PDA

View Full Version : What is your ethnicity?


Andrew NDB
02-21-2017, 11:19 PM
I'm curious. I am half Colombian, 1/4 Swedish, 1/4 Norwegian.

CyberCubed
02-21-2017, 11:37 PM
I am just a white boy. I was born in America. My parents were born in America. All 4 of my grandparents were born in America. I have no distinguishing features whatsoever of any race.

However if we go back to my great grandparents, they come from Eastern Europe and Russia. My great grandfather was from Spain or Portugal, my other Great grandparents hail from Mother Russia.

But since I, my parents, and all 4 grandparents were born in America, I never considered myself anything other than American. Aside from that, I am also Jewish, but don't tell anyone. Shhhhh. ;)

Wildcat
02-21-2017, 11:45 PM
Hispanic but I don't really look it. Neither does my sister. We have very light skin. Even kids in school never believed I was hispanic. Both parents are though. Born in the US. All family was.

IndigoErth
02-21-2017, 11:58 PM
A mix of various parts of Europe with a dash of Native American for flavor.

I don't know exact amounts, though Scottish (maternal grandmother born a Boyd), Irish, and English probably dominate it. (And other small bits and pieces throw in according to the genealogy DNA tests taken by my mom and dad's brother.)

Far as I know I've got ancestors (the European ones) who have been in the U.S. back as far at least the1600s, maybe late 1500s. We've been around a while.

Candy Kappa
02-22-2017, 02:06 AM
As far as I know, I don't have a whole lot of interesting ethnicity or nationalities in my family, it's more their occupations that are interesting.

My maternal grandpa was Danish, and I have a Scottish ancestors that suddenly had to flee Britain after 5. November 1605.

FredWolfLeonardo
02-22-2017, 04:15 AM
Pakistani/Indian. I was born in Karachi, Pakistan but my fathers side of the family originally came from Hydrabad, India while my mothers side came from the North Eastern mountainious region of Abbotabad in Pakistan.

ToTheNines
02-22-2017, 04:34 AM
One side is Scandinavian and Scotch-Irish, other is German and English. Probably various other boring European countries.

BubblyShell22
02-22-2017, 07:51 AM
I'm white. My great grandmother on my dad's side came from Russia and my mother's side of the family is Dutch.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 12:18 PM
You know this question always bothers me at job interviews, or when co-workers ask you your ethnicity. For some reason whenever I've been at a new job people always ask me, "Well what are you?" and I say, "Well, uh white American."

And then they say, "Well what else?" Like I'm really expected to say some sort of foreign country. I really hate this question, and the sad thing is EVERYONE asks you this. Whenever you're new somewhere this is like the first question everyone asks.

Is, "white American" not a proper response these days? Everytime you say that people stare at you dumbfounded like that's not an acceptable answer.

plastroncafe
02-22-2017, 12:54 PM
You'll find white folks, especially white folks of a particular age, are very sensitive about being white.
Unless they're only recently white, in which case then they'll tell you all about it.
(Yeah, I'm looking at your Italian-American community)

Me? I'm white, with ancestry coming from the UK, Portugal, and Sicily primarily. Though I did just send out one of those Trace Your DNA kits, so there's a chance I'll get a more in depth record of just where my genetics drifted from.

TheSkeletonMan939
02-22-2017, 01:00 PM
White. From my dad's side I've got a lot of German in me. Not entirely sure where my mom's side originates though.
Parts of my ancestry (if that's the correct way to say it) have been in America since the colonial days.

IndigoErth
02-22-2017, 01:17 PM
This is common where you are, Cubed? Or do you look like a mix of something they just can't figure out and are curious? Because at least where I'm at I can't imagine anyone being that intrusive in most cases.

Though as a genealogist I wouldn't really mind. I just wouldn't expect anyone to find it interesting enough to ask. The stories are more interesting then the genetic makeup.

But I love researching the family tree now and then though, love every and any bit I can dig up. I want to know it all and what I'm made of and some of the small traces of things that we didn't know about that showed up in the DNA test were the most interesting. Even if it's just a tiny bit of something that's in there, watered down after many generations... I still find it important. Because if you remove that one grandparent who added that long ago, you'd no longer exist. It all matters the way I see it. And wouldn't want to disrespect anyone in my family by disregarding it.


Though I did just send out one of those Trace Your DNA kits, so there's a chance I'll get a more in depth record of just where my genetics drifted from.
Those things are fun to get back. :)

Ours are through Ancestry.com so it also taps into their growing database and shows you all these other members who are likely your cousins. It hit on a couple second cousins we know so it certainly works. It also proved an old family paternity rumor true, which was awesome.

plastroncafe
02-22-2017, 01:23 PM
Ours are through Ancestry.com so it also taps into their growing database and shows you all these other members who are likely your cousins. It hit on a couple second cousins we know so it certainly works. It also proved an old family paternity rumor true, which was awesome.

That's the test we used too!
I bought enough tests for my immediate family, so we'll see where this goes.

I am SO curious.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 01:24 PM
This is common where you are, Cubed? Or do you look like a mix of something they just can't figure out and are curious? Because at least where I'm at I can't imagine anyone being that intrusive in most cases.

No, that's the thing, I am white with brown hair but with no distinguishing features of any race. That's why I always get asked what I am. I think people ask you more what your race is if you look like, "a regular white guy" because then you can be anything.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 04:02 PM
I expected this to be a CyberCubed thread. Certainly didn't expect it to be an Andrew thread... it's not even a tongue in cheek thread with subtle shots at Fred Wolf TMNT or Michael Bay TMNT.

As for the question itself well afaik I'm 100% Portuguese. I mean everyone from my family up until my great grandparents was Portuguese. What can I say? I'm a Euro man. Unlike people from the Americas we don't tend to have 3 different cultures in our close family.

It seems people from the Americas like getting DNA tests and such. Well I don't care about that stuff. I mean Western Europeans are all genetically close. I'm positive I've had a Spaniard, a Frenchman and/or an English or Irishman in my family tree at some point or another hundreds of years ago, but I don't care about that at all.

You know this question always bothers me at job interviews, or when co-workers ask you your ethnicity. For some reason whenever I've been at a new job people always ask me, "Well what are you?" and I say, "Well, uh white American."

And then they say, "Well what else?" Like I'm really expected to say some sort of foreign country. I really hate this question, and the sad thing is EVERYONE asks you this. Whenever you're new somewhere this is like the first question everyone asks.

Is, "white American" not a proper response these days? Everytime you say that people stare at you dumbfounded like that's not an acceptable answer.
They ask you that, really?

And Cubed, if this means anything to you coming from me, to me you're definitely just an American guy. Hell your whole attitude and way of talking screams "American guy" to me... for better or for worse. :P

I don't think Americans should focus that much on this stuff. FWIW to me Michael Jordan and bill gates are both equally American even though one is black and the other one is white. I'm sure both like similar entertainment and the same sports and thus understand each other's pop culture references.

Culture is more important than race, and I'm sure Hugh Laurie would feel more comfortable talking to Lewis Hamilton than to a random guy from Greece or Finland.

EDIT: CyberCubed and plastron possibly having had ancestors from Portugal thus meaning there's a slim chance they're long lost relatives of mine is a bit scary.

DestronMirage22
02-22-2017, 04:08 PM
100% Salvadoran, baby. :D

snake
02-22-2017, 04:09 PM
White. I have a bit of Italian, but it doesn't show.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 04:09 PM
They ask you that, really?

And Cubed, if this means anything to you coming from me, to me you're definitely just an American guy. Hell your whole attitude and way of talking screams "American guy" to me... for better or for worse. :P
.

Yes, even back in school/College and at any new job I've ever had, in the first few weeks when I'm new I always get asked 3 things:

1. How old am I. I look like I'm in my early 20's, people are shocked when they hear how old I am. For some reason people think I'm fresh out of College or something. It's probably because I'm also rather short.

2. What nationality am I? If I say, "white" they say, "What else?" I say, "American" and they still say, "Where are you from then?"

WTF. Can't anyone just be American these days? It probably doesn't help that most of my co-workers usually *aren't* white, so they're probably curious when they see a white guy in a job what they are.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 04:11 PM
Yes, even back in school/College and at any new job I've ever had, in the first few weeks when I'm new I always get asked 3 things:

1. How old am I. I look like I'm in my early 20's, people are shocked when they hear how old I am. For some reason people think I'm fresh out of College or something. It's probably because I'm also rather short.

2. What nationality am I? If I say, "white" they say, "What else?" I say, "American" and they still say, "Where are you from then?"

WTF. Can't anyone just be American these days? It probably doesn't help that most of my co-workers usually *aren't* white, so they're probably curious when they see a white guy in a job what they are.
last week one of my female classmates was surprised when I told her i was 26. She said she thought I was 21 at best.

