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TurtleWA
07-28-2017, 12:07 AM
What would you do with an entire week with no internet, television, radio, phone or other devices?

Somewhat of a difficult question and I'm still considering this myself as I just thought about it. How about you?

edit: After a little thinking I would definitely clean and read more. After I read and cleaned everything I own, build something new or pickup an old hobby.

Cryomancer
07-28-2017, 12:08 AM
Clean the house I guess

Andrew NDB
07-28-2017, 12:11 AM
What I do every year for a week when I go into the deep forest with buddies. Shoot stuff, fish, camp, and drink a lot of water through a "life straw."

Cure
07-28-2017, 12:16 AM
Kill myself.

Powder
07-28-2017, 12:17 AM
I do it sometimes. Read, create art, organize/clean, meditate, etc.

That said, just 'cause I can do it doesn't mean it has no downside or that I'd wanna live that life long-term.

FredWolfLeonardo
07-28-2017, 12:21 AM
Its actually not that bad if youre patient and have other people with you.

I used to go on camping trips that were about a week long on average and we generally didnt have any technology aside from cell phones for contacting people. No Internet, tv, radio or other electronics though.

Granted, when you go out camping with friends, theres alot of social contact. with each other which keeps you entertained and occupied. The true challange would be to spend time without technology and without friends.

Cryomancer
07-28-2017, 12:30 AM
With friends is easy. Get out the dice and pencils.

snake
07-28-2017, 12:51 AM
Read. Read a lot.

CyberCubed
07-28-2017, 01:10 AM
People still go camping as adults?

newfan
07-28-2017, 02:02 AM
Hmm so I guess landlines are out also (just thinking of contacting people)

I'd be busy doing things with my children and when alone, organise the house more, reading/art.
I'd still miss it though.

Cryomancer
07-28-2017, 02:11 AM
People still go camping as adults?

Absolutely. I work at a place where people go camping every weekend. It's mostly an excuse to get drunk, far as I can tell.

Candy Kappa
07-28-2017, 02:35 AM
Easy, playing D&D, creating artworks and reading.

plastroncafe
07-28-2017, 08:55 AM
Let me think back to what I was doing in 1999....

Spike Spiegel
07-28-2017, 09:03 AM
Several comic book pages, along with lots of cooking, exercise, and reading.

TurtleWA
07-28-2017, 10:12 AM
Let me think back to what I was doing in 1999....

Think of any specifics? :)

I was in the middle of high-school. Or probably watching The Big Lebowski on VHS and playing N64. All on something resembling this...

plastroncafe
07-28-2017, 10:36 AM
Think of any specifics? :)


Make out with my boyfriend.
Study.
Read.
Go to football games/rehearsal/larp.

Original TMNT Cartoon Fan
07-28-2017, 12:35 PM
Do you count CD players, cassette tapers or even grammophones into this too, Turtle WA?

TurtleWA
07-28-2017, 12:49 PM
Do you count CD players, cassette tapers or even grammophones into this too, Turtle WA?

I was thinking anything that takes electricity or batteries. Are gramophones wind-up? They could be fine. CD players no.

IndigoErth
07-28-2017, 12:55 PM
Prob do stuff I'd been meaning to get to but weren't priority.

I don't watch much tv, I don't own a smartphone and don't spend half the day glued to one... but if I can't have my internet and computer, now that would suck. At the very least, the computer sans internet would at least let me again work on some stuff I've put off.

MsMarvelDuckie
07-28-2017, 07:49 PM
Read a lot, play D&D, write, or listen to music. Work on a few hobbues or projects.

Prowler
07-28-2017, 08:48 PM
Clean the house I guess
Bingo :lol:

People still go camping as adults?

I've never gone camping in my life. Doesn't look appealing to me, tbh.

CyberCubed
07-28-2017, 09:49 PM
I've never gone camping either but I live in a city, I guess that's a country or southern thing? I mean there's not much places to go camping here unless I got upstate.

Also the idea of sleeping in a tent in the woods with bugs, beavers, wolves, or bears creeping around, eating your food, going over you while you're sleeping and possibly killing you...this in no way sounds appealing. We don't live in the Wild West anymore, I see this in movies all the time where people sleep by campfires and get attacked by bandits or bears or some nonsense.

This isn't the aborigines!

