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View Full Version : Your Culinary Specialty


MsMarvelDuckie
03-22-2017, 09:32 PM
Do you cook? If so, what's your "house special"? Are there certain dishes you kick butt with?

The pizza topping thread reminded me of one of mine so I thought I'd make this to share ideas. My two most awesome dishes are a "killer" baked shark steak that just melts in your mouth, and a recipe for Turkish chicken. I make a mean pot luck stew, too.

Prowler
03-22-2017, 09:33 PM
I can cook pasta, rice, grill meat and fish.

...and that's it.

ToTheNines
03-22-2017, 09:34 PM
Fried eggs.

MsMarvelDuckie
03-22-2017, 09:36 PM
Ok but what's your "best" dish? That one thing you make that is just awesome- that leaves em wantin' more?

CyberCubed
03-22-2017, 09:37 PM
Does frozen TV dinner count?

Prowler
03-22-2017, 09:37 PM
Ok but what's your "best" dish? That one thing you make that is just awesome- that leaves em wantin' more?
I dunno? I've never cooked for anyone else.

MsMarvelDuckie
03-22-2017, 09:41 PM
Does frozen TV dinner count?


Not really, no. I'm referring to actual cooking as opposed to just heating up a prepared meal someone else made or that comes in a box. Takeout doesn't count either.

Katie
03-22-2017, 10:15 PM
I have a few

First, Chicken Tortilla Soup. I've won prizes with this in cooking contests. And I do a turkey variation on the weekend after Thanksgiving for the Iron Bowl.

Roasted asparagus wrapped in bacon and filo dough

Brussels Sprouts roasted with almonds, cranberry rasins, and onions

Chicken and waffles

Collard greens

Basically any southern comfort / soul food I do pretty well.

And I grill a mean burger. :)

CyberCubed
03-22-2017, 10:31 PM
Well it's natural that women are better cooks then men, as seen by this thread already. Women know how to make dishes and cook well, men can barely make do with frozen food, sandwiches or take out food. There are exceptions of course given the male cooks/chefs you see around the world, but most men don't know how to cook beyond basic stuff.

Katie
03-22-2017, 10:39 PM
Haha. That's bullsh!t.

I learned all my cooking skills from my dad cause my mom is not a good cook. Since he died all she eats is salad and when I go sed her on the weekends, we cook.

CyberCubed
03-22-2017, 10:49 PM
None of the men in my family know how to cook, beyond basic stuff like heating up food or putting pasta, hot dogs, etc. into a frying pan or pot.

I tried cooking once, it was not a pretty sight. The fact that you have to remember temperatures and time to leave something in the oven, buy all this extra stuff to mix with it such as the ingrediants and toppings, then mix it all together, etc. It's a lot to remember.

Cure
03-22-2017, 11:50 PM
Fried eggs.

Scrambled for me.

Jephael
03-23-2017, 01:33 AM
I love making scrambled eggs. Get some English Muffins and American Cheese and I got myself a homemade Egg McMuffin!!!

Utrommaniac
03-23-2017, 01:51 AM
Apologies of the use of ancient memes...lotsa SPAGHETTI.

I try to mix it up a lot, trying new ways to prepare it. I've made some pretty good hand-made meatballs.

And Cubed...enough with that bullpoo about women being better cooks inherently. Unless you want Gordon Ramsey, Bobby Flay, Anthony Bordain, and Alton Brown to lead a roast on you. Just because you and other men in your family don't know how to cook doesn't mean that other men don't. It's broken logic and frankly insulting. I also learned some cooking skills from my father moreso than my mother - and insist that no one else can come close to his fried breakfast potatoes. They're magical.

ssjup81
03-23-2017, 02:55 AM
I guess for me baked spaghetti and chilli. Oh and my broccoli, rice casserole. Oh and creamed potatoes. I haven't prepared either in forever, though. I've also prepared apple pie from scratch once (too much work), used to make banana nut bread on occasion, and while stateside, I prepared sukiyaki from scratch for my parents. I just kept tasting the broth until it tasted ok. It's easy to do here in Japan as you can buy all the ingredients, like the broth stuff. Stateside I made it from scratch and improvised.

Cubed, get a damn cookbook.