I haven't travelled to a foreign country in over a decade but usually people just asked where I was from(in case they did, that is). For some reason this time I went to Tunisia the guy who ran the hotel souvenir store asked me and my family if we were Bulgarian, and then asked us if we were form a former Yugoslavian country.

ToTheNines
02-22-2017, 04:17 PM
People generally think I'm older than 25.

Anyone ever use how-old.net? It always tells me I'm 37-42, but seems pretty damn accurate with everyone else. Hard life, I guess lol.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 04:19 PM
People generally think I'm older than 25.

Anyone ever use how-old.net? It always tells me I'm 37-42, but seems pretty damn accurate with everyone else. Hard life, I guess lol.
The thing is I usually keep facial hair. If I clean shaved I wonder how old I'd look.

Many people aged 50 and above still talk to me in a rather informal manner as if I was a "kid". I get called "young man" often. I mean sure 26 is young but my point is I've not gotten used yet to being called "mister".

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 04:23 PM
A lot of people do look old even when they're young, just look at some famous actors. Look at Hulk Hogan in the 80's, it's like he was born old.

It's also hard to believe Arnold Schwarzennegar was only in his 20's when he filmed Terminator. He looks like he's in his 30's already.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 04:25 PM
A lot of people do look old even when they're young, just look at some famous actors. Look at Hulk Hogan in the 80's, it's like he was born old.

It's also hard to believe Arnold Schwarzennegar was only in his 20's when he filmed Terminator. He looks like he's in his 30's already.
Yeah it depends. Some people just age better than others.

I don't take offence to people assuming I'm 4-5 years younger than my actual age.

Perhaps because I don't smoke, don't do drugs and don't drink heavily my skin stays young.

ToTheNines
02-22-2017, 04:26 PM
The thing is I usually keep facial hair. If I clean shaved I wonder how old I'd look.

Many people aged 50 and above still talk to me in a rather informal manner as if I was a "kid". I get called "young man" often. I mean sure 26 is young but my point is I've not gotten used yet to being called "mister".

Yeah, I could probably pass for 17 if I shaved with a straight razor lol.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 04:32 PM
Anyway, Cubed touched an interesting point. Form what I gather(I might bewrong) most Americans of European ancestry don't feel very connected or at all to their country of origin anymore and just consider themselves American. I notice that Canadians tend to be more likely to identify themselves first as "italian", "Dutch" or "Portuguese" than as simply "Canadian".

Perhaps American society "pressures" more people to assimilate into a standard culture.

Storm Eagle
02-22-2017, 04:45 PM
You'll find white folks, especially white folks of a particular age, are very sensitive about being white.
Unless they're only recently white, in which case then they'll tell you all about it.
(Yeah, I'm looking at your Italian-American community)



Recently white?

last week one of my female classmates was surprised when I told her i was 26. She said she thought I was 21 at best.



People generally think I'm older than 25.



When I was a teenager, people thought I was in my 20s and that used to bug me. I'm 37 now, and two people were surprised when I told them that, and they thought I was in my 20s. At those times though, I was clean shaven. So that might have done it.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 04:48 PM
Anyway, Cubed touched an interesting point. Form what I gather(I might bewrong) most Americans of European ancestry don't feel very connected or at all to their country of origin anymore and just consider themselves American. I notice that Canadians tend to be more likely to identify themselves first as "italian", "Dutch" or "Portuguese" than as simply "Canadian".

Perhaps American society "pressures" more people to assimilate into a standard culture.

That's because if you have grandparents born in a country too, you're so far removed from what your ancestors are that it doesn't matter.

I mean every American's ancestors comes from either Europe/Asia or South America, but if you go back three generations and you're all still Americans, it doesn't feel that way for you. I know my great grandparents come from Russia and Europe, but do I consider myself Russian? Nope.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 04:50 PM
That's because if you have grandparents born in a country too, you're so far removed from what your ancestors are that it doesn't matter.

I mean every American's ancestors comes from either Europe/Asia or South America, but if you go back three generations and you're all still Americans, it doesn't feel that way for you. I know my great grandparents come from Russia and Europe, but do I consider myself Russian? Nope.
That happens because USA is a nation made by immigrants. In a European country 2nd and 3rd generation immigrants arem ore likely to still feel some affinity to their family's homeland.

plastroncafe
02-22-2017, 04:52 PM
Recently white?


On Columbus Day, let’s remember that Italians weren’t always white in America (http://fusion.net/story/213123/on-columbus-day-lets-remember-that-italians-werent-always-white-in-america/) (fusion.net)

That happens because USA is a nation made by immigrants. In a European country 2nd and 3rd generation immigrants arem ore likely to still feel some affinity to their family's homeland.

In the States that kind of language is used to reinforce the idea that people who immigrate here aren't really "from" here and that the US isn't their home, even after they become citizens. And it's also a way to de-legitimize their children, who may have been born here.

IndigoErth
02-22-2017, 04:52 PM
Well, we are also a country/culture that is very pro-individual and, for some, a drive to be unique. Now, it has gotten annoying in the form of all these special snowflake kids, but in terms of heritage and knowing where you're from and what and who got you here over generations, personally I find that interesting to know.

I've got people who fought battles alongside and had close relation to big names in Scottish history; people who were brave enough to get on those boats, endure that for months, and start a new life in the U.S.; people who endured white invasion of these lands; people who settled in the east and after generations have never really gone very far from here (mostly dad's side), while others (mostly mom's side) who have moved back and forth from the east to the Midwest and back.

I suppose those that chose to uproot and come to the U.S. must have possessed a bit of an adventurous spirit and maybe a remaining part of that for some feeds an interest in knowing their family's past. Could have been those generations themselves who passed down a sense of pride in it. Sure, we're all Americans, but I like knowing how I got here and what happened in the lives before me that led up to mine.


Edit: Although in my genealogy research I think the the funniest tidbit I have found was either a record or clipping for a grandfather (of however many 'greats') who got arrested.... for working on Sunday. Working on/with his mill in his barn. These were country people, it's not like the nearest neighbor was 20' away. Seriously, who told on him? I want to know how that went down. :lol:


A lot of people do look old even when they're young, just look at some famous actors.
Or those that magically don't age. Though I don't envy people like DiCaprio. He kind of went from looking flipping 20 for two decades...then suddenly looked 40. :tlol:

Prowler
02-22-2017, 04:56 PM
having mixed heritage must lead to some conflicting thoughts and identity crisis, though. If your family tree up to your great great parents comes from 3 different countries must be hard to pick the one you identify with the most. Just like many 2nd and 3rd generation immigrants in European countries struggle at assimilation.

How does an American of Japanese origin feel when he goes to Japan and he looks like people there... but doesn't speak Japanese at all and is seen by people there as just another "gaijin"?

plastroncafe
02-22-2017, 05:00 PM
America is very Pro-individual, so long as you do everything like everyone else does. Or to put it more succinctly: Just do it the American way, and no one will get hurt.

Storm Eagle
02-22-2017, 05:01 PM
On Columbus Day, let’s remember that Italians weren’t always white in America (http://fusion.net/story/213123/on-columbus-day-lets-remember-that-italians-werent-always-white-in-america/) (fusion.net)


Ah, interesting.

That reminds me. I have a co-worker who's of Italian origin. A black guy at my job dissed white people, and when the co-worker reacted, he said "yeah, but you're Italian". Regardless of what that article says, I still think that was screwed up of him to say.

The article also reminds me of how a friend says that the human race is the only race out there.

Too bad you most likely can't say that in the south and live to tell about it.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 05:05 PM
So Italian, Irish and German people weren't considered White in USA at some point? That seems so silly. Did Americans of English ancestry think England was the birthpalce of the White race or something and that the rest of Europe wasn't White but something "inbetween" England and the other races? Not even Nordicists would be that extreme nor was Adolf Hitler whom I assume took racial matters very seriously.

What's considered the birthplace of European culture is Greece, having European culture a Greco-Roman/Latin background. And if you wanna go down the genetic route, the Iberian Peninsula has some of the oldest ones in Europe and yet we don't claim to be more European than people from other European countries.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 05:11 PM
Most of the original white people in the U.S. were from Britain, obviously, so anyone not British was not considered white in the 1700-1800's. Irish people were also discriminated against harshly in the U.S. for years similar to blacks and Asians.

plastroncafe
02-22-2017, 05:12 PM
It seems silly because it is silly, and yet those same tropes live on.
Race (human categorization) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_(human_categorization))

According to Smedley and Marks the European concept of "race", along with many of the ideas now associated with the term, arose at the time of the scientific revolution, which introduced and privileged the study of natural kinds, and the age of European imperialism and colonization which established political relations between Europeans and peoples with distinct cultural and political traditions.[41][42] As Europeans encountered people from different parts of the world, they speculated about the physical, social, and cultural differences among various human groups.

