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View Full Version : What are/were your best and worst subjects in school?


Prowler
09-02-2016, 04:07 PM
I was an average student. Found school boring for the most part and I was lazy as hell. That being said, I've had my good share of good grades.

The only subject I was constantly good at was english. I was always one of the best in the class at it. It always seemed like an easy language to me. I did well at German as well, but not as good. Mostly in the early stages of it.

Then, in the middle territory, there were history, portuguese, french and geography. Depending on what we were covering, I sometimes scored pretty high, other times average or fairly low.

I always did well with 20th century history, ancient Greece, the Age of Discovery, etc. but pre-History, the Roman Empire, Ancient Egypt and Medieval history? Not so much. I recall not doing os impressively at 18th and 19th century history either.

Geography? Locating countries, knowing their flags, their capital cities, etc? Piece of cake! Concepts such as GDP, mortality rates, birth rates, etc? Also easy. When you get more specific about atmosphere, city demographics and such, I start to falter a little more. But nothing too serious.

Portuguese? Just don't make me analyse poems, for f*ck sake. And how would you know that "the curtains were blue" had some deep meaning behind it and it wasn't just, you know, the goddamn curtains being blue?!

French was tricky. Knowing all the verb endings in every tense and remembering how to spell and pronounce words accurately was tough.

Now, worst ones... physics. Math too. I did well at math until 6th grade. 7th to 9th grade? Awful. In high school, I had easier math due to studying humanities, so it was mat applied to social sciences so to speak... you know, stats and alike? I did OK at stats, to be honest.

So, what about you?

TheSkeletonMan939
09-02-2016, 04:17 PM
I don't know about my best subject (I hated school) but I really enjoyed Latin. I've tried really hard to be good at it, but who knows if I am or not.
As for worst - that's easy - I started bombing every math test in 8th grade. I just will never understand how slopes work (in graphs, etc.)

Prowler
09-02-2016, 04:20 PM
I don't know about my best subject (I hated school) but I really enjoyed Latin. I've tried really hard to be good at it, but who knows if I am or not.
As for worst - that's easy - I started bombing every math test in 8th grade. I just will never understand how slopes work (in graphs, etc.)
If only Khan Academy was around when I was a kid. The way math is taught is ATROCIOUS. Honestly, looking at 7th, 8th ande 9th grade math sheet exercises, math really doesn't seem that hard, but ofc, me being a kid at the time my brain was still developing, so it seemed more daunting.

I took Latin for like 3 weeks and then dropped it. I thought it'd be cool but nah.

plastroncafe
09-02-2016, 04:52 PM
I kicked all kinds of ass in the sciences, but struggled with math.
There was something about the way the numbers were presented in science that didn't trip me up the way they did in an actual math class.

It took me far too long to realize it was the speed at which I needed to generate answers that was the problem. It wasn't that I was bad at the subject, but that I'm not fast at it.

Powder
09-02-2016, 05:33 PM
Art/English were my best, math/gym my worst.

Luigiperps
09-02-2016, 05:47 PM
I've always been terrible at Spanish, but I'm pretty good at English.

Utrommaniac
09-02-2016, 07:45 PM
Math has been my eternal enemy. I was always in remedial/special classes (even having a class for it in content mastery in Elementary school). It was even worse in my first semester of college...until I was diagnosed with Discalcula, which allowed me to take a logic class. And even then, I struggled with it.

But I also took AP English classes all through high school as well. I tended to do good there. My Senior year was probably my favorite of those. I wrote a paper on Othello that used the word "uxoricide" ("killing of one's own wife"), and along with an A for the essay, my teacher put a note that she had to look up that word.

ToTheNines
09-03-2016, 05:07 AM
Ugh, I'd give anything to be able to go back and take school seriously. I was naturally good at History, English and most areas of science. But I'd rather be doing anything else than learning back then. I did quit getting referrals and actually acquired straight A's by my senior year, but by then it was far too late for any scholarships.

I think I'm a great example of why America should get off the "everyone goes to college" paradigm and get more vocational early on. I ended up being a redneck, bourbon guzzling construction worker anyways. Woulda saved the local taxpayers and myself a lot of money if I was work force ready right out of high-school, rather than ****ing off for five years in between.

