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Prowler
01-08-2015, 08:34 PM
So, when did you stop reading comic books and comic strips and got into "real" books? As in novels. Most likely from reading a book or two that you happened to like a lot, I'm guessing. But how long have you been reading books for leisure on a regular basis? And how did it all begin?

I was one of those kids who hated books without pictures. School made reading a chore and I didn't care much for the books I read for class. This turns off a lot of people from reading. Schools shoving books down kids' throats doesn't really help turning them into readers, from my experience. Ask your former HS and college/university classmates how many books they read a year. Most will probably tell you they haven't picked up a fiction book since their student years... unless they're English majors or something, obviously.

Having family members that love reading might help I suppose, but my mom mostly reads "whodunnit" crime books. Not a fan of that genre.

I started to get interested in reading books back in 2011, I think. Only truly began reading several a year in 2012. Only reason I don't read more fiction is due to all the reading I have to do for university. So it's mostly reserved for summer break.

So, what's your story?

blindturtle02
01-08-2015, 08:49 PM
It was around 1990 and I was a first grader. I was wanting to read some chapter books and the library for the blind just happened to have the original movie novelization of TMNT in braille. So I checked it out, devoured it in a weekend or so, and there ya go. I guess it was the junior novel by B.B. Hiller. It's been ages though. So I'm not sure if the author wrote two versions or what. But yeah, TMNT was my first chapter book.

Prowler
01-08-2015, 08:51 PM
It was around 1990 and I was a first grader. I was wanting to read some chapter books and the library for the blind just happened to have the original movie novelization of TMNT in braille. So I checked it out, devoured it in a weekend or so, and there ya go. I guess it was the junior novel by B.B. Hiller. It's been ages though. So I'm not sure if the author wrote two versions or what. But yeah, TMNT was my first chapter book.
You're blind? Damn, that sucks. :(

Is it hard to find books in braille?

blindturtle02
01-08-2015, 09:24 PM
lol Aw it's cool. If you're born with it, it's pretty much as natural as breathing. Oh heck yeah, braille is super expensive, but I subscribe to a site called bookshare.org which gets permission from a tun of authors to upload their books in order to listen to them via a screen reader or read them via refreshable braille display. Authors get a large percentage of the profits, I think. I pay about $50 a year to be a member, but it's worth it since I enjoy reading so much. Kinda like Kindle, I guess. Oh, and braille books are friggin huge. A single novel may take up 3 or 4 books. Stephen King is more like 12. It's also very expensive to produce, costing around $30 to $50 per novel. Well, at least it did when I was a kid. Now I just save a book to flashdrive, read it, and have tuns of shelf space for action figures and vehicles in the bargain. I also love audible.com. I get my book fix either way.

pennydreadful
01-08-2015, 09:27 PM
I've always loved reading. It was a hobby that was encouraged in my house by my mother (though she got annoyed with it when I was in my teens because I never wanted to go out and socialize - she used to say "You can't go through your whole life with your nose stuck in a book!").

But yeah. I pretty much spent the majority of my lunch hours at school in the library. There was a library within walking distance of my house as well... so I've never really not been a reader. It's one of my favorite pastimes - I never leave the house without having a book with me in my bag, just in case.

Toitlefan
01-08-2015, 09:30 PM
I did the whole thing a little backwards I suppose. During highschool and college I took various literature courses purely out of interest. I've always enjoyed everything from Shakespeare to old sci-fi stories. I didn't start getting into comics or following the turtles until my late 20s. In all honesty, the "real" literature and art is what got me interested in the stories of TMNT. Of course it helped that as a kid I watched the show and played with the toys.

DarkFell
01-08-2015, 09:37 PM
I just got interested right around first grade, much like blindturtle02 did. My step-mom gave away most of my "kid books" because I was "too old to be keeping them." *However she let me keep my Dr. Seuss books. Go figure.* My first fave book was Charlotte's Web. It has illustrations inside but they aren't on every page. Read other novels since.

And I still read comic books and comic strips too.

blindturtle02
01-08-2015, 10:04 PM
I just got interested right around first grade, much like blindturtle02 did. My step-mom gave away most of my "kid books" because I was "too old to be keeping them." *However she let me keep my Dr. Seuss books. Go figure.* My first fave book was Charlotte's Web. It has illustrations inside but they aren't on every page. Read other novels since.

And I still read comic books and comic strips too.

Charlotte's Web was actually the second novel I read after TMNT. That old 70s film based on the book was what got me interested.

MsMarvelDuckie
01-08-2015, 10:30 PM
I just got interested right around first grade, much like blindturtle02 did. My step-mom gave away most of my "kid books" because I was "too old to be keeping them." *However she let me keep my Dr. Seuss books. Go figure.* My first fave book was Charlotte's Web. It has illustrations inside but they aren't on every page. Read other novels since.

And I still read comic books and comic strips too.


Hey! That was one of my first "real" books, too! My mom had a copy (probably similar to yours) that she gave to me, and it was my favorite book as a kid. I sent it as a gift to my daughter in Iowa when she was old enough for it a few years ago- it still has the faceplate with my mom's and my names on it, and even has our old address from the house I grew up in on the inside cover. So she'll always have something personal of mine. She's the third generation of our family to have that copy, and I hope she treasures it as much as I did.


Charlotte's Web was actually the second novel I read after TMNT. That old 70s film based on the book was what got me interested.