Prowler
02-22-2017, 05:17 PM
Most of the original white people in the U.S. were from Britain, obviously, so anyone not British was not considered white in the 1700-1800's. Irish people were also discriminated against harshly in the U.S. for years similar to blacks and Asians.
I wonder if in Portuguese, Dutch, Spanish and French colonised countries in the Americas something similar happened. Afaik, the Portuguese community in Brazil was a bit "closed off" and even though obviously tons of Brazilians have Portuguese last names, I believe many White Brazilians have no relation to Portugal whatsoever and are of Italian or German ancestry instead.

And aren't there nowadays more Americans of German and Irish ancestry than of English ancestry? Many Americans are of Italian ancestry as well.

Did people already talk about "races" in the 18th century, though? Because referring to people as "white", "black", "brown", etc. is a fairly recent phenomenon as far as History goes since science wasn't advanced enough to perform genetic tests in the 15th century, per example.

It seems silly because it is silly, and yet those same tropes live on.
Race (human categorization) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_(human_categorization))
Well, I think it's safe to say that most European people view each others as "white/european folk".

...although now that I think about it, I guess if I asked people if they consider Turks and Armenians as "White/European" I guess many would say "no".

I mean, technically there's lots of "white" people in Northern Africa and in the Levante region. Amazighers/berbers many could pass as Europeans, unlike Arabs from the gulf(Saudis, Iraqis, etc.) which obviously look more different.

...yeah best not to overthink this kind of stuff :lol:

Katie
02-22-2017, 05:43 PM
My dad was 1/2 Creek an 1/2 Scots Irish. I'm also fairly certian one of my great great grandmothers on his side was at least part black if not 100%. Not uncommon in that Tribe to adopt runaway slaves.

My mom is white white white. Her family is decended from William Bradford and a lot of them went to Canada during the Revolutionary War. They didn't show back up in the US until after the Civil War. Then the migrated from Chicago to Washington State.

An uncle on her side was the one who sent the Donner party out. He had dreams of populating California and becoming its king....or president.

In case you didn't figure it out, I LOVE tracing my family history.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 05:55 PM
Just curious, is it really that interesting tracing back your families heritage? As I said, I know my great grandparents were born in Russia, some others around Spain/Portugal, but I know if you research further back than that it could be all over the place.

I mean you don't know your great grandparents. So if I find out mine were Russian farmers or bankers or worked in the steel mill, what does that do for me?

Prowler
02-22-2017, 06:02 PM
Just curious, is it really that interesting tracing back your families heritage? As I said, I know my great grandparents were born in Russia, some others around Spain/Portugal, but I know if you research further back than that it could be all over the place.

I mean you don't know your great grandparents. So if I find out mine were Russian farmers or bankers or worked in the steel mill, what does that do for me?
I don't care about it either but I guess some people are just curious.

But yes, let's say I had ancestors from France or Ireland about 300 years ago. It'd mean nothing to me since I don't have any Irish or French last name nor was the culture I was raised in resembling of those countries.

The thing is, 300 years ago people wouldn't answer with their own nationality when asked "what are you." They'd answer with "I'm Catholic/Protestant/Orthodox/Muslim/Jewish/etc." It was nationalism that started giving people a proper national and ethic identity. Germany and Italy became united countries in the 19th century only thanks to that sentiment "If we speak the same language and the same culture then we should form a single country!"

And you mentioned people ask you often what your ethnicity is and don't just settle for "white american" as an answer. It's funny. The world is more globalised than ever and yet we're still very divided and very protective of our own identities/cultures.

I guess world peace will never be achieved.

IndigoErth
02-22-2017, 06:21 PM
Why does it need to do anything? No one has to be interested their family history, but some people are.

All it "does" for me is fulfill a fascination with family history, a hobby and challenge to work on, and something I can pass down and keep that knowledge going of who we are as a family. Genealogy is a puzzle and some people enjoy the hunt for clues and trying to find unknowns. I finally last year after SO MANY years found a little more info for one of my tough dead ends and got one step further. That it took so long was worth that feeling of finally finding that breakthrough I was so sure was there somewhere.

There were also a few names I found and added to the tree last year of kids who died as infants. :ohwell: Rather sad to see and find out one of my sets of great grandparents dealt with losing an 11 month old baby, but I like being able to add these kids names to keep them in some way from being entirely forgotten.

I suppose those of us who do care about this stuff are probably likewise people who don't want to be forgotten either.

AT-Man
02-22-2017, 06:31 PM
I'm white.

Jester
02-22-2017, 07:17 PM
Surname's Scots-Irish, but I'm an American Mutt...so who knows what might be in there a few generations back. Debated taking one of those 23&Me tests to map it out...if it weren't for the money.

TheSkeletonMan939
02-22-2017, 07:40 PM
I mean you don't know your great grandparents. So if I find out mine were Russian farmers or bankers or worked in the steel mill, what does that do for me?

It doesn't do anything for you, but isn't it nice to keep them alive in a way by acknowledging and being aware of their lives?

(Incidentally I actually met both of my great-grandparents on my dad's side multiple times; they lived for a long time!)

plastroncafe
02-22-2017, 07:49 PM
Some people are fascinated by history, and some aren't.
I fall into the latter category. I think it's fascinating to look back and see what we can glean from the past.

Especially since so much of that past can have strong influences on our present.

But as a point of order, Ethnicity isn't the same thing as Nationality.
Ethnicity is about culture, Nationality is just country you live in.

I could easily say I'm Yankee New Englander as well as what...part third-generation Sicilian American.
Which means I pronounce Italian words differently than someone from New York or New Jersey, who'll in turn pronounce them differently than someone from Sicily today.

Why? Because my ancestors came over before Italian was standardized, so those regional accents hadn't been merged yet.
How Capicola Became Gabagool: The Italian New Jersey Accent, Explained (http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-capicola-became-gabagool-the-italian-new-jersey-accent-explained) (atlasobscura)

Katie
02-22-2017, 07:56 PM
I do like history and I have enjoyed learning some of the neat stories. I have an ancestor who was arrested for helping people communicate between the colonies and Swiss relatives. Some wierd law.

Just neat stuff. I like knowing the people that made me who I am today.

ProactiveMan
02-22-2017, 08:15 PM
I'm Australian. All of my grandparents were born here, and some of their parents and grandparents were too. I'm genetically European, and mostly Anglo Celt I guess, but one of my grandparents is ethnically Slav.

I have very dark hair and I can tan, but my skin is quite pale by default.

I couldn't even begin to explain Australian culture; it isn't very well defined, so I don't really understand what it's like to identify with one's ethnicity. The closest reference point to me personally would be Catholicism I suppose, even though I don't practice, and don't agree with a lot of it, it still feels like it's part of me.

Jester
02-22-2017, 08:34 PM
Some people are fascinated by history, and some aren't.
I (or rather my wife) found a book about a group of vigilantes from the Branson, Mo area....one of whom was my Great x3 Grandfather. He's quoted in the book...though to be fair the quotes are gleaned from an interview he did for the Branson Historical Society, which I read BEFORE we found the book.

My wife was able to trace her linage back to Robert the Bruce.

DarkFell
02-22-2017, 08:51 PM
I'm mostly an American mutt with some European, Native American, and a little side of Hispanic.

A lot of California and Minnesota customers that I talk to over the phone, are usually convinced that I'm a Southerner. Funny thing is I (IMO) have a light Southern accent, compared to a majority of the Southern folks that I also talk to.

IndigoErth
02-22-2017, 08:55 PM
Pretty awesome about that book, Jester.

I've got people who fought battles alongside and had close relation to big names in Scottish history
My wife was able to trace her linage back to Robert the Bruce.
And there's one of them now. And I believe the man by which the Boyds were rewarded some of their lands and estates for their loyalty, etc.

My grandmother was always very proud of that heritage, having been born a Boyd herself. Still trying to trace her exact line though.

Kicking myself for mostly missing out on the free UK records Ancestry was allowing this past Fri. though Monday night. Just wasn't ready to dive into it with any direction and spend enough time on it to get much out of it. :ohwell: Hope they offer it again.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 09:02 PM
I bet some of our great grandpappies were slave owners or mass murderers or sired 15 children among multiple women. Seriously, knowing how people lived prior to the 1900's is not a good thing.

Everytime I think about people born prior to say...1920 or so, I think about what sad miserable lives they must have had. Not because of the lack of technology, but because of how ignorant the world was, how there were wars every year, diseases that killed people young, crime and mass murder, women and minorities had no say and were treated like slaves or dirt, etc.

