PDA

View Full Version : A thread for Documentaries


TurtleWA
07-23-2017, 02:23 PM
Anyone see any of the below listed films? Thoughts?

Watched:
Dumb: The Story of Big Brother Magazine (2017)
Gameplay (2013)
Batman & Bill (2017)

Half way through watching:
Chasing Coral (2017)

Want to watch soon:
Plastic Galaxy: The Story of Star Wars Toys (2014)

If you like the MTV show Jackass I would recommend "Dumb." If your into video game history check out "Gameplay." And if you dislike Bob Kane watch "Batman&Bill." If your a big global climate change person "Chasing Coral" is for you. Or if your on acid because some of the underwater scenes will blow your mind. I'm excited to watch "Plastic Galaxy" even though I'm not a huge Star Wars person. It looks great!

You watch any documentaries lately good/bad?

Autbot_Benz
07-23-2017, 02:35 PM
I Know That Voice (2013) John Dimaggio made it. It was all about voice acting its really interesting.

Ghostheads (2016): A Doc about Ghostbuster Fans

Back In Time (2015): All about Back to the Future

ZariusTwo
07-23-2017, 02:59 PM
D24ZWw5ZVXI

CyberCubed
07-23-2017, 03:01 PM
Jackie Chan: My Stunts from 1999 was fantastic, and shows how much work Jackie Chan does in his movies. I'm pretty sure the whole thing is on youtube too.

Jackie was still fairly young and agile in 1999 (even if he was like 40 already, lol), so it's fun to watch Jackie when he could still do stuff near his prime.

Utrommaniac
07-23-2017, 05:52 PM
Now, it's not an "official" documentary and more of a "school project" documentary, but this one on Chris Chan (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXjnakAlF) is a delight of going down a slope covered in oil.

The Business of Being Born is an interesting one on hospital maternity practices, and thankfully doesn't shoot itself in the foot on having a "homebirth w/midwife only!!!" bias, but still discusses that there are some severe (and dangerous) problems within overmedicated hospital birthing practices that have been carrying on for the past fifty years or so. (Annnnnd then the ever-so-boring sequel came out that involved someone blaming the rising Autism rates on inducements/epidurals and...yeah, f*ck you, lady.

The original Cosmos is an absolute joy to this day, and the new version is awesome as well, but it's just not the same without the oh-so-ethereal original theme music (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80Lwj_ybVno)

ProphetofGanja
07-23-2017, 06:38 PM
Planet Earth I & II
Life
The New Cosmos with Neil deGrasse Tyson
Richard Hammond's Invisible World
PBS Forces of Nature
Babies
Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman

ProactiveMan
07-23-2017, 08:31 PM
I saw Batman and Bill last weekend. It's an interesting topic, and the comic panel motion graphics were really cool. I think I would have liked it better if it focused more on Finger and Kane and less on the guy who was doing the research. Don't get me wrong, the research was important, but the guy's family life and background wasn't, at least not proportional to the time the documentary spends on it.

I could rattle off a million Documentaries, but I think my favourite is Bigger Stronger Faster. It's about steroids.

If that's not your bag, check out the 'making of' docs on the Alien Quadrillogy DVDs. They are really insightful, and don't pull any punches.

sdp
07-23-2017, 08:51 PM
I recommend the Rockafire Explosion Documentary (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTmhS6hcY-A), it basically tells the story of Showbiz Pizza and the characters they used and how they became Chuck-E-Cheese and we see the lives of 3 people including the creator. It's one of those documentaries you don't expect to like but it just works.

There's also King of Kong (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4v15X8Px34) which is a doc. on Donkey Kong high scores, also not something you'd expect to like but it's awesome, especially if you followed it back in the day when it was released and G4 even broadcast the live try to beat the score at E3 2007 I think, since then the score has only gotten crazier but the story hasn't been as awesome. There are some "spiritual" "sequels" like ghosts in the arcade and man vs snake but they aren't as good as this one but they scratch the itch if you want more.


I love documentaries though I mostly watch history/science documentaries, not big on most biographies unless said person is a scientist/historian/historical figure.

Also, no one is going to recommend the TMNT doc from fellow dromer? I remember it was pretty good and there's a second one coming.