I was a lot like you, BT. my mom taught me to read at a very young age, so I was already way ahead of the rest of the kids in kindergarten and first grade when they started out with the beginning readers books. I always wanted to skip ahead to harder books, but they would never let me. But later I started reading stuff on my own, and my mom had an entire room full of books for me to go through. I ended up reading most of them before I was even in fifth grade! She's the one I credit with(blame?) my love of reading and learning in general, but I started with novels and literature LONG before I got into comics.

Truth be told, instead of going from comics to Shakespeare and Dumas, I went the other way around. I was reading classic, serious literature when I was still in elementary school, like the Sherlock Holmes collection, Jules Verne, and Edgar Allan Poe. Didn't even get into comics more than as a casual, occasional thing until very late in 2001, when I read the 9-11 tribute issue of Amazing Spider-Man in a TPB. I was so moved by it that I almost cried, and actually DID cry at the issue in the same volume where Peter's Aunt May finally learned his secret and confronted him about it. I'd never even known comic could be so serious and mature until then. My mom DID give me a few of her old comics when I was little, but there were only about five or six, and I was never really into them much- except the graphic novel version of The Secret of NIMH movie. That was another of my favorites growing up. So I guess I'm just really lucky that I have had a chance to read all across the spectrum throughout my life.

Storm Eagle
01-08-2015, 10:46 PM
School made reading a chore and I didn't care much for the books I read for class. This turns off a lot of people from reading. Schools shoving books down kids' throats doesn't really help turning them into readers, from my experience. Ask your former HS and college/university classmates how many books they read a year. Most will probably tell you they haven't picked up a fiction book since their student years... unless they're English majors or something, obviously.



I kind of agree with you there. I didn't really enjoy most of the books that I was made to read in school. In fact, I didn't really read much from the books I was made to read during school. It was different when I had to read books for the summer though. Even so, I think what helped me keep a somewhat substantial interest in reading was how my third and fourth grade teachers read parts of books to us near the end of class. I remember my fourth grade teacher reading Sideways Stories from Wayside School with us, and the variety of characters really interested me. I bought a copy of it when I was in sixth grade as well as its sequel, and got the third installment when I was a freshman in college. I still have all three books to this day.

I also remember when they had that thing in schools where you could order books from some company. Every now and then, the teacher would give us this flyer and they'd have all these books that you can buy. I always took advantage of that and I still have a few of those books.

There would also be times where I'd receive books as gifts, and I'd read them if I found them interested enough. Some I didn't get around to reading until much later, but I still found them to be good books.

You say that assigned reading from schools tends to turn kids off to reading, but there's one book in particular that I was made to read that's still a classic to me. It's S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders. My high school assigned books to read for the summer, and that was one of the books I was made to read during the summer before I started my freshman year. I've heard of the book before then, and it was the first book out of the four that were assigned to me, and it really drew me in. I actually still have my copy. There's this other book that I was made to read the summer between my sophomore and junior years. It was also a good book, but my cousin lost it somewhere in her house when I lent it to her, and I unfortunately don't remember its title. It was one of many books I lent to her, and she lost them all. To make matters worse, some of them were gifts.

I try to find good books to read, but it can be hard. You usually have to go by recommendations from others. I bought a copy of The Casual Vacancy since I read all the Harry Potter books, but I didn't like that one too tough. It was a struggle for me to read since the characters didn't interest me at all. I really wanted to finish it anyway, but after a while, I decided I had enough, and looked it up on Wikipedia to see what happens to all the characters. So now I'm considering getting a library card so I can rent books from the library. Then I can see if I might enjoy them enough to own my own copy.

Prowler
01-08-2015, 11:46 PM
In many cases it does. After all, who likes being forced to read books they don't like? But I'm sure some people got into literature thanks to a particular teacher they had who might have influenced them. But most of the time, their passion for books seems to be rooted in their parents having vast collections of books and getting them to read since they're small.

Although despite not being into "heavy literature" and novels in general, I did like and read a lot of comic strips, Disney comic books and Franco-Belgian comic books as a kid. Also, it's funny how I had such an aversion to books without pictures for so long when I was that kid who wrote the longest compositions in class and enjoyed reading long articles on magazines and newspapers.

A bad book or two can turn off someone from further readings. And even if you're interested in becoming an avid reader, it's hard to know where to start, since going to a bookstore without having the faint idea what you're looking for can be quite overwhelming.

Try to stick to genres and themes you like. Also, if you like a certain author, try to find authors similar to that one.

pennydreadful
01-09-2015, 03:59 AM
Oh my gosh, Storm Eagle - I love The Outsiders. :)

I think there's some sort of rule that schools generally have to assign quite boring books - I know I never got anything that I particularly enjoyed other than George Orwell's Animal Farm. Other than that, it was just the rote sort of stuff - To Kill A Mockingbird, The Great Gatsby, that kind of thing. I actually got assigned To Kill A Mockingbird twice - once at two of the different high-schools I went to; I asked the teacher to give me something different the second time just so I didn't have to write another assignment on it.

I don't care how old I get; I still enjoy reading children's books like Black Beauty and Anne of Green Gables. It's like revisiting an old friend.

Duckie, have you ever read any of the Sevenwaters novels by Juliet Marillier?

DarkFell
01-09-2015, 04:21 AM
For those of you that did read Charlotte's Web, kudos. And I totally understand if you cried for Charlotte.
I need to buy another copy of the book because I read mine until it fell apart.