Thank god we were born in the right time period, as well as our parents to a lesser extent. Some of our grandparents even didn't live such good lives, I know both of my grandparents were in World War II, who knows how many people they killed.

Jester
02-22-2017, 09:16 PM
True...ish...

I know that same vigilante grandfather fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War...but was captured and was a POW for most of the war.

Utrommaniac
02-22-2017, 09:31 PM
I'm white.

Most recent ancestry that I know of came from Germany/France in the 1700's and settled in Ohio, which was on my paternal grandfather's side. The earliest I know of was a little girl who was targeted in the midst of the Salem and survived. This was my maternal grandmother. It's pretty neat. There was a poem written about her, but my cousin has all the information about that. I think her name was Providence?

There was a little bit of marrying Indigenous Americans (my great-great-great-grandfather was 1/4 Cherokee). I would only be slightly surprised if I have a Black grandmother somewhere down the line. It's unlikely, but given how I had family living through the Salem Witch Trials, it probably happened at some point. I'm told somewhere there's a grandfather who was a slave trader, which would go back SUPER far.

I'm also descended from John Quincy Adams on my maternal great-grandmother's side. Which is pretty cool.

So it's extremely strong German/French on my father's side (we're REALLY sure it was German), and a hodge-podge on my mother's. Welsh is what I recall the most.

Machias Banshee
02-22-2017, 09:40 PM
Our family is a delightful mess of several things.

I've got French, German (mom said her family goes back to the Huguenots), Portuguese...

Have a relative who was an officer under Napoleon, wrote The Three Musketeers, The Man in the Iron Mask... and his mother was Haitian.

Coola Yagami
02-22-2017, 09:59 PM
I'm Mexican mixed with Dominican. All American though. People usually just think I'm 100% Mexican especially since the Dominican Republic isn't exactly all that popular.

CyberCubed
02-22-2017, 10:05 PM
Also whoever said being white gives you a better chance at getting a new job than minorities....they lied.

Utrommaniac
02-22-2017, 10:25 PM
Have a relative who was an officer under Napoleon, wrote The Three Musketeers, The Man in the Iron Mask... and his mother was Haitian.

Woaaaaah that's awesome :D ! What sort of relative to Alexandre Dumas? Cousin? Grandfather? Uncle?

I knew someone who said he was a nephew to one of the Three Stooges.

Redeemer
02-22-2017, 10:46 PM
Now i know who to be racist against :D

joking, joking

:lol:

ssjup81
02-22-2017, 10:48 PM
Also whoever said being white gives you a better chance at getting a new job than minorities....they lied.Tell that to minorities looked over for jobs and promotions.

Candy Kappa
02-23-2017, 03:32 AM
I bet some of our great grandpappies were slave owners or mass murderers or sired 15 children among multiple women. Seriously, knowing how people lived prior to the 1900's is not a good thing.

Interestingly, my dad do family research and he found out that we are related to one of the biggest slaver traders during the time Denmark-Norway joined the transatlantic slave trade. She took over after her husband died (iirc) and became one of the riches persons in Norwegian history, but her son or grandson who inherited the fortune drank and gambled it all away.

Prowler
02-23-2017, 05:48 AM
I bet some of our great grandpappies were slave owners or mass murderers or sired 15 children among multiple women. Seriously, knowing how people lived prior to the 1900's is not a good thing.

Everytime I think about people born prior to say...1920 or so, I think about what sad miserable lives they must have had. Not because of the lack of technology, but because of how ignorant the world was, how there were wars every year, diseases that killed people young, crime and mass murder, women and minorities had no say and were treated like slaves or dirt, etc.

Thank god we were born in the right time period, as well as our parents to a lesser extent. Some of our grandparents even didn't live such good lives, I know both of my grandparents were in World War II, who knows how many people they killed.
Most people didn't own slaves. You had to be really wealthy and own lots of land and property to be able to house and feed slaves on a daily basis.

Katie
02-23-2017, 06:06 AM
^^ yup.

The actual slave owners were the 1% of their time. Most people were poor sharecroppers who were probably treated only slightly better than the slaves.

One of my cousins says Robert the Bruce is in our family line too, but I have not found it. She is a cousin through my mother's half brother, so it may be in her family but not mine. I'm still digging on that one.

Prowler
02-23-2017, 06:14 AM
And in European countries I'm sure most people didn't even know how to read or know what was beyond their region/area. Not to mention all those dirt poor farmers and factory workers who could barely feed themselves, let alone afford slaves. Plus, most slavery after sometime was banned in the European continent and just kept being legal in the oversea colonial territories.

I guess the closest to modern day slavery in the developed world are unpaid internships. Those are quite sh*tty.

As for the rest of the world, well many people in poor countries work at outsourced factories and are exploited. They might as well be slaves. I guess one should feel dirty for buying new pair of Nike shoes, eh?

And there's still slavery in several parts of Africa and Asia. It's really sad.

Katie
02-23-2017, 06:34 AM
Also, on thinking they had miserable lives, they didn't. You can't look on it with a modern life and say "oh they had sucky lives because of disease and war and whatever else". They didn't know any better. That was just the time they lived in.

Probably a hundred, two hundred years from now, kids that read about our time period will think we're pretty backwards and naive. Yet I'm happy and content with my life. I have no idea what I might be missing that people hundreds of years from now will take for granted.

CyberCubed
02-23-2017, 12:31 PM
Also, on thinking they had miserable lives, they didn't. You can't look on it with a modern life and say "oh they had sucky lives because of disease and war and whatever else". They didn't know any better. That was just the time they lived in.

You were far more likely to die of war or disease back then than any later time. I'm sure crime, murder, rape, etc. was also far more rampant back then and harder to catch. Who knows all the undocumented murders and killings back then.

Entire villages were pillaged and set on fire. There were witch hunts with people burned at the stake. People died at sea during ship battles. People died of malaria, the flu and other diseases. People were beaten to death or worked in horrible working conditions, slavery, etc.

I mean do people remember history? Every year there was another war between countries. I sure as hell would never have wanted to live in the 1400's-1800's or anytime before that. Even the early 1900's had a lot of our grandparents involved in World War 1 and 2, and they were the lucky ones to survive not counting the millions killed.

Life was horrible back then. If you made it to 50 that was considered "old" back then like 70 is now.

plastroncafe
02-23-2017, 12:31 PM
Someone doesn't watch the news.

CyberCubed
02-23-2017, 12:36 PM
Wars of today are not a fraction of what they once were prior to 1950.

Prowler
02-23-2017, 02:39 PM
Wars of today are not a fraction of what they once were prior to 1950.
That's debatable. It's not like technology was advanced enough to produce chemical weapons hundreds of years ago.

If a large scale war blew up again it'd basically be the end of the world.

plastroncafe
02-23-2017, 02:40 PM
It'd only be debatable if he came to the conversation with proof to back up his claims. Which we all know Cyber won't.

MsMarvelDuckie
02-23-2017, 02:55 PM
Yeah I'm with Plastron on this one. We still have wars (Middle East anyone?) and disease (resurgeance of mumps polio and others once thought wiped out), poverty (technically anyone who lives on minimum wage qualifies as in poverty), murders (which are often more gristley, or mass shootings), rapes(especially on college campuses- and so many rapes are unreported it just LOOKS like it happens less) and racism running rampant all over. We only THINK things are "so mch better" now when problems do not directly tough our own lives, but they are there.

Ethnicity.... Mine is sort of a hodge-podge of primarily Irish with German/French (grandmother's side), claims of Cherokee or Comanche from (unknown) biological father (the claims came from my uncle who SAYS he knows who my dad was and WHY my mom has always hedged on his identity), and that same uncle did a family geneology years ago that rooted out some "Black Dutch" ancestors- which I have learned means I have German/Native American GYPSY ancestors! Our Irish roots have been in the States since 1848 or so, and were traced to three brothers who came over during the Famine and spread out from New York to the midwest. We also supposedly have ties to the historical Boones and former President Reagan. And somewhere there is supposed to be a family castle from the days when my family's ancestors were landed nobility in Ulster vicinity, and there is supposed to be a clause in the deed that any member of the clan who can prove blood ancestry could claim it- after paying the back taxes and repairs of course, lol!

CyberCubed
02-23-2017, 03:29 PM
It'd only be debatable if he came to the conversation with proof to back up his claims. Which we all know Cyber won't.

You can look up the death tolls of all the major wars prior to say 1950 or so or the end of World War II. No wars of today have as huge deaths tolls as that.

MsMarvelDuckie
02-23-2017, 03:36 PM
You're probably looking at "military personnel" deaths, rather than total deaths. These days most of the death toll comes from civilians killed by IED's, bombings, and other WMD's. Those are far greater than the toll on the ones doing the actual fighting.

plastroncafe
02-23-2017, 03:44 PM
Telling someone else to do the research is not providing support for your claim, Cyber.