TurtleWA
07-23-2017, 09:02 PM
Wow a lot that I haven't seen and a few that I have. My list is growing.

Now, it's not an "official" documentary and more of a "school project" documentary, but this one on Chris Chan (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXjnakAlF) is a delight of going down a slope covered in oil.

The Business of Being Born is an interesting one on hospital maternity practices, and thankfully doesn't shoot itself in the foot on having a "homebirth w/midwife only!!!" bias, but still discusses that there are some severe (and dangerous) problems within overmedicated hospital birthing practices that have been carrying on for the past fifty years or so. (Annnnnd then the ever-so-boring sequel came out that involved someone blaming the rising Autism rates on inducements/epidurals and...yeah, f*ck you, lady.

The original Cosmos is an absolute joy to this day, and the new version is awesome as well, but it's just not the same without the oh-so-ethereal original theme music (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80Lwj_ybVno)

"The Business of Being Born" was eye opening. If it's the one I am thinking about I seen it a couple years ago. I thought it was interesting how the doctors could schedule the C-sections around golfing times and how nature was pushed aside. If I remember correctly.

I saw Batman and Bill last weekend. It's an interesting topic, and the comic panel motion graphics were really cool. I think I would have liked it better if it focused more on Finger and Kane and less on the guy who was doing the research. Don't get me wrong, the research was important, but the guy's family life and background wasn't, at least not proportional to the time the documentary spends on it.

I could rattle off a million Documentaries, but I think my favourite is Bigger Stronger Faster. It's about steroids.

If that's not your bag, check out the 'making of' docs on the Alien Quadrillogy DVDs. They are really insightful, and don't pull any punches.
I know what you mean it was almost two movies one about Bill Finger and one about the researcher. Yes I seen BSF and in that similar vein "pumping iron" is an oldie but goodie. It has Arnold being Arnold and trying to punk Lou Ferrigno in portions.

Storm Eagle
07-23-2017, 09:48 PM
If your into video game history check out "Gameplay."

Since you mentioned video games, I was reminded of a documentary I once watched called GTFO. It's about the misogyny that females face in the video game community. There are a lot of women and girls who seem to look down on video games. So I'm glad for the ones who don't, but it sucks how a lot of them get attacked for trying to become a part of something that mostly guys are known for.

I Know That Voice (2013) John Dimaggio made it. It was all about voice acting its really interesting.

Ghostheads (2016): A Doc about Ghostbuster Fans

Back In Time (2015): All about Back to the Future

I own a copy of the former. I have a lot of respect for the craft of voice acting. So another good documentary on it is Adventures in Voice Acting. As for the last two you mentioned, I've seen them and they're both great.

There was a documentary on PBS about the love lives of adults on the spectrum called Autism in Love. Another one that was on PBS is called Accidental Courtesy, which is about a black man who set out to meet racists and learn how they became that way, and he says that he has gotten some of them to change their views. Both are on Netflix now.

TurtleWA
07-23-2017, 10:24 PM
I Know That Voice (2013) John Dimaggio made it. It was all about voice acting its really interesting.

Ghostheads (2016): A Doc about Ghostbuster Fans

Back In Time (2015): All about Back to the Future

Do you happen to know if 'Back In Time' is on Hulu or Netflix?

Since you mentioned video games, I was reminded of a documentary I once watched called GTFO. It's about the misogyny that females face in the video game community. There are a lot of women and girls who seem to look down on video games. So I'm glad for the ones who don't, but it sucks how a lot of them get attacked for trying to become a part of something that mostly guys are known for.



I own a copy of the former. I have a lot of respect for the craft of voice acting. So another good documentary on it is Adventures in Voice Acting. As for the last two you mentioned, I've seen them and they're both great.

There was a documentary on PBS about the love lives of adults on the spectrum called Autism in Love. Another one that was on PBS is called Accidental Courtesy, which is about a black man who set out to meet racists and learn how they became that way, and he says that he has gotten some of them to change their views. Both are on Netflix now.

Yeah and most of those guys that attack the girls are probably gamer snobs. Harassing even other dudes that happen to be new to gaming. But yeah the "fake gamer girl" or "fake nerd girl" thing is all over the internet too. :-?