I also wanna replace my Memoirs of a Geisha book because it also is a paper back and I still read what's left of it.

blindturtle02
01-09-2015, 07:30 AM
Oh heck yeah, I cried for that spider. I'm not going to lie about that. I've been an avid reader of Star Wars novels for years now and I also cried when they killed off Chewie, but I'm glad that's just EU stuff. Whenever I've had braille anything, I've worn it out. That's why I like dots that pop up on a tactile display better. Ya can't wear those out. At least I don't think you can.

Yeah I was reading a tun in elementary as well. I was the kid who liked being assigned books outside of class, but I wasn't a Martin Prince kind of kid who would remind the teacher about tests and such. I didn't want my head and my butt to change places.

I still remember going into book stores and seeing most of the audiobooks abridged, which was always disappointing. They tell you they don't cut much out, but they left ya with around 100 pages of a 400/500 page novel when they got through with it. It's awesome to be reading books in their entirety these days.

Storm Eagle
01-09-2015, 01:59 PM
A bad book or two can turn off someone from further readings. And even if you're interested in becoming an avid reader, it's hard to know where to start, since going to a bookstore without having the faint idea what you're looking for can be quite overwhelming.

Try to stick to genres and themes you like. Also, if you like a certain author, try to find authors similar to that one.

Someone told me yesterday that he doesn't read much because he finds most books to be boring, although he enjoys fantasy books such as the Harry Potter series. I told him that perhaps he just hasn't read the right books. It's like playing video games and watching movies. There will be those that you like, and those you don't.

You mentioned something about reading non-picture books. I think the first children's book I've read that lacks pictures was Sixth Grade Secrets. It's from the author of Sideways Stories from Wayside School, and that's Louis Sachar. I read Sixth Grade Secrets for pleasure when I was in the fourth grade.

Oh my gosh, Storm Eagle - I love The Outsiders. :)

I think there's some sort of rule that schools generally have to assign quite boring books - I know I never got anything that I particularly enjoyed other than George Orwell's Animal Farm. Other than that, it was just the rote sort of stuff - To Kill A Mockingbird, The Great Gatsby, that kind of thing. I actually got assigned To Kill A Mockingbird twice - once at two of the different high-schools I went to; I asked the teacher to give me something different the second time just so I didn't have to write another assignment on it.

I don't care how old I get; I still enjoy reading children's books like Black Beauty and Anne of Green Gables. It's like revisiting an old friend.

Duckie, have you ever read any of the Sevenwaters novels by Juliet Marillier?

Have you ever read That Was Then, This is Now? That's the sequel to The Outsiders. It's not as good, but you should still try it out.

Someone also told me yesterday that children's books are the best, although she's actually the second person to ever tell me that.

MsMarvelDuckie
01-09-2015, 06:37 PM
Oh my gosh, Storm Eagle - I love The Outsiders. :)

I think there's some sort of rule that schools generally have to assign quite boring books - I know I never got anything that I particularly enjoyed other than George Orwell's Animal Farm. Other than that, it was just the rote sort of stuff - To Kill A Mockingbird, The Great Gatsby, that kind of thing. I actually got assigned To Kill A Mockingbird twice - once at two of the different high-schools I went to; I asked the teacher to give me something different the second time just so I didn't have to write another assignment on it.

I don't care how old I get; I still enjoy reading children's books like Black Beauty and Anne of Green Gables. It's like revisiting an old friend.

Duckie, have you ever read any of the Sevenwaters novels by Juliet Marillier?


I never cared for most of those, either. Animal Farm seemed too preachy to me, but I LOVED Lord of the Flies. Alas, Babylon was pretty good, too, but I didn't start getting into really interesting books in school until my Junior year of high school, when our theme for the year was archetypes and the "dark side of man", and we dug into classics like Dracula, Frankenstein, Jeckel/Hyde, and Dorian Grey. We also got to read some Grimm Fairy Tales in their ORIGINAL versions, among other dark and macabre stuff. THAT was a fun year.

No, penny, I've not heard of those, and I never got into Anne of Green Gables, either, TBH. I loved Black Beauty, Misty of Chincoteague, and Walter Farley's Black Stallion series, though. One of my other favorites was Big Red, which was a novel about Man O' War, and another called King of the Wind, about one of the three ancestor Arabians from which the Thoroughbred race breed originated. Obviously, I loved horse stories as a kid.


Oh heck yeah, I cried for that spider. I'm not going to lie about that. I've been an avid reader of Star Wars novels for years now and I also cried when they killed off Chewie, but I'm glad that's just EU stuff.


Ah, yeah- I actually cried and then put the book down when I read that part in Vector Prime! Shame on (my then fave) author R A Salvatore for killing off the Wookie! I never could finish that book after that, and it kind of killed any interest in the SW EU I had. I mean, sure it was a heroic death, but ya just DON'T kill off the walking carpet!! I've heard he even got death threats in his mail for that, and he fully admits to getting lots of hate mail- and that he's almost as well known for killing Chewie as he is for creating my favorite fantasy character of Drizzt Do' Urden!

snake
01-09-2015, 07:32 PM
Goosebumps books. Those were great.

Venom
01-09-2015, 07:39 PM
I've always been weird when it came to books.

When I was very young, around 2 or 3, I would memorize my Little Golden Books by listening to mom read them, then soon after really could read them. From there, I graduated up to result the old World Books, Encyclopedia Britannica, and my favorite: The American Medical Association's Home Medical Encyclopedia!!