CyberCubed
02-23-2017, 03:53 PM
Telling someone else to do the research is not providing support for your claim, Cyber.

Take a quick look:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars_by_death_toll

FredWolfLeonardo
02-23-2017, 07:42 PM
It also depends on the cultural views of the people in terms of their quality of life, what exactly makes life better or worth living? The answers may surprise you when you look at other cultures.

For example, many Buddhists do not share the typical view that more longetivity, pleasure and comfort equal to a better life. Rather, their primary purpose is to obtain peace of mind (nirvana) and the material world is seen as an illusion that can easily distract one from the true path. Thus, many gave up a comfortable life and hold no attachment to it. I wouldn't be surprised if many Buddhist living in Brutal conditions were happier than the average Westerner living a pampered life.

MsMarvelDuckie
02-23-2017, 07:58 PM
Happiness and a "good life" are subjective not just on a cultural level but a personal one as well. Each person defines what constitutes a good life based not only on his culture and ethnical influences but on his personal experiences and knowledge as well. For instance, many cultures focus on happiness in "the next life" over one's present condition. Yet many people consider personal wealth or accomplishment a measure of what makes them "happy".

IndigoErth
02-23-2017, 09:00 PM
What's quality of life in prior generations have to do with interest in family history and genetic heritage anyhow...

I swear, people either think people long ago lived in a terrible world or a magical one. They weren't really all that different than us. They wouldn't miss what they didn't have, no more than we'd miss how life might be in 2117, and ailments with no cures were a fact of life. Advances in healthcare might help, but really we still live that way. Will people of the future think we lived in a horrible time with miserable lives because there was no cure for cancer, AIDS, and other diseases and war was still frequent? I mean, my dad died of a terminal illness most have never even heard of (to the point it took forever to even diagnose him until a month before he died), but I don't feel like it's the year 1800 because of it...

Anyhow...


If we're naming names, Patrick Henry is said to be in our family tree somewhere.

CyberCubed
02-24-2017, 02:22 AM
The funny thing is unlike our ancestors thinking about the future, we all pretty much know what the future will be like. Most sci-fi movies, shows, comics, etc. take place in the future. In fact many of the things back in 80's and 90's movies that was considered "the future" we have today, like pocket phones, flat TV's, VR, video phone messaging when you see someones face, etc.

The only thing we didn't come up with is flying cars because it would be too dangerous in real life. If people are already crashing up the roads and can't drive straight as it is, I can't imagine flying cars with people crashing into buildings and nonsense like that.

IndigoErth
02-24-2017, 09:02 AM
Sure... Maybe things the same generation can think up in fiction and later invent. I have a hard time thinking of such a short span of time as 'the future.' But there's probably plenty we can't even fathom that may exist in a couple hundred years.

Don't be silly... flying cars will prob pilot themselves. :twink: Considering they're starting to come out with earthbound cars that can do so. (On one hand I'm not sure I could ever trust a self-driving car, but on the other I look forward to the extra nap during the commute. Obviously a wake-up alarm when it pulls into the parking lot must be among its features.)

edit: Although small personal flying cars already exist. They're called airplanes, like the Cessna. (Though those tend to crash on their own without the pilot driver causing it.)




Curious about the so far lack of any Middle Eastern TMNT fans...

DisKosh
02-24-2017, 11:27 AM
White, British.

Family history? My great grandfather was in the IRA.

MsMarvelDuckie
02-24-2017, 10:19 PM
Flying cars, you say? How about this?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VRZNLBL7Px4

See Cubed-we already have those. And this was just one of the first links I found on Googling it. They have been a thing for YEARS now.

Point is, we are not the "first" generation(or even era) to imagine or create such things. There was once this guy named Leonardo, who invented such amazing things as tanks, submarines, helicopters, and many others- about 500 years ago. And a guy named Jules imagined travel to the moon, about a 100 years before it happened. So many of our "modern" inventions have been thought of or invented.a LOT longer than we tent to think. What will the future be like? It will be what our descendants make of it!

ProactiveMan
02-25-2017, 09:51 AM
You're probably looking at "military personnel" deaths, rather than total deaths. These days most of the death toll comes from civilians killed by IED's, bombings, and other WMD's. Those are far greater than the toll on the ones doing the actual fighting.

That was the same in WWII - more civilians died than military personnel, almost double if you including things like famine and disease caused by the war; aprox 50 million. A lot of people died in that war - it's almost hard to comprehend.

I think in general, people are better off now than 100 years ago. We still face a lot of the same problems and we probably always will, but unless we forget everything we've learned up until now, we're potentially better off than our ancestors. Hell, 100 years ago, people were still struggling with the concept that you shouldn't crap in your drinking water.

saintsaucey
02-25-2017, 09:58 AM
Kandorian American

CyberCubed
02-27-2017, 03:59 AM
I seem to recall in one of the last census surveys they discovered there are probably going to be more hispanics than whites living in the U.S. soon. Not surprising if true.

Although they should say there's going to be more mixed races in the future. Lots of people now have white fathers with hispanic mothers, or vice versa. Same for white/black couples or white/asian couples.

Lots of white guys now go for black/hispanic/asian, etc. girls rather than other white girls. So we're having a lot more mixed race children nowadays than ever before.

Andrew NDB
02-27-2017, 10:56 AM
Lots of white guys now go for black/hispanic/asian, etc. girls rather than other white girls.

Yeah, I haven't dated a white girl in a decade.

IndigoErth
02-27-2017, 11:40 AM
I seem to recall in one of the last census surveys they discovered there are probably going to be more hispanics than whites living in the U.S. soon.
So they say. Although the census is only a inventory of present populations. Maybe it can note present trends, but it's still hardly a prophet.


Although come to think of it...
Maybe that claim is one reason why The Orange One and his pale faced minions are obsessed with walls.
Melting pot country though. *shrug* But genetics do what they want to do; long from now humanity will still come in different shades and if those in the future (far future) who get labeled as "white" are a slightly tanner version of white, so be it.

Just try to preserve the diversity of eye color, that's all I ask. :trazz:

Prowler
02-27-2017, 11:46 AM
Most people end up marrying "one of their own", though. A lot of things can change. Who knows if Mexico's economy won't be in a better state in about 20 years and they stop migrating en masse to USA.

There's also fears that in some European countries like France, the Uk and Sweden foreigners mainly from Africa and Asia might out number the native populations in some years, but nothing says that in 30-40 years people from African and Asian countries will continue to immigrate ne masse to the European continent or that the fertility rates of those countries continue to be massive.

There's always been migrations and yet we still have white folk, black folk, east asian folk, etc.

CyberCubed
02-27-2017, 12:38 PM
Also due to the rise of anime in U.S., a lot of white guys now purposely go for Chinese or Japanese girlfriends. It's pretty funny and there's some articles online about it, white men look for "Asian waifu's" because they are anime fans.

I don't know if I would go for an Asian girl myself, but many of them are beautiful.

Prowler
02-27-2017, 12:47 PM
Also due to the rise of anime in U.S., a lot of white guys now purposely go for Chinese or Japanese girlfriends. It's pretty funny and there's some articles online about it, white men look for "Asian waifu's" because they are anime fans.

I don't know if I would go for an Asian girl myself, but many of them are beautiful.
Classic CyberCubed :lol:

plastroncafe
02-27-2017, 12:52 PM
Racist AF?

ToTheNines
02-27-2017, 12:53 PM
Racist AF?

I mean... look who said it.

CyberCubed
02-27-2017, 12:54 PM
No, it's not. I certainly don't mean any ill over it. Besides you can look this up, also a lot of Asian women look for white men:

http://www.asiandatenet.com/asian-dating/why-asian-girls-looking-for-white-men/

Prowler
02-27-2017, 01:29 PM
..how do you even know a website like that.

IndigoErth
02-27-2017, 01:34 PM
Oh. Hm. Well then.

Well you've certainly steered this thread, that started out asking a simple question, through the off-road 'scenic route.'

Prowler
02-27-2017, 01:35 PM
Oh. Hm. Well then.

Well you've certainly steered this thread, that started out asking a simple question, through the 'scenic route.'
And you're surprised? I actually assumed at first that this thread had been made by CC.

That being said, gotta love CyberCubed :lol:

DestronMirage22
02-27-2017, 02:04 PM
Also due to the rise of anime in U.S., a lot of white guys now purposely go for Chinese or Japanese girlfriends. It's pretty funny and there's some articles online about it, white men look for "Asian waifu's" because they are anime fans.