Andrew NDB
07-28-2017, 09:51 PM
I would go insane if I didn't at least spend a few days every year in the deep woods, without any electronics or cell phone signal. Your mind and body, like, reboot. Very refreshing. Plus when you come back, it's all, "Whoaa, bunch of stuff happened to catch up on."

Prowler
07-28-2017, 09:57 PM
I've never gone camping either but I live in a city, I guess that's a country or southern thing? I mean there's not much places to go camping here unless I got upstate.

Also the idea of sleeping in a tent in the woods with bugs, beavers, wolves, or bears creeping around, eating your food, going over you while you're sleeping and possibly killing you...this in no way sounds appealing. We don't live in the Wild West anymore, I see this in movies all the time where people sleep by campfires and get attacked by bandits or bears or some nonsense.

This isn't the aborigines!
Dunno how it is there, but here I associate camping with the boy scouts and something people do at music festivals that last for a few days.

TurtleWA
07-28-2017, 10:35 PM
Camping is not always in tents. It is a way to save on money when traveling also. You can prepare most of your own meals and no pricey hotels. Save the funds for experiences and souvenirs.

Andrew NDB
07-28-2017, 10:59 PM
I've never gone camping either but I live in a city, I guess that's a country or southern thing? I mean there's not much places to go camping here unless I got upstate.

Also the idea of sleeping in a tent in the woods with bugs, beavers, wolves, or bears creeping around, eating your food, going over you while you're sleeping and possibly killing you...this in no way sounds appealing. We don't live in the Wild West anymore, I see this in movies all the time where people sleep by campfires and get attacked by bandits or bears or some nonsense.

This isn't the aborigines!

Where we go, there is no one and no campsites (we make our own) for many, many miles. And we have lots of guns.

ProphetofGanja
07-28-2017, 11:11 PM
Also the idea of sleeping in a tent in the woods with bugs, beavers, wolves, or bears creeping around, eating your food, going over you while you're sleeping and possibly killing you...this in no way sounds appealing

lmao don't fear the beaver, Cubed



But yeah, the best part about camping is getting away from it all. Camping in a crowded area pretty much defeats the whole purpose; that's not camping, that's just staying at an outdoor hotel. You want to be somewhere where you can forget about civilization, see a pristine night sky. Ideally you would have good friends and party favors with you, too.

TurtleWA
07-28-2017, 11:28 PM
lmao don't fear the beaver, Cubed



But yeah, the best part about camping is getting away from it all. Camping in a crowded area pretty much defeats the whole purpose; that's not camping, that's just staying at an outdoor hotel. You want to be somewhere where you can forget about civilization, see a pristine night sky. Ideally you would have good friends and party favors with you, too.

Don't forget the guitars and banjos. No camping trip is complete without them.

Uzae_SqbmDE


Playing guitar is actually a hobby I'd like to pick back up if I didn't spend so much time online. :lol:

plastroncafe
07-28-2017, 11:29 PM
Where we go, there is no one and no campsites (we make our own) for many, many miles. And we have lots of guns.

So many of the reasons I don't Camp, so neatly compacted in one comment.

ProphetofGanja
07-28-2017, 11:35 PM
Don't forget the guitars and banjos. No camping trip is complete without them.

Uzae_SqbmDE


Playing guitar is actually a hobby I'd like to pick back up if I didn't spend so much time online. :lol:

At this point in my life I think I'd rather stick a power drill in my ear :lol:

Don't get me wrong, I love guitar, even acoustic (though not as much as electric), but I hate that in certain situations there's always that one guy who won't stop noodling around on the guitar when he isn't nearly as good as he thinks he is. I'd rather just have quiet.

But call me a hypocrite I guess, because I will get the **** down in a communal drum circle :lol:

MsMarvelDuckie
07-28-2017, 11:47 PM
I spent so many years growing up going on weekend or summer camping trips with my folks. First in tents then later in an RV. My parents are fishing and motorcycling nuts so we were usually camped at parks that featured those activities. Where we camped, the chances were greater of falling off the bike and breaking bones, or falling out of the boat and drowning than getting mauled by a bear. Not that there are even any wild bears in Texas anyway..... I've crossed the Rio Grande on a four-wheel ATV with muddy water up to my knees, and jumped sand dunes in an Oklahome desert, or climbed to the top of a mountain on the same ATV in New Mexico or in Colorado in the back of a jeep to the tip of Pike's Peak on those trips. We've spent whole weekends fishing and swimming at a dozen different lakes around our area. Honestly the most dangerous thing most campers face is the possibility of heat exhaustion, sunburn, or snake bite.