Yeah, my mom was thoroughly surprised when I proudly exclaimed, "So that's where I came from!" as I read about pregnancy and such. :lol:

Anyhoo, I don't believe I read a "proper" novel until 6th grade, when I read a Goosebumps book.

It's a hobby in which interest, like the tide, ebbs in my life. I love sci-fi and thought provoking stories, along with high adventure tripe and crime/mystery/suspense.

Like I said: weird. I am a Pisces, however...

pennydreadful
01-09-2015, 07:56 PM
Someone told me yesterday that he doesn't read much because he finds most books to be boring, although he enjoys fantasy books such as the Harry Potter series. I told him that perhaps he just hasn't read the right books. It's like playing video games and watching movies. There will be those that you like, and those you don't.

...

Have you ever read That Was Then, This is Now? That's the sequel to The Outsiders. It's not as good, but you should still try it out.

Someone also told me yesterday that children's books are the best, although she's actually the second person to ever tell me that.

I wasn't huge on That Was Then, This is Now... or Rumble Fish. I thought that Tex was probably Hinton's strongest novel other than The Outsiders.

I definitely don't understand people who say books are boring - like... how can you say that? Have you read every book? I firmly believe that there's a book out there for everyone. You just have to keep trying til you find the right one that unlocks your love of reading.

No, penny, I've not heard of those, and I never got into Anne of Green Gables, either, TBH. I loved Black Beauty, Misty of Chincoteague, and Walter Farley's Black Stallion series, though. One of my other favorites was Big Red, which was a novel about Man O' War, and another called King of the Wind, about one of the three ancestor Arabians from which the Thoroughbred race breed originated. Obviously, I loved horse stories as a kid.

You may want to check out the Sevenwaters series - it's basically a Celtic retelling of the fairytale The Six Swans... it's a really good read, IMO. What do you think of Marion Zimmer Bradley's Avalon series?

I was obsessed with books about horses as well. :lol: If it had a horse in it, I read it. Oh god, I just remembered... I had like the entire collection of the original The Saddle Club books as well. :oops: And I was so crazy about The Silver Brumby series... I don't know if The Silver Brumby is really well-known overseas, but they're an Australian series (they also did a movie starring Russell Crowe which totally sucked).

Goosebumps books. Those were great.

Hells yeah - The Werewolf of Fever Swamp was always my fave! :D

MsMarvelDuckie
01-09-2015, 11:56 PM
Sounds interesting, and I do love all things Celtic. As for Bradley, I've only read a few of her books. I never go around to the Avalon books, though my mom has some of them. I was quite fond of her Sword and Sorceress anthology series for a few years. Had some great aspiring authors in those.

TBH, my interest in fantasy has been on the wane for a couple of years, as I've mostly been rekindling my love for TMNT, and working on some of my own projects. I DO have a fantasy series I've been working on, set in my own fantasy/game world based within the D&D cosmology/multiverse. It's about a young dark elf who becomes a bard and escapes his homeland in search of a new life and an elusive piece of music said to have been used by the gods to create the world. He's also been blessed by the goddess he follows, a deity of music, dance, and swordsmanship, as well as being a minor moon goddess. I've mostly been concentrating on the third book, which is really where most of the main action takes place- the first and second ones are sort of about how he got to where he is.

Having left home at a young age due to some horrible events in his past, he is basically an outcast and enemy in the eyes of most of the people he meets, due to his heritage. Along the way, he gets framed for murder, narrowly escapes his sadistic sister who is hunting him down to drag him back home, meets a pair of twins who are the children of an elf/dragon mix (and promptly falls in love with one of them), and gets chased by bounty-hunters, local authorities, and the above twins, and even fakes his own death. Basically it's a fun adventure romp with some dark undertones and a lot of hack-n-slash and magic. The half-dragon twins are an odd pair, too, as the female is a sorceress and bard herself, while her brother is a holy knight of one of the chief gods- who happens to HATE dark elves. His sister falls for the bard, which irks him to no end.

The second book is about his childhood and adolescent years, and is much darker and more graphic. The kid gets routinely neglected or verbally abused and even hit by his fanatically evil high priestess mother, ignored by his pirate-king father, tormented by his half sister (the same one who tries to take him back in the aforementioned tale) and abused on SEVERAL levels by his tutors. And then goes off to a military academy as part of being groomed to take his place at his father's side as future king of their society, only to end up being treated as a piece of meat by every noble-blooded female who so much as looks his way because males are considered "beneath" the women in their clergy-run society. (There's a simmering civil war between his father's faction which is currently in greater power, and the female dominant clergy of their evil spider goddess, but he's stuck in the middle, since the old rules of the clerics still mostly hold sway.) And he's in love with his surrogate mother, an elven slave woman belonging to his father, which makes their being together a BIG no-no.

As for the first book, it's all about the father of the main "hero", and how he came to be where he was, a la Darth Vader. He was born and raised as a "light elf", but committed some heinous crimes that led to his being cursed and banished to become a "dark elf" or drow. Sort of a prequel to the main storyline.

Peanut
01-10-2015, 12:56 AM
So...real talk. The school I went to from K-1 was...pretty abhorrent. I can't recall ever even being handed a book or suggested to read at that age at school. My mom read to me and taught me to read at that age, but I never got out of simple reading in grade 1, which is absolutely f*cking ridiculous. I can recall having "reading buddies" in Grade 1, who were two much older girls who spent their time with me chatting and/or pinching and kissing my cheeks, which not only meant I was learning absolutely nothing, but that my interest in reading was pretty much nonexistent.