I don't know if I would go for an Asian girl myself, but many of them are beautiful.

http://cdn.slowrobot.com/62920142008105.jpg

ssjup81
02-27-2017, 02:21 PM
Also due to the rise of anime in U.S., a lot of white guys now purposely go for Chinese or Japanese girlfriends. It's pretty funny and there's some articles online about it, white men look for "Asian waifu's" because they are anime fans.

I don't know if I would go for an Asian girl myself, but many of them are beautiful.No, this was the case LONG before the anime crazy. The guys, who actually did go to Asian countries for that purpose, were interested in Asian women due to stereotypes.

IndigoErth
02-27-2017, 03:23 PM
I think I'd be a bit insulted if someone's interest in me stemmed from cartoons. :ohwell:

Yeah, have heard that there are stereotypes... Ugh. A longtime friend of mine (Filipino woman into white guys) seems to have come across a little of that in a guy or two she's tried to dated.

Didn't last long (thank goodness), just too independent and Americanized for their taste. One of them, a customer she had a crush on and only got together with once or twice, supposedly was going on some trip with a couple buddies to the Philippians. And honestly, while I never said so to her, I was questioning their intentions of the trip... Maybe it was entirely innocent, but I dunno.

And you're surprised?
Nope... not at all. lol

Prowler
02-27-2017, 03:31 PM
I think I'd be a bit insulted if someone's interest in me stemmed from cartoons. :ohwell:

Yeah, have heard that there are stereotypes... Ugh. A longtime friend of mine (Filipino woman into white guys) seems to have come across a little of that in a guy or two she's tried to dated.

Didn't last long (thank goodness), just too independent and Americanized for their taste. One of them, a customer she had a crush on and only got together with once or twice, supposedly was going on some trip with a couple buddies to the Philippians. And honestly, while I never said so to her, I was questioning their intentions of the trip... Maybe it was entirely innocent, but I dunno.


Nope... not at all. lol
Not entirely related but I remember reading/hearing some discrimination experiences on the news some years ago of Brazilian women getting hit on here and then after they declined the advances the guy would say "but you're a Brazilian woman. Aren't you supposed to be sexy and easy?"

In certain countries/regions men of certain ethnic groups are stereotyped as being thieves whilst women are stereotyped as being "easy" or "prostitutes/sluts". I think that's even worse.

Vicky82
02-27-2017, 03:42 PM
British White.

Papenbrook
02-27-2017, 05:55 PM
I am an African American. However, I don't know what/which section(s) of Africa that my ancestors originated from.

ssjup81
02-27-2017, 07:39 PM
I am an African American. However, I don't know what/which section(s) of Africa that my ancestors originated from.Same here unfortunately.

Lethal Lullaby
03-01-2017, 05:41 AM
1/4 Korean at least, but basically white, the rest of me is.

Stephen
03-17-2017, 03:10 PM
White/British

MsMarvelDuckie
03-17-2017, 07:21 PM
For today, at least- 100% Irish, me lads and lassies!

The rest of the year it's maybe 45-50% But still.....

IndigoErth
03-17-2017, 09:21 PM
I wish the genealogy DNA test we did didn't lump Scottish and Irish together, but I realize they are genetically very much alike so it's hard to tell, plus the migration of some families from Scotland to Ireland for a while before some generations moved onto the U.S. The Scottish part of my family was always obvious, with the maternal grandmother being a Boyd and all, though we're no doubt Irish as well, at least on my dad's side, and wouldn't mind knowing the percentage.



I feel like the allusive Middle Eastern member is like an ultra rare NPC we can't find. We'll never win that first, lowest rank of the Diversity Achievement at this rate... :trazz:

Prowler
03-17-2017, 10:07 PM
I wish the genealogy DNA test we did didn't lump Scottish and Irish together, but I realize they are genetically very much alike so it's hard to tell, plus the migration of some families from Scotland to Ireland for a while before some generations moved onto the U.S. The Scottish part of my family was always obvious, with the maternal grandmother being a Boyd and all, though we're no doubt Irish as well, at least on my dad's side, and wouldn't mind knowing the percentage.



I feel like the allusive Middle Eastern member is like an ultra rare NPC we can't find. We'll never win that first, lowest rank of the Diversity Achievement at this rate... :trazz:
Those tests seem like BS. How can they prove you're 50% this and 25% that? Especially considering how much political borders have changed throughout history? And how can someone be 0% Asian or African when people from those continents also belong to the same species as Europeans and Amerindians do? How far in one's family tree does such a test even go?

Cure
03-17-2017, 10:51 PM
They prove it with ****ing DNA. Are you seriously one of those people who doubts legitimate science?

IndigoErth
03-17-2017, 10:59 PM
Not sure how far back it can go. If humanity came out of Africa, then no, it doesn't go nearly back that far obliviously. After a while some things will be watered down enough that heritage far enough away may no longer show up simply because there is so little left and, in the DNA lottery, an individual did not inherit genes from it even though it still exists back in the family history somewhere.

These tests are not based on exact linage. It's more like taking a handful of playing cards, drawing a circle on the floor, throwing the cards into the air and seeing which ones land in the circle. Those being the genetics someone inherits. Do it again for a sibling and it may be similar, but a little different.

The tests done from my mom and uncle give me a rough idea, and the things that came out high for them are likely probably still a good amount in me too, but I can't tell exact lineage percentage from them since it's their own genetic makeup.

I can say it does work though, at least the ones we did through Ancestry.com. Because that site has their results combined with their database, it compares yours with other members who have done it and it matches up people who have similar results and are likely your cousins, with a probability given.

I have a couple second cousins that, unknown to us, had already also done this test and are members of the site, and it put them right up top.

There is also the old family rumor on my mom's side, of an old family friend my grandfather and his brother called "Uncle Bill." Thing is... it was always rumored and suspected that this man was not just a family friend but may have actually been their biological father. (The man they grew up knowing as their father was also rumored to be sterile, so it may have been an 'arrangement' back then rather than an affair.) Looking at photos of both them as old men, my grandfather was also suspiciously the spitting image of him. And damned if this test did not finally prove it true when some of its suggested cousins were right within the living generations of that family.

So I can vouch for the fact that this thing definitely works. I'm fascinated that it proved the rumor true. Although it's very odd that I actually have no connection to the surname of my grandfather and maiden name of my mom... She should have grown up with a different maiden name entirely. And "Uncle Bill" is no pretend uncle... he's my actual great grandfather. (And through whom we should have been better off, but that's another story...)

Prowler
03-17-2017, 11:19 PM
They prove it with ****ing DNA. Are you seriously one of those people who doubts legitimate science?
No? But considering how often borders have changed throughout history and how much people moved around it seems a bit hard to pinpoint it exactly. Saying someone has "German ancestors" or "Italian ancestors " is pretty vague since those countries, as we know today, are very modern and 19th century creations. And like Indigo said, they lump certain people together like the irish and the Scottish and I assume Scandinavians are lumped together as well. So yeah, how far can this test go?

Not sure how far back it can go. If humanity came out of Africa, then no, it doesn't go nearly back that far obliviously. After a while some things will be watered down enough that heritage far enough away may no longer show up simply because there is so little left and, in the DNA lottery, an individual did not inherit genes from it even though it still exists back in the family history somewhere.

These tests are not based on exact linage. It's more like taking a handful of playing cards, drawing a circle on the floor, throwing the cards into the air and seeing which ones land in the circle. Those being the genetics someone inherits. Do it again for a sibling and it may be similar, but a little different.

The tests done from my mom and uncle give me a rough idea, and the things that came out high for them are likely probably still a good amount in me too, but I can't tell exact lineage percentage from them since it's their own genetic makeup.

I can say it does work though, at least the ones we did through Ancestry.com. Because that site has their results combined with their database, it compares yours with other members who have done it and it matches up people who have similar results and are likely your cousins, with a probability given.

I have a couple second cousins that, unknown to us, had already also done this test and are members of the site, and it put them right up top.

There is also the old family rumor on my mom's side, of an old family friend my grandfather and his brother called "Uncle Bill." Thing is... it was always rumored and suspected that this man was not just a family friend but may have actually been their biological father. (The man they grew up knowing as their father was also rumored to be sterile, so it may have been an 'arrangement' back then rather than an affair.) Looking at photos of both them as old men, my grandfather was also suspiciously the spitting image of him. And damned if this test did not finally prove it true when some of its suggested cousins were right within the living generations of that family.

So I can vouch for the fact that this thing definitely works. I'm fascinated that it proved the rumor true. Although it's very odd that I actually have no connection to the surname of my grandfather and maiden name of my mom... She should have grown up with a different maiden name entirely. And "Uncle Bill" is no pretend uncle... he's my actual great grandfather. (And through whom we should have been better off, but that's another story...)
I see.