Utrommaniac
07-24-2017, 12:28 AM
"The Business of Being Born" was eye opening. If it's the one I am thinking about I seen it a couple years ago. I thought it was interesting how the doctors could schedule the C-sections around golfing times and how nature was pushed aside. If I remember correctly.
Yeah, that's the one. I wasn't thinking of that as an example, but on the other factors that make the unnecessary c-section rate explode in the US (not knowing how to handle breech/posterior position or just simply not knowing how/wanting to deal with natural labors in general, especially if they take a long time to get through, not wanting to be at work during holidays).


It's been awhile since it was taken off Netflix, and thus it's been awhile since I've seen it, but I think it mostly covered the abusive tactics used in maternity care (which boy, I wonder why the US maternal mortality rate in the US is so high, especially in Texas!)

Storm Eagle
07-24-2017, 04:46 AM
Do you happen to know if 'Back In Time' is on Hulu or Netflix?



It's just on Netflix.

ProactiveMan
07-24-2017, 05:46 PM
I know what you mean it was almost two movies one about Bill Finger and one about the researcher. Yes I seen BSF and in that similar vein "pumping iron" is an oldie but goodie. It has Arnold being Arnold and trying to punk Lou Ferrigno in portions.
Pumping Iron is great. Have you seen Generation Iron? It's sort of a follow-up centering around the modern Mr Olympia competition. It's very interesting to see how much it's changed since Arnold's heyday.

TurtleWA
07-24-2017, 06:13 PM
Pumping Iron is great. Have you seen Generation Iron? It's sort of a follow-up centering around the modern Mr Olympia competition. It's very interesting to see how much it's changed since Arnold's heyday.

Yeah, I use to watch a lot of fitness shows for motivation to workout. Haven't been to the gym in almost two years. Guess I should have kept watching them :lol:. Things sure have changed a lot since Arnold's day forsure.

I got around to watching Plastic Galaxy. It was good and worth watching. A big focus on Kenner toys and the employees. Still haven't finished Chasing Coral.

Back In Time is next on my watch list.

plastroncafe
07-24-2017, 07:51 PM
King of Kong is phenomenal!
I never thought I could have so many feelings able Donkey Kong.

I'd also suggest Fog of War to folks who have an interest in modern history.

Utrommaniac
07-24-2017, 08:45 PM
Attacking the Devil: Harold Evans and the Last Nazi War Crime is an awesome documentary discussing the fight against Distillers in the production of Thalidomide pills. From the reason why they produced it, to the sketchy use to treat morning sickness - which in turn caused deformations in developing pregnancies of various extents. I think the "Last Nazi War Crime" bit is a bit on the nose, since they don't discuss that connection until the very, very end of the documentary.

The Thalidomide disaster itself is fascinating, but the families affected by it struggling for justice are even more so...especially when they've only been getting their justice in recent years.

DestronMirage22
07-24-2017, 11:48 PM
Atari: Game Over is a neat retrospective on the downfall of Atari and it tells the interesting story of those E.T. carts found in that landfill.

I don't really watch documentaries but I liked that one quite a bit.

ProactiveMan
07-25-2017, 03:24 AM
Since we're talking about documentaries... does anyone care that they are often full of s**t? I ask because I don't really. I love King of Kong, but from what I hear it plays pretty fast and loose with the truth, and Pumping Iron may as well be scripted... but I don't care as long as they're well made and entertaining.

I don't know what that says about me.

sdp
07-25-2017, 09:40 AM
Any good documentary has to twist an angle and edit it so there can be a narrative, that doesn't mean "bad" for them to do it since it's what you have to do to make it more compelling.

But yeah you have to take it with a grain of salt and know that it's not all "one sided" like documentaries make it out to be, whether it's blackfish or even an inconvenient truth which are both excellent documentaries and I'm on "their" side of the issue, you have to know that they choose the interview scenes to make people look "bad' or "good" depending on their narrative.

Using King of Kong as an example, the "bad guy" Billy Mitchell is actually one of the the "good guys" in "man vs snake". He was really mad how he was portrayed in King of Kong but he made such an excellent villain there, not to mention that even if that angle was played out, you can tell from interviews that Mitchell even if not the huge Jerk that he is in king of kongs, definitely has a "strong" personality and likely a Trump voter but he isn't a huge ****ing bad guy as much as Leonard Cohen's "Everybody Knows (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lin-a2lTelg) plays in the background and with your feelings.