I moved before grade 2 and it was immediately brought to the schools attention that I f*cking suuuuuucked at reading. I took a special class instead of having lunch break for the majority of that year and by the end of grade 2 I was reading books meant for much higher reading levels. By grade 3 I was reading high school material and from then on I was just always way into reading.

I obviously read a lot more nonsense fantasy/sci-fi when I was younger, which is something I grew out of in high school, but I do still have a soft spot for semi-trashy fantasy literature like the RA Salvatore Drizzt stuff and Dragonlance, despite not reading any of it for a decade. That said, I find it hard to get into a lot of books people seem to love, even if I can tell it's well written and potentially interesting.

I've read a lot less in the past several years, because my fiance is an awful sleeper who needs absolute darkness and silence to sleep and she always goes to bed long before I can even begin to think about sleeping, so the option of going to bed and turning on a light to read without getting kicked out of the room are slim. I have an old model Kobo, which has no backlight and thus is impossible to read in the dark, so I'm thinking of investing in a Kindle to get me back into reading on a more regular basis.

pennydreadful
01-10-2015, 01:21 AM
@ Marvel - wow, that sounds pretty intense. How long have you been working on it for?

If you ever want to check out any other MZB stuff, I highly recommend The Firebrand. It's a retelling of The Iliad from the perspective of Kassandra, who was the prophetess cursed to be able to see the future but never to be believed. It's a lot less fantasy-based than her other books but the protagonist is strong and likeable, rather than being written as a weak lunatic.

@ Peanut - I've got a Kindle of my own and can't say enough good things about it. I used to be one of the old-guard "It's not the same as a real book - I need to be able to smell the paper!" but really, in retrospect I was just being full of sh*t. :lol:

It's a great way to try out new books before deciding if I want to get a physical copy of them, and getting Kindle versions of stuff is a lot cheaper than buying from a bookstore as well. You can fit literally hundreds of books on them, and it's a great way to stockpile stuff for your reading list. Also an excellent way of having multiple books with you when you don't know what you're in the mood for reading.

I've got the Kindle Paperwhite, which has a backlit screen and I've found that the battery lasts quite well compared to previous models. So IMO, a Kindle is definitely a worthwhile investment, if it's something you're thinking about.

BubblyShell22
01-10-2015, 03:18 PM
I've been an avid reader all my life and still read to this day. I was reading at a sixth grade level by third grade, which was amazing. One of my favorite series I used to read was The Indian in the Cupboard series as I thought it was awesome. Also loved the Sideways Stories series, too. Nowadays, I'm obsessed with the Pretty Little Liars series, mainly due to the TV show that got me interested in the books. Also love Mary Higgins Clark and her daughter Carol Higgins Clark, too. When I was in high school I was obsessed with V.C. Andrews after having to do a book report in high school and choosing one of the books in the Orphans miniseries.

MsMarvelDuckie
01-10-2015, 07:08 PM
@ Marvel - wow, that sounds pretty intense. How long have you been working on it for?

If you ever want to check out any other MZB stuff, I highly recommend The Firebrand. It's a retelling of The Iliad from the perspective of Kassandra, who was the prophetess cursed to be able to see the future but never to be believed. It's a lot less fantasy-based than her other books but the protagonist is strong and likeable, rather than being written as a weak lunatic.

@ Peanut - I've got a Kindle of my own and can't say enough good things about it. I used to be one of the old-guard "It's not the same as a real book - I need to be able to smell the paper!" but really, in retrospect I was just being full of sh*t. :lol:

It's a great way to try out new books before deciding if I want to get a physical copy of them, and getting Kindle versions of stuff is a lot cheaper than buying from a bookstore as well. You can fit literally hundreds of books on them, and it's a great way to stockpile stuff for your reading list. Also an excellent way of having multiple books with you when you don't know what you're in the mood for reading.

I've got the Kindle Paperwhite, which has a backlit screen and I've found that the battery lasts quite well compared to previous models. So IMO, a Kindle is definitely a worthwhile investment, if it's something you're thinking about.


Off and on for the last ten years or so. Believe it or not, it started as a simple backstory idea for one of my D&D NPC's, and just grew from that. I thought it would be fun to write an entire novel about him and the twins (they were also some characters I ran) and then went backward into the origin tale of both father and son. His dad is really a nasty piece of work, having murdered his two brothers and driven his sister to suicide, murdered his father, and his own wife as well. And all this was BEFORE getting cursed (actually, it's WHY he was cursed/banished). Then he takes up piracy (and slave-trading!) and builds his own fleet, makes an alliance with a bunch of other disenfranchised noble dark elf guys, and proceeds to stage a coup of their entire system of government. The kid is born later.


I also have a basic Kindle, but I think I may have to get a new one, as mine just does not want to turn on, despite having been recharged recently. I can't get into any of the books I have on it, which sucks, because I have several really good reference books on it, including the Egyptian Book of the Dead and several books on Japanese culture, mythology, and ghost stories!

Storm Eagle
01-11-2015, 12:03 AM
I wasn't huge on That Was Then, This is Now... or Rumble Fish. I thought that Tex was probably Hinton's strongest novel other than The Outsiders.

I definitely don't understand people who say books are boring - like... how can you say that? Have you read every book? I firmly believe that there's a book out there for everyone. You just have to keep trying til you find the right one that unlocks your love of reading.



