PDA

View Full Version : question about using oven-bake clay to customize a figure


JonesyKitty
08-29-2014, 07:09 PM
I have a question regarding the way others use oven-bake clay for customizing figures. I regularly use Sculpey oven bake clay for sculpting small figurines or pieces that won't be able to move, but I am wanting to make a Neca style Foot solider out of an old Spider-Man figure. I could completely sculpt it or use air dry but neither of those are working for me. What I am wondering is is it safe to sculpt on to the figure and bake it? I know that's kind of a stupid question but I've heard some people do it and am just wary to try. Also does boiling work? I appreciate any tips and help.

arkangel
08-30-2014, 02:19 AM
Dude...
Do not bake your figure and stop using Sculpey. It's for kid's crafts and isn't designed for what you want to do. Get some Aves Apoxisculpt and you'll make an awesome foot soldier out of your Spidey figure. Check out the FigureRealm forums too for some great customizing tips and techniques and good luck with your project. :)

Discogod
08-30-2014, 04:10 AM
By all means, use Sculpey for your customs - if you want them to crumble into dust within a couple of years. It's just not made to last. Like arkangel says, Apoxie Sculpt is the best sculpting medium for customizing, but it is rather expensive - a good alternative is Milliput, much cheaper, although not quite as smooth and a little trickier to get good results with.

JonesyKitty
08-30-2014, 12:52 PM
Awesome thank you both a ton I appreciate it!

psychoandy
08-30-2014, 01:11 PM
I have used Sculpey III on my customs for over a decade, and have never had a problem with anything crumbling and turning into dust.

I don't bake my customs, though. I either use a lighter (for smaller areas), or boil the figure. Bought a specific Sculpey-boiling pot for that, so I didn't ever accidentally poison myself.

But, by all means, do whatever you're most comfortable with.

JonesyKitty
08-30-2014, 01:27 PM
I have used Sculpey III on my customs for over a decade, and have never had a problem with anything crumbling and turning into dust.

I don't bake my customs, though. I either use a lighter (for smaller areas), or boil the figure. Bought a specific Sculpey-boiling pot for that, so I didn't ever accidentally poison myself.

But, by all means, do whatever you're most comfortable with.

so it is safe to boil the figure with sculpey on it then? I never thought to use a lighter that's a really good idea for small stuff

psychoandy
08-30-2014, 05:33 PM
Sure it's safe. It's water. As long as your figure isn't going to get destroyed by water, go ahead.

Bring the water to a boil, and have a pair of tongs ready. Once the water is boiling, use the tongs to carefully place the figure in the water.

Leave them in there for about 5 or 6 minutes and use the tongs to remove them. The original figure's plastic will be soft, but that's not a problem as long as you don't force them to stand under their own weight.

I generally then place the figure on their back (or face-down, if I've sculpted the back) in the freezer for about 5-10 minutes -- Long enough to let the figure cool down, but not long enough for the water to freeze. Then give the figure a good while to thaw out and let any water that's gotten inside to escape.

Note that because of the constantely-moving nature of boiling water, some details may become very slightly warped. Nothing TOO serious, but if you want to make sure that, for example, very thin strands of hair flow in a particular direction, you may want to sculpt that detail AFTER boiling any larger stuff, and use a lighter for the smaller detail. But for larger areas, it's fine, and you don't have to worry about accidentally melting your figure in the oven.

A note about using lighters on Sculpey -- DO NOT hold the lighter on the sculpted area for too long, or you're going to char the outside of what you just scupted, and then you'll have to do it over again. Rather, hold the lighter a few inches away from the figure for a second, then turn the lighter off. Do this a few times until the area is hardened.

JonesyKitty
08-30-2014, 06:26 PM
Sure it's safe. It's water. As long as your figure isn't going to get destroyed by water, go ahead.

Bring the water to a boil, and have a pair of tongs ready. Once the water is boiling, use the tongs to carefully place the figure in the water.

Leave them in there for about 5 or 6 minutes and use the tongs to remove them. The original figure's plastic will be soft, but that's not a problem as long as you don't force them to stand under their own weight.

I generally then place the figure on their back (or face-down, if I've sculpted the back) in the freezer for about 5-10 minutes -- Long enough to let the figure cool down, but not long enough for the water to freeze. Then give the figure a good while to thaw out and let any water that's gotten inside to escape.

Note that because of the constantely-moving nature of boiling water, some details may become very slightly warped. Nothing TOO serious, but if you want to make sure that, for example, very thin strands of hair flow in a particular direction, you may want to sculpt that detail AFTER boiling any larger stuff, and use a lighter for the smaller detail. But for larger areas, it's fine, and you don't have to worry about accidentally melting your figure in the oven.

A note about using lighters on Sculpey -- DO NOT hold the lighter on the sculpted area for too long, or you're going to char the outside of what you just scupted, and then you'll have to do it over again. Rather, hold the lighter a few inches away from the figure for a second, then turn the lighter off. Do this a few times until the area is hardened.

Awesome thank you so much for the tips I am going to try this :)

connor_obain
08-31-2014, 01:21 PM
I have used ovan bake polymer clay (Fimo) for puppets and figurines for years and never had any problems. although i am new to custom action figures I have been using it for smaller details and gluing it on or sculpting miliput around it