MsMarvelDuckie
07-28-2017, 11:54 PM
But call me a hypocrite I guess, because I will get the **** down in a communal drum circle :lol:


You ain't the only one! I enjoy a good drum circle myself! It's how I got together with Mr D in fact- belly dancing and flirting with him while he was drumming at a weekly circle.

DestronMirage22
07-28-2017, 11:57 PM
I was very late in the game when it came to the internet. I just barely started a few years ago. So I could get along fine without it.

I've always had video games and have always played them constantly, so it would be kinda annoying to not have any, but I could manage as long as I had something else to do.

What I could do is read. A LOT. Ever since I could read, it's been a big hobby of mine. I've dedicated countless hours of my life reading all kinds of books. So, during that hypothetical week, I'd be in book paradise! I'd read all kinds of comics, novels, manga, etc.

Also, I would draw a lot too. Maybe then I'd actually get any good. :lol:

CyberCubed
07-29-2017, 12:19 AM
Where we go, there is no one and no campsites (we make our own) for many, many miles. And we have lots of guns.

So what do you do about bathrooms? Do people literally crap in the woods like a wild animal? I hope you guys at least pack toilet paper.

Andrew NDB
07-29-2017, 12:26 AM
So what do you do about bathrooms? Do people literally crap in the woods like a wild animal? I hope you guys at least pack toilet paper.

Usually find a log the right size to sit over and poo over the back of it. A roll or two of TP is brought, of course. Barring that, we're usually by a river... stand in it, it all kind of sorts itself out.

MsMarvelDuckie
07-29-2017, 12:29 AM
Don't worry Cubed it's not that bad. Done that myself a few times when roughing it. And you're fine as long as you know what leaves NOT to use lol! No different than using a urinal for most guys- though a bit more awkward for us ladies.....

Splinter the boss
07-29-2017, 06:26 AM
Read comics and sleep.

IndigoErth
07-29-2017, 02:48 PM
I've never gone camping either but I live in a city, I guess that's a country or southern thing? I mean there's not much places to go camping here unless I got upstate.

Also the idea of sleeping in a tent in the woods with bugs, beavers, wolves, or bears creeping around, eating your food, going over you while you're sleeping and possibly killing you...this in no way sounds appealing. We don't live in the Wild West anymore, I see this in movies all the time where people sleep by campfires and get attacked by bandits or bears or some nonsense.

This isn't the aborigines!
lol You are definitely a city boy.

I dunno, I think actually going somewhere a ways from home is kind of the point though. To get away from everything. It's a vacation... but not one dependent on luxuries.



I've only camped somewhat just once for a couple of days. Assateague Island campground in Maryland... Highly recommend it. Would gladly go back, though I'd prefer to take a little camper, not a tent like last time. Fun, but that sand the tent was set up in is surprisingly hard when you intend to sleep on it. (I ended up buying a little canvas raft the next day for a makeshift air mattress. That helped a lot.)

But going to sleep listening to the ocean because each loop of camp spots is right behind the dunes; the wild ponies (large ponies, or small horses if you will) and small deer that wander the area and might run into them - including the pony that showed up nearby the first night (the only close one we saw) when we were eating dinner at the picnic table we were fortunate to have at our spot, and the deer that showed up just a few feet behind me the last morning, clearly summoned by my rustling chip bags and hoping for handouts; and the boardwalk of Ocean City, MD not far from there to spend part of the day at...

Awesome.

Though we also sat through a thunderstorm in the tent the first night. Prob not the safest thing as this is a flat island and we prob aught to have gotten in the cars instead, but it was fun... if you like storms.

There were was also a restroom for each loop which was nice, so it wasn't entirely roughing it. Now... could I do REAL roughing it camping in a tent in some woods or whatever... eh, yeah, I dunno about that. lol Visit, sure, sleep there, not so sure.

CyberCubed
07-29-2017, 03:49 PM
lol You are definitely a city boy.


Well yeah, I'm a city slicker. I don't know anything about this country, camping, or farmhouse stuff. If I don't see a bunch of buildings close together I feel like I'm in another universe.