I've only seen the movie Rumble Fish. I've never read the book. Tex was one of the books assigned to me for summer reading between my freshman and sophomore years of high school. I believe it was also one of the books I lent to my cousin that she lost in her house somewhere.

Some people will say that they don't have time to read. When I told someone about that, the person told me that it's because they're just busy watching TV. I watch TV too, and I have cable, and I play video games and rent movies. So I figured I'd try being more well-rounded by fitting reading into my life every now and then. Lord knows Harry Potter has kept me busy up until the seventh and final book. In fact, I only started reading that in 2002. They were only up to the fourth book at the time. I could have just only bought the first book, but I decided to go all in and buy all of the first four.

In 2005, I decided to order a Chronicles of Narnia set. I read all the books in it, and even though it seemed like a nice series, it didn't seem like a series I'd revisit. So I sold that set.

I saw a guy from England say that he was bullied simply because he liked to read. He was always seen with some sort of reading material, and his peers didn't take to that very well since most of them were either into soccer or drinking. On top of all this, he was an unwanted kid whose mother was very abusive towards him.



@ Peanut - I've got a Kindle of my own and can't say enough good things about it. I used to be one of the old-guard "It's not the same as a real book - I need to be able to smell the paper!" but really, in retrospect I was just being full of sh*t. :lol:

It's a great way to try out new books before deciding if I want to get a physical copy of them, and getting Kindle versions of stuff is a lot cheaper than buying from a bookstore as well. You can fit literally hundreds of books on them, and it's a great way to stockpile stuff for your reading list. Also an excellent way of having multiple books with you when you don't know what you're in the mood for reading.

I've got the Kindle Paperwhite, which has a backlit screen and I've found that the battery lasts quite well compared to previous models. So IMO, a Kindle is definitely a worthwhile investment, if it's something you're thinking about.

I still prefer to buy physical books, but I was glad to read about how you find a Kindle to be beneficial to you.

I've been an avid reader all my life and still read to this day. I was reading at a sixth grade level by third grade, which was amazing. One of my favorite series I used to read was The Indian in the Cupboard series as I thought it was awesome. Also loved the Sideways Stories series, too. Nowadays, I'm obsessed with the Pretty Little Liars series, mainly due to the TV show that got me interested in the books. Also love Mary Higgins Clark and her daughter Carol Higgins Clark, too. When I was in high school I was obsessed with V.C. Andrews after having to do a book report in high school and choosing one of the books in the Orphans miniseries.

I received The Indian in the Cupboard as a gift in 1991, when I was in sixth grade. I didn't read it until 2011 though. I rented the movie that year too, but I can't remember which one I did first.

Since you enjoyed the Sideways Stories series, I thought I'd share a negative review someone gave the first book.

http://www.amazon.com/review/R1NP8OKH9F326U/ref=cm_cr_pr_cmt?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0380731487#wasThisHelpful

So yeah, the character she complains about is clearly an example of how not to be. If you teach your kids well, they'd pick up on that. My fourth grade teacher read it to our class, and I sure got the gist. I have no doubt the others did too. Some people.

pennydreadful
01-11-2015, 01:58 AM
Marvel, I love the Egyptian Book of the Dead! :D:D:D

Another series on my list to read is Manda Scott's Boudica series; I adore anything about Boudica so I'm hoping that it doesn't disappoint.

I still prefer to buy physical books, but I was glad to read about how you find a Kindle to be beneficial to you.

Yeah, if I love a book, I'll still get a physical copy - it's just a good way of saving dropping $25 on a book I haven't read before for it to turn out being crap. So much awful stuff gets published these days - especially in the paranormal genre. :ohwell:

And in case anyone's wondering about the $25 thing... the prices for dvds, cds and books over here are ridiculous.

Leo656
01-11-2015, 02:53 AM
My Dad mostly taught me. From as early as I can remember (which is really far back) he always read to me from books of fairy tales, nursery rhymes, and Superman and Batman comics. I got really good at committing some of it to memory, and he would always laugh and brag to people how I would poke him and remind him if he skipped a part or something. :lol: I also had a TON of those book and cassette kits as a kid, the ones where you'd read along with the tape and turn the page every time it chimed a bell? I had like hundreds of them. I STILL have like 40 of the tapes and a few of the books that didn't fall apart or get given away, all in a box in storage because I can't bear to part with them. :lol: Seriously, other than watch cartoons those things were my LIFE from as far back as I could remember until pretty much Kindergarten. I had every Disney one, every comic-book based one I could find, just a ton of those things. I played them so much the tapes would wear out. Every night I'd stay up late "reading" when I was supposed to be sleeping. Actually, come to think of it... that's never changed. :lol:

So, based on all that kind of influence I was reading at a very high level by the time I started school. I don't think they ever told me because kids aren't supposed to know or whatever, but I remember just constantly hearing my parents brag to everyone who'd listen how far advanced my reading and comprehension skills were. If I had to peg it I'd say maybe I was at about a second-grade level in Kindergarten. Like at age 5 I could read a 32-page comic book cover to cover and tell you the gist of the plot, while most kids that age kind of just look at the pictures.

I definitely thank my parents for getting me that kind of head start. Turns out that's how most kids in my family learned, and even the dumb ones are strong readers, which makes me wonder why it's not some kind of enforced standard for kids across the board. I've found that some people really don't enjoy reading BUT for other people they're just not very good at it and rather than struggle, they avoid it.