TurtleWA
07-25-2017, 11:44 AM
Since we're talking about documentaries... does anyone care that they are often full of s**t? I ask because I don't really. I love King of Kong, but from what I hear it plays pretty fast and loose with the truth, and Pumping Iron may as well be scripted... but I don't care as long as they're well made and entertaining.

I don't know what that says about me.

Any good documentary has to twist an angle and edit it so there can be a narrative, that doesn't mean "bad" for them to do it since it's what you have to do to make it more compelling.

But yeah you have to take it with a grain of salt and know that it's not all "one sided" like documentaries make it out to be, whether it's blackfish or even an inconvenient truth which are both excellent documentaries and I'm on "their" side of the issue, you have to know that they choose the interview scenes to make people look "bad' or "good" depending on their narrative.

Using King of Kong as an example, the "bad guy" Billy Mitchell is actually one of the the "good guys" in "man vs snake". He was really mad how he was portrayed in King of Kong but he made such an excellent villain there, not to mention that even if that angle was played out, you can tell from interviews that Mitchell even if not the huge Jerk that he is in king of kongs, definitely has a "strong" personality and likely a Trump voter but he isn't a huge ****ing bad guy as much as Leonard Cohen's "Everybody Knows (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lin-a2lTelg) plays in the background and with your feelings.

Yeah film makers do have a point of view in which they focus the story. I don't watch thinking the films are completely accurate. I understand most film makers shape the movie through their partial experience of the subject, and that this partial knowledge is often translated into a complete truth. I watch for entertainment and to be informed of another's perspective. It doesn't bother me that the films have a message or agenda. It also doesn't bother me if scripted or one perspective is left out. I understand there are two sides of the story and try not to let my own opinion be shaped to much by the film. Blackfish did make me hate Seaworld. :lol:

ProactiveMan
07-25-2017, 08:22 PM
Yeah film makers do have a point of view in which they focus the story. I don't watch thinking the films are completely accurate. I understand most film makers shape the movie through their partial experience of the subject, and that this partial knowledge is often translated into a complete truth. I watch for entertainment and to be informed of another's perspective. It doesn't bother me that the films have a message or agenda. It also doesn't bother me if scripted or one perspective is left out. I understand there are two sides of the story and try not to let my own opinion be shaped to much by the film. Blackfish did make me hate Seaworld. :lol:

I agree. You have to go in with your eyes open, but a good movie is a good movie.


Using King of Kong as an example, the "bad guy" Billy Mitchell is actually one of the the "good guys" in "man vs snake". He was really mad how he was portrayed in King of Kong but he made such an excellent villain there, not to mention that even if that angle was played out, you can tell from interviews that Mitchell even if not the huge Jerk that he is in king of kongs, definitely has a "strong" personality and likely a Trump voter but he isn't a huge ****ing bad guy as much as Leonard Cohen's "Everybody Knows (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lin-a2lTelg) plays in the background and with your feelings.

I've heard Billy Mitchell is pretty cool; he still comes off as a bit of a tool in other things I've seen him in though. I do feel bad for Brian Kuh. The way they edited that whole Funspot section made him look like a total creep, but apparently a lot of it was used out of order and recontextualized. The story needed him to be LeFou to Billy Mitchell's Gaston, but that was mostly created in editing. Still a great movie though.

MikeandRaph87
07-26-2017, 06:06 PM
Is there a way to watch Batman and Bill without a Hulu account? I have been wanting to see that one.

Ken Burns Baseball(1994/2010), the ten inning(part) documentary series truly captures the spirit of the sport.

Ken Burns Civil War(1990)is a great insight look at what the average person was going through.

America: The Story of US(2010)is an engaging series that can unterest the average viewer. I can attedt to that through showing parts in class. The downside is it skips over WWI and has four commenters that would go on to become infamous a short while later.

Utrommaniac
07-26-2017, 06:42 PM
Your Inner Fish - A three-part documentary covering the most primordial traits of humans that goes back millions of years to the first fish to develop spines

Nine Months that Made You - Not really talking about fetal development, but more about the genetic "ticks" that can change in the midst of fetal development. Like how extra fingers develop, or how someone's organs can be "opposite" of how they are for others.