ProphetofGanja
03-23-2017, 07:44 AM
Lately I've been making a lot of cheesy scrambled eggs with avocado toast and covering it all in spicy mango sauce. ****ing delicious

Other than that I like to do Mexican or Spanish food, and in the winter I do a really good stew/chili hybrid. My girlfriend and I also do something we call ghetto sushi (it's just shrimp and rice that we form into little balls)

Cubed, pick one of your favorite dishes and find a recipe and learn how to make it, you'll be surprised how easy and satisfying it is to cook for oneself. Start simple tho, don't jump straight into anything too advanced

blindturtle02
03-23-2017, 12:19 PM
I've been told that I make excellent oven fried pork chops. I prefer pork loin because I think they taste better. You just run them through milk, egg, then roll them around in some cracker crumbs. I tried progresso bread crumbs but didn't think they tasted as good as cracker. Then after battering, season them to your liking. Throw them in at 350 for 30 mins, then 375 for another 30. At least that's what I have to do with my oven to get the batter crispy enough. Oven temps vary and all. Other half says they taste fried. I fooled her the first time. Also been told by friends and family that I grill a good burger. Granted, it's a Foreman, but I'd rather not mess with one out doors. Besides, I can be right there by the oven to take out the fries or tots so everything's done on time.

IndigoErth
03-23-2017, 05:22 PM
Despite how Cubed may think the world is supposed to work... I rather dislike cooking and wouldn't consider myself good at it. I suppose I could do okay following directions, maybe, but the interest isn't there. It's such a time consuming hassle that I generally have no interest in being bothered with. And given that I'm generally just making it for me alone, I prefer to just keep it cheap, quick and simple. (Though trying to make it a little healthier these days.) If I'm going to put in the effort, I FAR more prefer things that make for good left overs for additional meals, esp stuff that still leaves me some for later after the family has had a share of it. The ONE thing that fits that which I don't mind making on a rare occasion is lasagna, so that would be my 'specialty.'

And none of that overabundance of ricotta crap... I only use shredded cheddar mixed with some mozzarella in every layer. Deep dish, ground beef, drowning in (onion-free) pasta sauce... (Now I wish I had the makings, the money, and the energy for it.)

MsMarvelDuckie
03-23-2017, 09:04 PM
Well it's natural that women are better cooks then men, as seen by this thread already. Women know how to make dishes and cook well, men can barely make do with frozen food, sandwiches or take out food. There are exceptions of course given the male cooks/chefs you see around the world, but most men don't know how to cook beyond basic stuff.

Yeah, suuure..... :trolleye: Tell that to my hubby. He grills a mean steak and is pretty good in the kitchen too. In fact he cooks more often than I do. His dad used to do a lot of cooking too, when he still had the strength for it before he died of cancer. And hubby's brother even makes (and sometimes sells) his own hot sauce!

CyberCubed
03-23-2017, 09:23 PM
So what do you guys suggest someone who has no real experience with cooking start off with? I can only cook/heat up basic things where they give you the instructions on the box.

The foods I like are various chicken, pasta, steak, ribs, turkey, etc. I don't eat fish though.

Prowler
03-23-2017, 09:26 PM
So what do you guys suggest someone who has no real experience with cooking start off with? I can only cook/heat up basic things where they give you the instructions on the box.

The foods I like are various chicken, pasta, steak, ribs, turkey, etc. I don't eat fish though.
...buy portions of chicken breast and grill them? You can google that and find out in 2 minutes how to do that. it's simple as hell.

You've been living on your own for several years now and yet can't cook anything?!

MsMarvelDuckie
03-23-2017, 09:30 PM
So what do you guys suggest someone who has no real experience with cooking start off with? I can only cook/heat up basic things where they give you the instructions on the box.

The foods I like are various chicken, pasta, steak, ribs, turkey, etc. I don't eat fish though.


Easy. Betty Crocker Cookbook. Has lots of easy and classic recipes and is easy to find in any bookstore or online. Never goes out of print!

ProphetofGanja
03-23-2017, 09:34 PM
So what do you guys suggest someone who has no real experience with cooking start off with? I can only cook/heat up basic things where they give you the instructions on the box.

The foods I like are various chicken, pasta, steak, ribs, turkey, etc. I don't eat fish though.