As I've gotten older I've started reading more autobiographies and nonfiction. I think because I'm so deluged with fantasy with all the cartoons and video games and movies, and also with comics, that when I sit down to read a Book I'd rather it be something grounded in reality. I also have always been a big magazine guy. There is just a TON of reading material in my house. Just boxes and shelves of books and magazines every damn where. I wouldn't call it my main hobby but it's probably the thing I do most often, if that makes any sense.

And I gotta have physical books. I already stare at a screen too much and it really hurts my eyes and gives me a serious headache. I tend to read a whole book in one sitting, and taking that long of a period staring at a screen would be physically painful for me. I'd save a ton of storage space but I can't do it, literally. I get ill.

DarkFell
01-11-2015, 02:34 PM
Hey Leo, did you have a Teddy Ruxpin too? Thought I'd ask since you have the read-a-long stories on tape.

In case you / anyone forgot about those animatronic talking story tape readers, here's an
image.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515qQsbgoDL._SX425_.jpg
Not picking on anyone here that did; I had one too. That toy actually got me to like learning how to read along with Dr. Seuss.

Leo656
01-11-2015, 02:52 PM
Yeah, briefly, and I loved him dearly, but being too young to know any better I carelessly left him outside one day and he got rained on. Honestly I still feel awful about it. In like 1995 my aunt got one of the newer ones that interacted with VHS tapes - one of the ones it came with, coincidentally enough, being "Planet of the Turtleloids" I believe, from the Fred Wolf TMNT series. :lol: It wasn't quite the same, though. I mean, for one thing instead of reading books to you he just talked over cartoons you were ostensibly trying to watch, and he was also smaller and sounded younger. I'unno, I liked the original better. I really wish I still had mine. I never got Grubby, either. :ohwell:

That's all stuff that's really high up on my "If I ever have a rich relative randomly leave me a huge inheritance/maybe I can con some old lady into leaving me everything in her will" list of Things To Do Someday.

Don Gaddis
01-27-2015, 09:22 PM
I pretty much spent the majority of my lunch hours at school in the library...

During school I was much the same. At lunch, when everyone else headed
into the cafeteria, I ventured into the library instead. And aside from a short story
that I enjoyed by Edgar Allan Poe, I agree with you about reading assignments
in school. Most of the books that we had to read were so conservative
and bland. I grew up in a very conservative, rural, religious area (Bible Belt,
as it is known here in the Southern U.S.), so in school we never really had the
opportunity to explore more adventuresome stories. Usually I never even read
the assigned book... I would just buy the CliffsNotes version that hit all of the
highlights and watch any film adaptation that was available... then I'd go online
and read about the differences between the films and the book, so as not to be
tripped up by that for a test or quiz. Anything was worth not having to read
something such as The Scarlet Letter, which I'm sure is a great book,
but it's an example of something that we were forced to read in high school
that just didn't appeal to me in any way.

My love for books began at a very young age. I loved fairy tales and still do.
Did anyone else here ever read the Serendipity books? They were very popular
during the 80s: short, beautifully illustrated children's books of the fairy tale variety
by the writer/artist combo Stephen Cosgrove and Robin James. I just read Pinocchio,
by Carlo Collodi. Boy, that was interesting (and far removed from the Disney version)!

The first truly adult book that I remember reading? Probably Dracula, by Bram Stoker.
Maybe that was my gateway book. Over the years, I've noticed that I almost always have
to stumble upon a book or discover one on my own. Whenever anyone recommends a book
or someone tries to force a book upon me, that's usually a turn off, and I'm not sure exactly
why. I almost see it as akin to someone trying to tell you what food to eat or what clothes
to wear. It doesn't work that way. Books, by their very nature, are personal and intimate-
each reader views the story from a slightly different perspective and we all have varying
tastes that don't necessarily comply. My niece forced the first Hunger Games book on me
several years ago, and it's still sitting on my nightstand unread. Speaking of, at this point
I just need to give it back to her! I know that she meant well, and I understand how
much it stinks to love a story so much, and you simply want others to love it in the same
way- only to be disappointed when they don't love it as much as you did.

Often, I'll watch a film, and if I really enjoy it, if it was adapted from a written work,
more often than not I'll read the corresponding book or short story. Other times I'll
drift through a bookstore just to see what pops out at me. Browsing through online
forums such as this is another good way to discover good stories. I'll think, oh, that
sounds cool– and then skip over to Amazon to investigate it further.

pennydreadful
01-27-2015, 10:19 PM
I read the Serendipity books as well - they were great!!! I think the first one I ever read was Leo the Lop. :D

I also read an insane amount of Enid Blyton when I was a kid, though I'm sure some of that stuff is dated as hell now.

There's something so relaxing about a library or a bookstore - I don't know if it's the smell of the paper, or knowing that you're surrounded by a room full of old friends and new adventures just waiting to happen, where nobody can bother you... I'm always happy when I'm in a room filled with books.

MsMarvelDuckie
01-27-2015, 11:22 PM
Same here, and I too, love the smell of a library or book store. On a humorous note, my hubby claims it's because I'm getting high on the smell of the glue, or that they put crack or something in the ink- especially in comics!

Don Gaddis
01-28-2015, 10:31 PM
Ha ha! Yes, the smell of books is definitely a warm comfort. I've always loved the
smell of the original Mirage comics too... I don't know if they were printed on the same
type of stock that newspapers were printed on, but whenever a new issue came out,
I'd open it up as if it were a treasure chest and breathe in. Sighhh. Ink. Paper. Glue.
Mmmmmm- yum! :) *laughing.