TheSkeletonMan939
09-03-2016, 08:27 AM
I think I'm a great example of why America should get off the "everyone goes to college" paradigm and get more vocational early on. I ended up being a redneck, bourbon guzzling construction worker anyways. Woulda saved the local taxpayers and myself a lot of money if I was work force ready right out of high-school, rather than ****ing off for five years in between.

I completely agree. I really don't understand why kids are so eager to jump from high school to college. If you've got a great idea for what you want to do with your life, and that requires a degree, go for it. But I imagine most kids go/are sent to college because it's "the thing to do".

BubblyShell22
09-03-2016, 10:01 AM
Math has always and will always be my worst subject because of having a learning disability in math. I didn't even find out about it until second grade and was put in LD classes for most of elementary school. My high school LD teacher was worthless and I always hated him. When I got to college, I realized that the problem I had was that I wasn't able to process things as quickly as the other students. Hated statistics and managed to pass it with the help of a tutor. I will never go through that again.

I think the ridiculous thing about college is how many electives you have to take. It should just be the required stuff and one or two electives but it's not like that. I do agree that what they should do after college or even during college is prepare students for the workplace by teaching them how to apply for jobs and writing resumes as well as maybe finding the right job that fits your degree if there is one. Have to admit that my degree is pretty useless and no job really fits me in the outside world so I'd rather do a work at home job anyway.

Wesley
09-03-2016, 10:19 AM
I don't know about my 'best' subjects, but I liked English, Irish and History the most. My worst subjects were Science and PE.

ssjup81
09-03-2016, 11:06 AM
Wouldn't say best, but English and History were ok.

Worst, math and government. Actually, any math higher than Algebra I had serious trouble grasping.

MsMarvelDuckie
09-04-2016, 05:05 PM
I've always been very good in language classes- English was one of my best subjects all through school, and also took three years of Latin- and history, and most areas of science. Math? Not so much. Chemistry was another one I had issues with, mostly due to the math aspect. Geography, psychology and electives were mostly pretty easy for me, too.

ToTheNines
09-05-2016, 11:01 AM
I completely agree. I really don't understand why kids are so eager to jump from high school to college. If you've got a great idea for what you want to do with your life, and that requires a degree, go for it. But I imagine most kids go/are sent to college because it's "the thing to do".

Yeah, and they start beating that into your head in 6th grade. I guess the idea is to make you a wellrounded individual, and it worked on me to an extent, but it royally failed on some of my peers lol.

And even in my case, all the random **** I'm into came about and was cultivated outside of school. Even the "highbrow" stuff.

TheSkeletonMan939
09-05-2016, 12:09 PM
I guess the idea is to make you a wellrounded individual, and it worked on me to an extent, but it royally failed on some of my peers lol.

It also discourages risk, to an extent. Kids are encouraged to take the safe route of 4 more years of college (which is pretty much just high school on hard mode) rather than to seize the day a little. God forbid kids learn to put themselves out there.

BubblyShell22
09-05-2016, 04:48 PM
I think the whole reason why college is a big deal for some people is because it's always been said that if you get a college degree you'll have a better chance of getting a job. The reality is that it depends on the degree you get and where you want to go, not to mention if the jobs are even out there.

MsMarvelDuckie
09-05-2016, 06:10 PM
And there are plenty of jobs where a colkege degree doesn't mean squat. A lot of manual jobs and jobs in service or manufacturing only require you to know how to operate a certain machine or work a cash register or some similar routine work. Jobs like that usually train you for whatever you will be doing, and a college degree is useless because it literally gets wasted.

Cure
09-05-2016, 07:22 PM
Math and English were my best. Like I said in some other thread, thankfully those were the only subjects major exams tested when I was in school.

Spike Spiegel
09-05-2016, 08:27 PM
English/Lit, computer science, and history were my best--I got academic honors in writing after undergrad. I was okay to fairly good at math, depending on the class, but didn't have the patience for it. Physics and chemistry were fascinating on a conceptual level.

One of the nice things about being an adult is choosing what you want to study.