Google "perfect chicken breast" if you're going to be cooking chicken breasts. It's literally a fail-proof recipe if you follow it correctly. It's easy to overcook and dry out chicken breast but if you do it that way then you've got moist, juicy chicken breast to add to whatever else you're going to cook. I just cooked some and threw it on top of a frozen pizza when it was done cooking. Not the most sophisticated meal, but satisfying nonetheless.

There are plenty of good recipes for steak, steak is really pretty easy. Pasta too. Ribs are more intensive, as is cooking a whole turkey. Baby steps, man.

Utrommaniac
03-23-2017, 09:34 PM
Start with pasta. The very first thing I learned to cook on my own when I was eight - taught by both my parents.
It's literally just boiling water and putting the noodles in until they're soft. This is usually tested when they're limp.
I have to methods: taste test one to see if it's soft (at my house) or throw it at the a wall (at my mom's house). If it sticks, it's done.

Butter and cheese (and I've been adding black pepper and garlic salt lately) is a good topper after you drain it. Maybe even my personal favorite, aside from Alfredo sauce.

My brother, who is younger than me, is also a much better cook than I presently am, probably because he's more willing to work with meats that I don't really care for. And because he works at Starbucks full-time, has also taken to making amazing coffees and simple syrups. The caramel syrup he makes is godly. Even if it gathers some sugar crystals after sitting in the fridge untouched.

IndigoErth
03-23-2017, 10:10 PM
Or do pasta the 'lazy' way and get that "As Seen on Tv" Pasta Boat and throw the pasta in the microwave instead. :P (That thing is pretty handy, btw.) And get other stuff together while that does its thing.

(Alternately I sometimes throw the pasta in a big microwave safe glass bowl (covered) instead, but it doesn't contain the water nearly as well...)

Pasta is a good staple though, I use it plenty. Inexpensive easy base for various things and hard to ruin cooking it. Although it doesn't offer all that much nutritionally speaking so personally I've switched over to the whole wheat/grain variety.

Utrommaniac
03-23-2017, 11:36 PM
Well, that's why you usually wouldn't eat it on its own, but with other stuff.

IndigoErth
03-24-2017, 01:18 AM
I mean the pasta itself... How it's eaten, or with what, not withstanding.

edit: Same as I prefer whole grain breads, etc as well anymore, white bread just sounds so pointless to me in most cases. (Not that I was ever much a fan of it anyhow, save for the occasional toast or grilled cheese.)

AT-Man
03-24-2017, 07:30 AM
I can make pretty good gravy for certain meat dishes. One of my favorites is salmon covered with smetana and honey, it's super easy to make and delicious every time.

ProactiveMan
03-24-2017, 10:23 AM
I can make a pretty nice risotto, and I like to improvise and make up risotto recipes.

MsMarvelDuckie
03-24-2017, 05:15 PM
Some really great ideas being tossed around! I loves me some pasta, doesn't matter what kind. Best with a tomato or cream sauce, but good with a little olive oil, butter, lemon juice and seasonings too.

One of my personal favorite things to make when I can find them are sauteed wild puffballs. These are the giant round mushrooms that pop up in pastures or yards and pop open with a puff of "smoke" when kicked or disturbed when they are mature. One has to get them while they are still soft and spongy inside, but once cooked- DELISH! Has a texture like soft bread, and a very delicate flavor compared to regular table mushrooms. They are easy to recognize since nothing else looks like them. Big round and squishy! If the inside is even a little dark thoufh, they are no longer good. Must be pure white and soft inside. I like them with olive oil, butter, lemon pepper and garlic.

ssjup81
03-26-2017, 03:45 AM
Hey Cubed, you should try Blue Apron.

Ninjinister
03-26-2017, 04:21 AM
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/9c/3b/1e/9c3b1ebf7a1af668a2045cb3727de42a.png

Utrommaniac
03-26-2017, 04:25 PM
Hey Cubed, you should try Blue Apron.

It's a little on the pricey side. My mother tried it for a while, and while it was amazing, still cost us a little more than she liked.

ToTheNines
03-26-2017, 04:34 PM
We liked it, too. It's delicious and they have great vegetarian options. It was a little pricey but it saves you a grocery store trip. We only cancelled because our work schedules are so crazy and stuff was going bad sitting so long.