I'm currently watching Morphed: When Whales had Legs....and I just can't with the narrator's voice :lol: . It's so deep!

ProphetofGanja
07-26-2017, 08:42 PM
Your Inner Fish - A three-part documentary covering the most primordial traits of humans that goes back millions of years to the first fish to develop spines

Nine Months that Made You - Not really talking about fetal development, but more about the genetic "ticks" that can change in the midst of fetal development. Like how extra fingers develop, or how someone's organs can be "opposite" of how they are for others.

I'm currently watching Morphed: When Whales had Legs....and I just can't with the narrator's voice :lol: . It's so deep!

All those sound really cool

Utrommaniac
07-26-2017, 09:21 PM
They really are cool. Though, the best part of the Inner Fish is just the fish part. There's also two parts after that, but they're not nearly as fascinating. The others being Inner Reptile and Inner Monkey.

I've found that when things get into Ape Ancestry on human biology, things get a little more "meh". It happened in Walking with Cavemen too.

Speaking of which...

Walking with Dinosaurs, though obviously outdated by now, is a classing. But Walking with Beasts (post-dinosaur mammals) and Walking with Monsters (pre-dinosaur arthropods/reptiles) are also great. Walking With Cavemen is the last installment, but starting with the absence of the original narrator, it's just missing something that the other three had.

I personally like to watch them in "chronological order"
Monsters, Dinosaurs, Beasts, and Cavemen if I'm bothered.

9 Months has some portions that are extremely fascinating, such as a population in the Dominican Republic where there's a high rate biological boys are born looking like biological girls, called "Guevedoces", who don't develop their...maleness...until around the time they start puberty. Another is a separate East Indian population where the entire population is literally colorblind, seeing the world in black and white. Which of course means enormous complications during daytime, and tremendous advantages at night.

TurtleWA
07-27-2017, 09:00 PM
Is there a way to watch Batman and Bill without a Hulu account? I have been wanting to see that one.
Hulu is how I watched it so I am uncertain if it's available other places. Wish I was more of a help. Worth tracking down forsure.


Seen 'Back In Time' which was mentioned previously in this thread. Thanks for the recommendation. I enjoyed it. Surprising that Ernest Cline was in parts of it considering I had just found out who he was from the 'Ready Player One' threads.

Also watched 'Deep Web' (2015) it explored the events surrounding Silk Road, bitcoin & the issues around the dark web.

sdp
07-27-2017, 09:08 PM
I loved Walking with Dinosaurs when it came out but watched it like 3 years ago and it didn't hold up, it's still good but I remember thinking it was the best documentary ever. I remember finding walking with monsters a bit boring, I need to check out the other ones though. I remember around 2010 I think we got a few Dinosaur documentaries but don't remember their names.

Deep Web is not a great representation of the deep web and what those services are, it's ok but it can mislead people.

I've been tempted in watching Back in Time and Ghostcorps but if I'm a fan of those movies I just don't see what I could find interesting in those documentaries.

Spike Spiegel
07-28-2017, 09:35 AM
Your Inner Fish - A three-part documentary covering the most primordial traits of humans that goes back millions of years to the first fish to develop spines



This was one of the final nails in the coffin as I was deconverting from a fundamentalist, Biblical-literalist Christian to a more secular, science-based viewpoint. The bit about why human testicles are located outside the body particularly surprised me.

After recently viewing them, I recommend:

Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boogie_Man:_The_Lee_Atwater_Story)
Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story is a 2008 U.S. documentary on the campaign tactics used by Lee Atwater, while working on the George H. W. Bush's 1988 presidential election campaign, and how those tactics have transformed presidential campaigns in the United States.

The Central Park Five
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Central_Park_Five)
The Central Park Five is a 2012 documentary film about the Central Park jogger case, directed by documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, his daughter Sarah Burns, and her husband David McMahon.[1] It was released in the US on November 23, 2012.

Storm Eagle
07-28-2017, 09:57 PM
For those of you who might be fans of The Clash, I just remembered I'm currently borrowing a documentary about Joe Strummer from the library. It's called The Future is Unwritten.