MsMarvelDuckie
03-18-2017, 11:41 AM
Considering they've been able to determine if someone is related to that mummy found in the peet bogs in England- and it was hundreds of years old- or the descendants of the king whose grave was recently uncovered in a construction site (forgot which one- think it was one of the Richards or Henrys or something) it can go pretty far back. Far enough to tell what someone's ethnic roots are even hundreds of years removed. Especially with families from certain regions that never went anywhere until the last couple centuries or so- because up until this country was colinized or later immigrants arrived, most people woyld remain in or near their home region their entire lives. DNA is a funny thing as Indigo said, it can pinpoint certain genes origin to a very specific place and even show who is related to whom, by markers that are different for each ethnic group!

Katie
03-19-2017, 09:59 AM
Here's how they know:

Basically your DNA, half from your mom and half from your dad belongs to DNA families called haplogroups. There are several haplogroups which correspond to different geographical areas. So, for instance, if your mom is white and dad is black, their DNA families would correspond to one of the European haplogroups for mom and one of the African haplogroups for dad.

The major haplogroups that show up in these DNA tests would be your closest relatives. But all through history people have migrated and comingled and intermarried and procreated so just because mom is white, that doesn't mean that she might not have Indian haplogroups mixed in or Native American or Iberian. And dad may have European mixed in. Thats how these tests can show minute percentages of unexpected DNA. Somewhere in history, near or, usually, far back, there was a wandering ancestor that made a splash in your genepool.

CyberCubed
03-19-2017, 01:01 PM
That's kinda why researching ancestory is kinda pointless. Of course you're going to have great grandparents or people from 200-300 years ago that mixed with different races or whatnot. People lived all over Europe and all over the America's, you're bound to have dozens of different races in your ancestors.

Does it really matter if you find out you're 5% Chinese? Or 5% Indian? Or 5% black? I mean does it really make a difference?

IndigoErth
03-19-2017, 01:13 PM
Depends on perspective. Some like you aren't interested, others find it fascinating. No one opinion on that gets to be the "right" one...

MsMarvelDuckie
03-19-2017, 05:27 PM
Ancestry tells the story of your family. It can tell you how when and where your ancestors lived, who they were and how it all came to create you. Knowing yoyr roots can tell you a lot about who you are. That's why people research it- to find out where they came from and know the story of their family.

CyberCubed
03-19-2017, 06:23 PM
But anyones ancestors can come from all over the world. We know how ancient civilizations lived, as well as people from the 1400's-1900's. It's no big mystery, it's in the history books.

MsMarvelDuckie
03-19-2017, 07:25 PM
I think you're missing the point though. It's all about PERSONAL history, about how where and what one's own family comes from. General history may be "in the books" but that doesn't tell us about the day to day lives of our own ancestors, or even who they were. One person's ancestors may have taken part in an important historical battle, or have ties to a famous historical figure, while another person's family was part of the slave trade or were immigrants from famine or war-torn countires. It's all a matter of what our PERSONAL ties to history are. That is what makes it interesting.

For instance, my hubby's ancestors first came to North America on the ship with William Penn, and have mostly remained in that same area for the last three hundred years. They were a mix of German and Irish, while mine came over in 1848-49, when three Irish brothers came through New York and later migrated to the mid-west during the Irish potato famine in that time. But my family traces back to the 1100's in County Armagh in the northern part of Ireland, with my grandmother's family being mainly German and French! Knowing who those people were makes the historic eras they lived in much more meaningful and personal, as I learned about some of the hardships and events they saw. Like it's easy to dismiss the bomb on Hiroshima as "a long time ago" until you see pictures taken by your own grandfather as a naval photographer in Japan after the event. (I have, and they were horiffic.) Things like this are important to us as individuals, because they tie our own lives to the past.

FredWolfLeonardo
03-19-2017, 07:46 PM
I think you're missing the point though. It's all about PERSONAL history, about how where and what one's own family comes from. General history may be "in the books" but that doesn't tell us about the day to day lives of our own ancestors, or even who they were. One person's ancestors may have taken part in an important historical battle, or have ties to a famous historical figure, while another person's family was part of the slave trade or were immigrants from famine or war-torn countires. It's all a matter of what our PERSONAL ties to history are. That is what makes it interesting.

For instance, my hubby's ancestors first came to North America on the ship with William Penn, and have mostly remained in that same area for the last three hundred years. They were a mix of German and Irish, while mine came over in 1848-49, when three Irish brothers came through New York and later migrated to the mid-west during the Irish potato famine in that time. But my family traces back to the 1100's in County Armagh in the northern part of Ireland, with my grandmother's family being mainly German and French! Knowing who those people were makes the historic eras they lived in much more meaningful and personal, as I learned about some of the hardships and events they saw. Like it's easy to dismiss the bomb on Hiroshima as "a long time ago" until you see pictures taken by your own grandfather as a naval photographer in Japan after the event. (I have, and they were horiffic.) Things like this are important to us as individuals, because they tie our own lives to the past.

I guess its also very special to look at your past family history when your family has strong ideas and values that have been passed down through the generations. Looking back and seeing what they stood up for, and then seeing your current family upholding those same values, is seeing their spirit and legacy continue to flourish even though they are no longer here.

It even extends to those outside of kin and can include even people who are completely unrelated but uphold the same values. Just look at the founding fathers of the United States, none of them are alive but their legacy and spirit continues to live through millions of Americans, most of whom are not biologically related to them.

IndigoErth
03-19-2017, 08:04 PM
Agree, very much missing the point. If it doesn't interest you, Cubed, you could, I dunno, ignore the thread and stick to pondering unstoppable ageing and sleep patterns...

Totally understandable that deeper topics aren't everyone's cup of tea.

CyberCubed
03-19-2017, 08:07 PM
My curiosity was sparked, but not too much. For all I know my great grandpappy could have been part of The Great Train robbery of 1886, but it won't make a difference to me. Hell speaking of that, most of our ancestors are probably murderers or criminals, because that's how people lived back then.

Prowler
03-19-2017, 08:18 PM
Some people are just curious, I guess. It might contradict my love for History, but never particularly cared about my family's history beyond my grandparents. And since I'm not close to the father side of my family whoever my paternal great grandparents were is irrelevant to me tbh.

I don't know much about my family past a couple of generations or so and never bother to research it. I don't think it matters much once you go too deep, especially into relatives your parents didn't even meet. Who truly matters to me are the people who raised me/I grew up around. Those are my family. My parents, my brother and maybe my maternal grandmother are the only people I'd actually call "family". The rest don't mater to me. And if I had ancestors from another/other country/countries it wouldn't make a difference to me since they're not my culture. Not saying it's the case of anyone ITT but it's kinda funny when someone from the Americas/Australia/NZ claims to be Irish/French/German... and doesn't even know much about those places or their culture or speaks their language. If your father is Italian OK, but if your great great great grandfather was German and didn't pass any cultural traits down to your other relatives then meh.

It seems some people from the Americas get a bit "hurt" when they go to, let's say, Republic of Ireland and people don't care that their grandfather was Irish and just view them as "American/Canadian/Argentinian/wtv".

My curiosity was sparked, but not too much. For all I know my great grandpappy could have been part of The Great Train robbery of 1886, but it won't make a difference to me. Hell speaking of that, most of our ancestors are probably murderers or criminals, because that's how people lived back then.
If we go back 600 hundred years or so then definitely, but just about 100-150 years? Doubt there's any shady people in my family tree.

IndigoErth
03-19-2017, 09:42 PM
It seems some people from the Americas get a bit "hurt" when they go to, let's say, Republic of Ireland and people don't care that their grandfather was Irish and just view them as "American/Canadian/Argentinian/wtv".
Yeah, I think anyone doing that is just trying to seek an hereditary identity that sounds cooler and more meaningful to them than their simple nationality. Which, lets be honest, in countries that are very much a "melting pot" as this one is and has few meaningful real traditions all its own, a national identity is pretty superficial. I can kind of understand, but they forget that their own ancestry may not be interesting to everyone. Esp if they run off and visit a place where that heritage is common and the least interesting topic of conversation. lol





Through the genealogy research I've done and the numerous documents available that I've poured over, no, I can't say I have found any murderers or criminals at this point... So far the family sounds to have been pretty much the same average, hard working family it is in this day and age.

The nearest I've got is one who was arrested for working at his mill on Sunday in the 1820s. Poor guy. lol A big offense then, but kind of hilarious looking back on it from this century. Wish there was more info on it.

MsMarvelDuckie
03-20-2017, 11:29 AM
My curiosity was sparked, but not too much. For all I know my great grandpappy could have been part of The Great Train robbery of 1886, but it won't make a difference to me. Hell speaking of that, most of our ancestors are probably murderers or criminals, because that's how people lived back then.