@ pennydreadful, I don't know if Leo the Lop was my first Serendipity book, but it was
among the first few that I fell in love with. There was one book about a three legged cat
named Fanny that I really liked, and I really enjoyed the ones that featured the unicorn...
I want to say that the unicorn's name was Morgan, but that could be wrong. Alas, it was
many years ago!

Haven't heard of Enid Blyton, but will venture over to Amazon and look the name up...

blindturtle02
01-29-2015, 07:27 AM
Hey Leo, did you have a Teddy Ruxpin too? Thought I'd ask since you have the read-a-long stories on tape.

In case you / anyone forgot about those animatronic talking story tape readers, here's an
image.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515qQsbgoDL._SX425_.jpg
Not picking on anyone here that did; I had one too. That toy actually got me to like learning how to read along with Dr. Seuss.

Holy crap! I had one of those. Teddy was like my security blanket whenever I'd have to go visit my wicked stepmom waaay back in the day. She hated that thing and I'm guessing it was because it comforted me. Ruxpin was undoubtedly my first venture into stories. I remember liking the old TV show too but that's a topic for the TV show thread. Oh, and the mudblups were bada$$ in both story and show.

Storm Eagle
02-02-2015, 10:08 AM
Haven't heard of Enid Blyton, but will venture over to Amazon and look the name up...

She's a British author. Her works probably haven't really gotten around to the US.

pennydreadful
02-02-2015, 03:34 PM
Yeah, I'm not sure how well she's known in the US; she did stuff like Noddy, The Magic Faraway Tree, The Famous Five etc. Recent editions of her books have had to be revised slightly to be appropriate for modern times; given that her books were written from the 30s through to 50s, some of her wording comes off as pretty racist/sexist. Also stuff like changing characters' names from Dick and Fanny to Rick and Frannie. :lol:

Storm Eagle
02-03-2015, 12:24 AM
Yeah, I'm not sure how well she's known in the US; she did stuff like Noddy, The Magic Faraway Tree, The Famous Five etc. Recent editions of her books have had to be revised slightly to be appropriate for modern times; given that her books were written from the 30s through to 50s, some of her wording comes off as pretty racist/sexist. Also stuff like changing characters' names from Dick and Fanny to Rick and Frannie. :lol:

Come to think of it, I remember seeing a Famous Five book on thr shelf of my elementary school's library.

discordiatookie
02-03-2015, 09:40 AM
There were always books around at my house. My mum's an avid reader, and I guess some of it rubbed off on me.

As a kid, I was mad for Enid Blyton (Famous Five & Secret Seven) and Roald Dahl. Then it went Goosebumps, through to Point Horror, then when I hit my teens, James Herbert. I was about 14 when I discovered Stephen King, and my mum and I would get a book each of King's (usually secondhand) and after we were done, swap over and discuss them. It was a great way of bonding.

I also read a lot of comics (still do) - back then mainly the Beano and 2000AD.

Nowadays I'm still Stephen King daft and I always have a book at hand. Right now it's Good Omens by Pratchett/Gaiman (again). If I can't afford a new book, then I just open my cupboard and grab an old one.

Also, my son (2 years old) gets a story read to him every night, complete with funny voices and actions, and he has a fair collection of books himself. Although he does normally go for the same ones again and again (and it does my heart glad to see that two've his favourites are the Chu books by Neil Gaiman :D)

SophieDem
02-03-2015, 10:07 AM
I've been into books since my childhood. At first, in 1st grade I was not an excellent reader but slowly I improved and became good at reading. From that point, I fell in love with books. I've always been that type that likes daydreaming, being creative, have crazy ideas and often find herself in Neverland during the day. I used to borrow or steal my brother's book since he had a lot but I had very few. My grandmother and grandpa told me stories, too, and I was always eager to listen to them.
When I was 13 or 14 my mom threatened me to take away my books due to staying awake until 2am or 3am because of Eragon. :D And that happened not only at once.
Later, in high school it turned out I have a thing for Literature and languages and these babies become my favorite subjects. I could deepen my thoughts and examine how people felt and lived in older eras. I'm just curious about everything and anything. Sometimes it is hard to understand what a poet or writer would like to say but you can find it out if you are willing to try to look more into it. :)
I love history novels, fantasy books and stories that are about samurais, ninjas, ancient Japan and practically Far East. But I'm interested in a lot of stuff. :) Been always curious about comic books but never got them.

senpai
03-02-2015, 11:34 PM
Let me just say Green Eggs and Ham changed my life.

BubblyShell22
03-03-2015, 03:57 PM
Ah, Leo the Lop. I had that book, too, and some others, though I never knew they were called the Serendipity series. There was another book I liked called Whisper the Unicorn that I read all of the time. And I can't forget Dr. Seuss and the Berenstein Bears series. Those books were awesome.

Prowler
08-10-2015, 11:03 AM
Come to think of it, I remember seeing a Famous Five book on thr shelf of my elementary school's library.
I've read a couple of their books as a kid. My mother enjoyed them as a kid, so she figured they'd be good introductory books for a kid. I do recall liking those two books I've read, but don't remember much about them. They were also the first books I've read in English. I was, I think 11 years old at the time.

Original TMNT Cartoon Fan
08-10-2015, 01:50 PM
Tales of Sune
Bert diaries

Still like it. Don't read much other non-fiction.