. Started that in Nov but got sidetracked due to a tun of school work.

discordiatookie
02-13-2014, 01:15 PM
New novel released in November! Called 'Revival'.

Posted: February 12th, 2014 9:00:27 am EST

We now have permission to officially announce the release of the novel, Revival, which will be published by Scribner and Hodder & Stoughton on November 11, 2014.

In a small New England town, over half a century ago, a shadow falls over a small boy playing with his toy soldiers. Jamie Morton looks up to see a striking man, the new minister. Charles Jacobs, along with his beautiful wife, will transform the local church. The men and boys are all a bit in love with Mrs. Jacobs; the women and girls feel the same about Reverend Jacobs—including Jamie’s mother and beloved sister, Claire. With Jamie, the Reverend shares a deeper bond based on a secret obsession. When tragedy strikes the Jacobs family, this charismatic preacher curses God, mocks all religious belief, and is banished from the shocked town.
Jamie has demons of his own. Wed to his guitar from the age of 13, he plays in bands across the country, living the nomadic lifestyle of bar-band rock and roll while fleeing from his family’s horrific loss. In his mid-thirties—addicted to heroin, stranded, desperate—Jamie meets Charles Jacobs again, with profound consequences for both men. Their bond becomes a pact beyond even the Devil’s devising, and Jamie discovers that revival has many meanings.

Can't wait! ^_^

(From stephenking.com )

blindturtle02
02-13-2014, 02:04 PM
Oo! I'll have to put that on my audible preorder list as soon as they get permission to list it. He's putting two books out this year? Pretty cool! So we've got Mr. Mercedes due in early June plus Revival in Nov. Can't wait! Thanks for the info, DT. This news, plus Clone Wars lost season coming to Netflix has definitely put some excitement into my Thursday.

discordiatookie
02-14-2014, 01:44 AM
Yep, it's pretty exciting! Two new books this year!

What version of The Stand are/were you reading? I've read both and prefer the Uncut version...

blindturtle02
02-14-2014, 07:12 AM
I'm reading the uncut version. I very much prefer that one. The sceens with The Kid were great. He also added more with Flagg which really creeped me out. That bit about him breaking into that sick guys house, running up the stairs while screaming, and practically landing right on top of him when charging into the bedroom. That'd just about kill me if I were that sick and facing something that evil.

I was stuck with the original several years ago before they finally decided to put the uncut edition out on audio but glad to own it now. They even included his foreword. They do every time anyway but it's still neat to see things like the dedications and such tagged on to the audio versions. Other authors just plain don't care about stuff like that. lol Go figure. He pays careful attention to how they're handling his audiobook productions from what I've heard.

He's even narrated a few titles. Some audiobook readers have really given the guy a hard time about his narration, but I think it's an honor to have an author narrate his work when/if he/she chooses to do so. Although I wonder if he knows that Desperation and The Regulators are the only two novels he's written that somehow got abridged. He's said that he can't stand abridged audiobooks, so wondering if that's slipped by him at some point. I was able to read them through my library for the blind and dyslexic site, but so far the unabridgements haven't made it onto the mainstream audiobook market along with Nightshift and Skeleton Crew in their entirety. Just now discovering those gems as well.

discordiatookie
06-12-2014, 11:02 AM
Oops, my bad, never realised you'd replied about The Stand. Yeah, The Kid's a right evil b*st*rd!

So Mr Mercedes is out, anyone picked it up? I'm getting it for my birthday (which is on Monday) and can't wait to get cracking with it.

Just finished reading 11/22/63 again. Amazing, amazing read. Remember that bit in Friends when Joey's putting the books in the freezer? Wanted to do that with this book - not for the scares but because the ending is so heartbreaking. The feels man, I'm getting them again just thinking about it!

And now that I've got a few days to wait until my next book, I cracked open Nightshift again for some short stories. Started with Last rung on the ladder. Even when he's not writing horror he's great!

blindturtle02
06-12-2014, 11:20 AM
I preordered my copy of Mr. Mercedes on audible and tore through that in about 3 or so days when it hit my online library. I'm not much for crime novels, but I really liked this one. Nothing supernatural about it, but it still captivated me. My future father-in-law loves crime novels, so my better half and I got it for him in hard back for Father's Day. Ya know, I was thinking about reading Nightshift again soon. Summer seems like a great time for short stories. I was actually introduced to his writing via short stories.

RaphAndDonnie
06-13-2014, 02:26 PM
I've become a pretty big King fan within the last couple of months. Currently I'm reading through Carrie and Misery and when I'm done with them I'm moving on to IT, The Shining and, when I get an iTunes card, I'm going to buy Mr. Mercedes.

pennydreadful
06-13-2014, 06:29 PM
So what's the first Stephen King novel that everybody read? Mine was Carrie.

blindturtle02
06-13-2014, 11:01 PM
Hmm, mine was Needful Things: The Last Castle Rock Story. Yeah, ironic. I actually read a few short story collections before getting into the novels.

discordiatookie
06-14-2014, 05:13 AM
He is a short story master!

My first King book was Desperation. It was '97, I was 14 and it was amazing!

blindturtle02
06-14-2014, 12:38 PM
Hang on a sec. Yeah, mine was also Desperation! I forgot that I picked it up in early Nov of 96. Sigh, must be getting old. I was around 13. I got Needful Things during my annual Thanksgiving visit to Memphis when we were shopping in a Davis-Kidd bookstore on Black Friday of that same year. So NF was actually my second.

Dawnatello Turtle Chick
06-16-2014, 11:20 PM
I believe mine was Cujo, closely followed by Firestarter, Pet Sematary.

blindturtle02
06-17-2014, 08:40 AM
I can remember flying through Cujo in hs years ago. It wasn't available on audio in the main stream market, so I had to get most of his older stuff from national library service for the blind. Totally wasn't expecting Cujo to end the way it did. Still enjoyed it though. Pet Sem is terrific. I think I saw the movie before reading that one. They didn't change very much at all in the film adaptation. Still need to get around to seeing the film version of Shawshank Redemption. I liked the novella quite a bit.