No, most of them really weren't. Dunno where you get that idea but most people no matter what point in history, were simply hard-working farmers ir laborers craftsmen or the like. Criminals in one's family tree are rare. That said, there is a suspected tie in mine to the James gang, and according to my uncle, my biological father (who was half Cherokee through his mother if my uncle's account is true- my mother is suspiciously evasive on his identity which if my uncle was telling the truth I can see why) was apparently tied to a local branch of the Mob or something. I say WAS because the man my uncle named has been dead for YEARS, buuuut..... He married and had kids with someone else which means I may have half-siblings I've never met!


Yeah, I think anyone doing that is just trying to seek an hereditary identity that sounds cooler and more meaningful to them than their simple nationality. Which, lets be honest, in countries that are very much a "melting pot" as this one is and has few meaningful real traditions all its own, a national identity is pretty superficial. I can kind of understand, but they forget that their own ancestry may not be interesting to everyone. Esp if they run off and visit a place where that heritage is common and the least interesting topic of conversation. lol

Through the genealogy research I've done and the numerous documents available that I've poured over, no, I can't say I have found any murderers or criminals at this point... So far the family sounds to have been pretty much the same average, hard working family it is in this day and age.

The nearest I've got is one who was arrested for working at his mill on Sunday in the 1820s. Poor guy. lol A big offense then, but kind of hilarious looking back on it from this century. Wish there was more info on it.


It's true some people (mostly USA) do just look at it as a way to give themselves some sort of cultural identity more interesting than just their country of birth, but finding that cultural history can often lead to a desire to learn more about that land and its people and traditions. It certainly has for me- enough so that I have acquired several books (e-books) to learn Irish Gaelic language. Partly I wanted to learn more about my heritage, and partly because I love Irish Celtic music and want to learn what the words to some of my favorite Celtic tunes mean.

plastroncafe
03-20-2017, 11:56 AM
The issue with using one's Nationality as an identity is that it tends to overshadow the fact that people move. People have always moved. Our genes aren't beholden to borders, and if they are...then that too is an interesting story.

Prowler
03-20-2017, 12:29 PM
The issue with using one's Nationality as an identity is that it tends to overshadow the fact that people move. People have always moved. Our genes aren't beholden to borders, and if they are...then that too is an interesting story.
I think if someone can't find a foreigner/immigrant in their family tree, at least in the last few generations, they won't have any doubts regarding their nationality.

But I also depends considering some countries have more defined national identities than others do. Like I've said, countries like Germany and Italy as we know them are fairly modern creations. A Sicilian is quite different from a person from Tuscany as is a Bavarian from a Hamburger.

In several countries you have regions where a big portion of the population wants independence. It's complicated.

If I had to put my finger on it, I'd say the most culturally homogeneous European countries where national identity is the strongest and where there's pretty much no regional separatism sentiment are Portugal, Iceland, Republic of Ireland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Ofc you'll find some differences between people from different regions inside those countries but compared to other's but those differences are so minimal compared to the differences between a Dutch speaking Belgian and a French speaking Belgian.

Cure
03-20-2017, 01:22 PM
My heritage sucks. Spanish music sucks, spanish traditions are dumb. The only good part is the food.

CyberCubed
03-20-2017, 03:16 PM
My great grandparents were born in Russia. Haha, I wonder if they said things like, "Da!" and "Comrade" and "Mother Russia."

Ahahaha. Just thinking that I have family from the 1800's from Russia, they are from the motherland. Hahahaa, I wonder if they knew Stalin.

Dust
03-20-2017, 04:08 PM
My great grandparents were born in Russia. Haha, I wonder if they said things like, "Da!" and "Comrade" and "Mother Russia."

Ahahaha. Just thinking that I have family from the 1800's from Russia, they are from the motherland. Hahahaa, I wonder if they knew Stalin.

They probably said "Da" as it means yes, the others are English words, why would they speak English, why would they know Stalin? Very odd questions.

My ethnicity is just British, bit boring I know, nothing too interesting I don't think.

CyberCubed
03-20-2017, 04:13 PM
Don't all Russians speak like that? That's what TV and movies have taught me over the last 30 years.

BubblyShell22
03-20-2017, 05:01 PM
Not everything from TV and movies is true though, Cubed.

FredWolfLeonardo
03-20-2017, 05:50 PM
Not everything from TV and movies is true though, Cubed.

True. Reminds me of a scene in the first episode of the Original Cartoon :lol:

Raphael: Don't we worry April we know all about humans!

April: How?

Michealangalo: We watch alot of tv

April: We're in Big trouble....

Katie
03-20-2017, 06:40 PM
My great grandparents were born in Russia. Haha, I wonder if they said things like, "Da!" and "Comrade" and "Mother Russia."

Ahahaha. Just thinking that I have family from the 1800's from Russia, they are from the motherland. Hahahaa, I wonder if they knew Stalin.

There's probably a good story there. Why did they leave Russia? Did they disagree with the revolution? Were they proletariat? Or Jewish?

Could be a fascinating story.

Dust
03-20-2017, 07:20 PM
Don't all Russians speak like that? That's what TV and movies have taught me over the last 30 years.

Stereotypes exist Cubed. Doesn't make them true just because they're on TV.

Utrommaniac
03-20-2017, 07:58 PM
Yeah, in 1800's Russia, their lives likely sucked. It was the time of the Tsars, long before Communism was a thing.

You might as well be basing their lives off Fiddler on the Roof.

Prowler
03-20-2017, 08:06 PM
There's probably a good story there. Why did they leave Russia? Did they disagree with the revolution? Were they proletariat? Or Jewish?

Could be a fascinating story.
Cubed has mentioned before he has Jewish relatives. He's a New Yorker, after all.

Honestly, Cubed really gives me a Larry David vibe, now that I think about it. Just watch some Curb Your Enthusiasm episodes and tell me if you don't get the same feeling.

ssjup81
03-20-2017, 08:38 PM
I wish I could trace my familyís history. Unfortunately, like many African Americans, itís a bit difficult to do. Some are lucky and are able to, but for some, maybe they can only go back a generation or two. I envy those who actually can go back centuries, knowing where they came from or lived and imagine what they couldíve gone through during that particular time in history. I didnít start thinking this way until maybe my mid-20s.

For my mother on her motherís side, we can go back as far as my great great grandmother. She was born in 1881. Not sure about my motherís fatherís side.

As for my fatherís family, I have nothing. My fatherís relatives were all pretty old so they died out before I even had a chance to start questioning it. All I know is that my grandparents were originally from North or South Carolina, but moved to New York. My grandmother died when my father was 19. My grandfather died when I was 11. My father also said that when he was very young, his grandfather was ďtaken away by white menĒ and never saw him again. No idea what all thatís about and neither does he.

So yeah, I would just like to know this for my own personal knowledge. Where is my family from? Where did I get my name, aside from the obvious (slave owners probably)? I have an Irish last name.

IndigoErth
03-23-2017, 06:16 PM
Sucks enough when there is a roadblock you can't find any way past, that's got to suck that much more when prejudice probably made records all the more scarce sooner in the paper trail. :ohwell: (Not to mention the older the records the less helpful they tend to be anyhow...) Bad enough that women's maiden names have often been disregarded and get lost.

edit: Than again, have you considered doing that DNA test via Ancestry someday? That it may be able to link you with unknown cousins, it might be able to connect you with some folks who might have some info on parts of the family you don't know much about.







I love the challenge of researching genealogy though, and the rewards when you piece something together.

I made the mistake of hunting around for clues on Ancestry.com and elsewhere yesterday evening...and didn't finally make myself go to bed until after 9am. :lol: Luckily I didn't have any plans (ok.. so I'll run to the store tomorrow instead) and slept until 2:30pm.

IF the info is accurate, I ended up managing to trace one branch back to the late 1500s, back to England. (That would be a set of 11x great grandparents!) The info gets a bit cloudy around then, so I'm not sure about the accuracy, but late 1600s on forward looks pretty sound. So that was a surprise.

Esp when on the flip side I've always had a great grandmother, my father's own grandmother, I can't get past, for all the years I have dug into this stuff. This woman may as well have just magically appeared on Earth at age 15 with no prior existence or relatives. Both fascinated and frustrated by this mystery and what little is known.

shuriken
06-12-2017, 01:06 AM
American by Birth but Mexican by the grace of God and a little something called dual citizenship. Both my folks were born in Mexico, and even though I'm a Chicagoan by birth, I'd love to move to Mexico one day, especially Morelia.

Utrommaniac
06-12-2017, 01:32 AM
My father also said that when he was very young, his grandfather was “taken away by white men” and never saw him again. No idea what all that’s about and neither does he.

Yikes :o ! Though...to be honest, it's obvious what happened :( .