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Andrew NDB
07-11-2017, 02:18 PM
I know it seems like I'm harping on figures of speech lately... but does anyone have any inkling what's going on with this? Where did it come from?

At first I thought it was just some kind of thing synonymous with "I think I'm in love" or something, i.e., "Got me feelin' some kind of way," but that doesn't appear to always be the case.

I was speaking to a friend just the other day who was describing to me why he had to, essentially, snitch out someone at work who was talking bad about the boss when his boss was family. "He got me feelin' some kinda way, you know?" Up until this year, this is nothing I've ever heard him say.

What's the story with this?

IndigoErth
07-11-2017, 02:31 PM
I don't think there is an exact 'feeling' associated with it, more-so a feeling that can't quite be described or just don't want to put words to. I've seen it more often used for a weird/off/mildly negative/etc kind of feeling, though sometimes positive.

I probably started hearing this phrase more than a decade ago.

TurtleWA
07-11-2017, 02:42 PM
Never quite heard it put that way. But sounds like someone is having some conflicting feelings over "snitching" and loyalty towards family. Reminds me of when people say gave me the "feels." Or however it goes. It's like they recognize a feeling. But can't name it for whatever reason. Tough situation, good luck to your friend.

plastroncafe
07-11-2017, 02:45 PM
I've never heard this particular turn of phrase.

Spike Spiegel
07-11-2017, 03:13 PM
"some type of way" (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=some%20type%20of%20way)

A phrase meaning I'm unable to express the complexity of the emotion at the moment. Can be used seriously or in jest.

Andrew NDB
07-11-2017, 03:18 PM
"some type of way" (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=some%20type%20of%20way)

Huh. Well that explains it. And from 5 years ago? I feel like it's literally just catching on in the last few months.

IndigoErth
07-11-2017, 04:10 PM
I'm curious where it started though. The first place I was probably seeing it was from at least a couple Native folks on a forum and that was as early as Spring 2004. Two of them were a Lakota married couple in South Dakota. Maybe the phrase is originally from that state/region? Unless the Lakota started it themselves. (Though it wasn't just that couple I'd seen use it. Seemed more mid-west in general.)

Krutch
07-11-2017, 04:41 PM
Slang comes and goes. Up until last month, I'd never heard anyone use "salty" to describe someone. Now its all I hear.

Andrew NDB
07-11-2017, 04:42 PM
Up until last month, I'd never heard anyone use "salty" to describe someone. Now its all I hear.

I've been hearing that quite a bit over the last year or two.

"Look at him over there. He still salty."

"Don't be all salty. I know you miss me."

ProphetofGanja
07-11-2017, 05:32 PM
-KKbdErJkiY

ProactiveMan
07-11-2017, 07:27 PM
Slang comes and goes. Up until last month, I'd never heard anyone use "salty" to describe someone. Now its all I hear.

Yeah, I noticed that too. I think I first heard it in it's current context about two years ago, and increasingly lately. It seems to mean that someone is angry or bitter now, whereas in the past it meant they were seasoned, experienced, or tough. Like a salty old dog

I was watching some Clint Eastwood movie from the 70s and he referred to some criminal types as 'salty looking dudes'. I took it to mean they looked like rough customers.

CyberCubed
07-12-2017, 12:37 AM
Slang comes and goes. Up until last month, I'd never heard anyone use "salty" to describe someone. Now its all I hear.

Salty is used all over tumblr regularly now. I have no idea when this started either.

Instead of saying people are, "annoyed," or "irritated" or even "butt-hurt" now we have....."salty."

Turo602
07-12-2017, 02:03 AM
"Salty" isn't even new. I've heard it used quite regularly around the early 2000s up until people started using "treated" and "owned."

CyberCubed
07-12-2017, 03:32 AM
Back then it was, "OWNED," "You got Served" "PWNED!" and:

"WE ROXXXXOR YOUR BOXXXORS!"

I was in High School in the early 2000's, I remember it all clearly.

ToTheNines
07-12-2017, 04:41 AM
I've been hearing that quite a bit over the last year or two.

"Look at him over there. He still salty."

"Don't be all salty. I know you miss me."

http://i2.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/922/014/7e4.jpg

Krutch
07-12-2017, 06:14 AM
I actually read it for the first time on a Juggalo board and figured it was part of their verbiage (such as "fresh" and "stale" equate to "cool" and "lame", respectively.) Then I saw it everywhere. Then I heard it everywhere.

Can't wait for this to go the way of the YOLO.

Storm Eagle
07-12-2017, 07:06 AM
I've always wondered about "looking at someone sideways".

TurtleWA
07-12-2017, 09:49 AM
This thread is on fleek.

Andrew NDB
07-12-2017, 10:27 AM
I was watching some Clint Eastwood movie from the 70s and he referred to some criminal types as 'salty looking dudes'. I took it to mean they looked like rough customers.

That's definitely not the same usage of it. In that context it's like, "look at those tough hombres!" But nowadays it's, like, explaining someone being bitter about something, generally someone jilted by a woman but not always.

Back then it was, "OWNED," "You got Served" "PWNED!" and:

"WE ROXXXXOR YOUR BOXXXORS!"

I was in High School in the early 2000's, I remember it all clearly.

That's right, OWNED became PWNED. And don't forget 133t

Andrew NDB
07-12-2017, 10:37 AM
NsYVDWitY58

IndigoErth
07-12-2017, 10:53 AM
"WE ROXXXXOR YOUR BOXXXORS!"

https://68.media.tumblr.com/8ec013c7d1e746fa6def56dd7c2a8060/tumblr_inline_o6bmkljyQz1tpmuhi_500.gif

You just made that up now, right?

CyberCubed
07-12-2017, 11:44 AM
No, they said that. It's even put into Mario and Luigi 1 on GBA back in 2003 when it was common lingo:

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/IumxXhPf7t8/0.jpg

They even put L33T in it:

https://www.mariowiki.com/images/0/01/Mario%2C_Luigi%2C_and_the_babies_meeting_the_Hamme r_Bros.png

ProactiveMan
07-14-2017, 02:40 AM
1337 is a whole can of worms on it's own. I hope it confuses linguists in the future... that would be totes amaze!

CyberCubed
07-16-2017, 05:09 PM
Also, when did "My bad" become mainstream? I remember hearing it a lot for the first time when I was in middle school and then High School. For me this was around 1998-2003. I don't ever recall hearing "My bad" before that.

People would say, "My bad" when they made a mistake or did something wrong. Instead of saying, "My mistake," or "Oops" or "How unfortunate" they would say, "My bad."

Is that still said today?