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View Full Version : Job Hunting after College/Grad School


Spike Spiegel
07-13-2016, 10:50 AM
Do any of you have experience in this area? How long did it take you to land your first full time job? What tips do you have for maintaining your sanity while waiting for companies to get back with you after interviews? :tcool:

The Deadman
07-13-2016, 10:54 AM
Got my first warehousing job after taking a year off from high school, didn't apply, wasn't interviewed, was hired straight on...I guess that's one of the perks working with family.

plastroncafe
07-13-2016, 10:57 AM
If you're able to do so, consider volunteering while you wait.
Especially if you can find opportunities in the field you're looking to break into.

Katie
07-13-2016, 06:15 PM
And don't be too proud to take a low level job in a company or field you like.

My first job out of college was at a mom an pop retail store. Because I had cashier experience I was able to become a teller at a bank. Now I am a vice president at that bank.

I worked my way up like a game of frogger. :P

CyberCubed
07-13-2016, 06:22 PM
I graduated College in 2008 which as you may remember was literally the worst time to be looking for a job. It was the economic crisis and nobody was hiring.

I didn't get a job till a year later, but it didn't hurt me too bad since I was still young at the time (I think I was only 23 back then?) so I lived with my parents for a time until then.

Unlike some people I have tons of money saved up in the bank though, so it didn't affect me badly. I'm thinking about buying a house in the next couple of years, if not next year.

ToTheNines
07-13-2016, 06:26 PM
Smoke weed and drink whiskey.

CyberCubed
07-13-2016, 08:36 PM
I used to apply for hundreds of office jobs and heard nothing, or very little back. Most jobs want you proficient in excel, powerpoint, etc. nowadays which I only have basic knowledge of. Every single job that involves a computer you have to already know what to do from the start or you're not even considered.

Hell if I know some of this computer jargon. I didn't study computer science in college so I only know very basic computer skills. That kind of limits you out of most office work nowadays. I also applied for mailroom and part-time bank jobs and its very rare they even contact you back.

Its amazing how much office work has changed in the last 10 years. If you didn't study it right out of college you're screwed out working in there.

Utrommaniac
07-13-2016, 09:05 PM
With any luck, I should be somewhat okay.

My school is involved with various graphic design firms, which I should have an internship with in my last semester or so. 25% of the last graduating class had full-time jobs the last time I heard.

Katie
07-13-2016, 09:09 PM
Thats not exactly true, Cubed. If you get an entry level job at a company, they're gonna train you on their systems. Don't scare people from trying to better themselves and get a job.

To me, saying "oh they won't hire me because of x" is just an excuse to not even try. If you don't try you have created a self fulfilling prophecy.

The more likely reason that you didn't get alot of call backs is that you are competing with thousands of other people in New York who also want that job, qualified or not. It isn't like that everywhere. AND in my experience, you have to be mobile and be willing to move. If I hadn't been willing to move around the country, I would not have been able to move up like I have.

CyberCubed
07-13-2016, 09:16 PM
Thats not exactly true, Cubed. If you get an entry level job at a company, they're gonna train you on their systems. Don't scare people from trying to better themselves and get a job.

Almost all the job descriptions are the same. 2 years experience in whatever field, and then, "proficient in word, excel, powerpoint, etc." Even the entry level jobs I apply to have some sort of added description like this. I mean I know when you first start a job you'll receive some kind of training and not be expected to know everything right off the bat, but they still expect you to know a great deal. Basically they don't want to work with you from the ground up anymore.

The more likely reason that you didn't get alot of call backs is that you are competing with thousands of other people in New York who also want that job, qualified or not. It isn't like that everywhere. AND in my experience, you have to be mobile and be willing to move. If I hadn't been willing to move around the country, I would not have been able to move up like I have.

Yeah, there's way too many educated people in New York. I'm basically now competing with recent College grads and more experienced people in their 30's and 40's for the same position. I'm basically inbetween everyone else...not a recent College grad but also not old and experienced either.

The thing is wouldn't you expect New York to have I dunno...30,000 jobs or something? I see the same companies put up the same listings time and time again, every month or so, but it seems their positions are never filled or people leave after a month or two.

Prowler
07-13-2016, 09:27 PM
Isn't it normal to get rejected a lot for jobs? Especially when you don't have much experience yet and are applying for something many other people are as well? I remember my brother struggling a lot to find a job in his area after graduating, so he had to get a job outside of his field for a while before he managed to land one in his field.

Katie
07-14-2016, 05:20 AM
It is very normal to get passed over alot. You just have to be persistent. Also, don't expect them to call you if you are passed over. No one has time for that. Give them two weeks from your application then call them to check politely.


On the computer stuff, my experience in both applying and hiring is that when they say they want someone with experience in Word and Excel, all that is needed is basic navigation skills. If you know how to get around in those two, they are going yo train you to do anything more complex.

My final bit of advice here is that after a few years it doesn't matter what your degree was, only what your job history is. If you have a business degree and all you have ever done is construction or Airport security or manual labor....that is what you are alway going to do. That is your experience, so choose jobs wisely.

plastroncafe
07-14-2016, 10:55 AM
^^^
Agreed.
Which is when I'll go and push volunteering again. Because it is possible to get out from one kind of job into another, you just have to show the employer that you've capable of it.

But yeah, be prepared for a lot of No's before you get a Yes.

CylonsKlingonsDaleksOhMy
07-14-2016, 11:09 AM
I used to apply for hundreds of office jobs and heard nothing, or very little back. Most jobs want you proficient in excel, powerpoint, etc. nowadays which I only have basic knowledge of. Every single job that involves a computer you have to already know what to do from the start or you're not even considered.

Hell if I know some of this computer jargon. I didn't study computer science in college so I only know very basic computer skills. That kind of limits you out of most office work nowadays. I also applied for mailroom and part-time bank jobs and its very rare they even contact you back.

Its amazing how much office work has changed in the last 10 years. If you didn't study it right out of college you're screwed out working in there.

Cubed, the Microsoft Office suite of programs are incredibly easy to learn. Most people I know are self-taught on them anyway; I was.

Or, libraries offer classes on basic computer programs at very modest prices.

CyberCubed
07-14-2016, 11:38 AM
One day I'm going to figure out how to get a job outside of the airport. One day. I've also been thinking of working for the TSA, but I dunno, I don't trust them.

CylonsKlingonsDaleksOhMy
07-14-2016, 12:06 PM
One day I'm going to figure out how to get a job outside of the airport. One day. I've also been thinking of working for the TSA, but I dunno, I don't trust them.

S'all good, we don't trust you either. You'll fit right in.

(Everyone else, be sure to get the word out: Melissa Benois needs to avoid New York airports at all costs!!!)

ProactiveMan
07-15-2016, 03:13 AM
It took me a few months of applying which was time I spent building a better portfolio than the one I graduated with. I got a couple of tip-offs from one of my lecturers, one of which paid off so itís good to network. Interning isnít really the done thing in my part of the world, but I did do a couple of hella-cheap and free projects for some friends and friends of friends so as to have some real-world work in the portfolio.

Donít get discouraged is it doesnít happen quickly.