Sometimes when I go down to Florida it creeps me out with the large stretches of land with nothing in them. I feel like I'm in the foreign legion or something. I've never been to another country either, so I imagine I'd be in for quite the culture shock.

snake
07-29-2017, 03:59 PM
Nobody tell him they have cities outside of America.

IndigoErth
07-29-2017, 04:27 PM
That's like the complete opposite of people who are afraid of confined spaces.

Areas of wide open stretches of flat Midwestern (or FL?) land = https://media2.giphy.com/media/ZFFB6KD65wWME/100.gif ? Actually I guess that really is a thing.



I prefer coastal living, mostly suburbs, though the midwest is okay. I think the ONLY thing that would drive me nuts is one (or more) of the cicada species that live in part of it. People must tune those buggers out. :lol:

I'm so used to ours that just go up in sound slowly getting louder, hold the volume for a moment, then slowly back down in volume, then done. Ones I heard in part of Kansas (grandparents originally from there so my mom was telling me the cicadas were crazy there) were all up-down-up-down-up-down -- eeee-EEEE-eeee-EEE-eeee-EEEE-eeee-EEE-eeee-EEEE-eeee-EEEE... omg make it stop. :tlol: No. No, thank you.


edit: You seen this one, Cubed?

EhdA8OsawbE

ProphetofGanja
07-29-2017, 05:02 PM
Well yeah, I'm a city slicker. I don't know anything about this country, camping, or farmhouse stuff. If I don't see a bunch of buildings close together I feel like I'm in another universe.

Sometimes when I go down to Florida it creeps me out with the large stretches of land with nothing in them. I feel like I'm in the foreign legion or something. I've never been to another country either, so I imagine I'd be in for quite the culture shock.

You gotta get out on a Walter Mitty type trip my dude

BubblyShell22
07-29-2017, 05:17 PM
I would read books since I enjoy doing that anyway and I would write too. I don't go online as much as I used to and feel it's not necessary to have it to live. I only watch TV at night and sometimes during the day if there's anything on. I don't think my dad would survive because that's all he does is watch TV. Then again, he really doesn't have anything else to do besides that.

MsMarvelDuckie
07-29-2017, 06:15 PM
lol You are definitely a city boy.

I dunno, I think actually going somewhere a ways from home is kind of the point though. To get away from everything. It's a vacation... but not one dependent on luxuries.

I've only camped somewhat just once for a couple of days. Assateague Island campground in Maryland... Highly recommend it. Would gladly go back, though I'd prefer to take a little camper, not a tent like last time. Fun, but that sand the tent was set up in is surprisingly hard when you intend to sleep on it. (I ended up buying a little canvas raft the next day for a makeshift air mattress. That helped a lot.)

But going to sleep listening to the ocean because each loop of camp spots is right behind the dunes; the wild ponies (large ponies, or small horses if you will) and small deer that wander the area and might run into them - including the pony that showed up nearby the first night (the only close one we saw) when we were eating dinner at the picnic table we were fortunate to have at our spot, and the deer that showed up just a few feet behind me the last morning, clearly summoned by my rustling chip bags and hoping for handouts; and the boardwalk of Ocean City, MD not far from there to spend part of the day at...

Awesome.

Though we also sat through a thunderstorm in the tent the first night. Prob not the safest thing as this is a flat island and we prob aught to have gotten in the cars instead, but it was fun... if you like storms.

There were was also a restroom for each loop which was nice, so it wasn't entirely roughing it. Now... could I do REAL roughing it camping in a tent in some woods or whatever... eh, yeah, I dunno about that. lol Visit, sure, sleep there, not so sure.


You've been to Assateague? Cool! I've always wanted to see it. Misty of Chincoteague was one of my favorite books growing up, and seeing the wild ponies there and maybe getting to see Pony Penning Day (if they still do that) is something I'd love to do.


Well yeah, I'm a city slicker. I don't know anything about this country, camping, or farmhouse stuff. If I don't see a bunch of buildings close together I feel like I'm in another universe.

Sometimes when I go down to Florida it creeps me out with the large stretches of land with nothing in them. I feel like I'm in the foreign legion or something. I've never been to another country either, so I imagine I'd be in for quite the culture shock.


You would go positively nuts here in Texas then. Farmland and hilly plains everywhere. And woodsy wildlands too. Yes we have big cities but they are far apart- it's an 80+ mile drive from my home town growing up to get to Dallas, and that is the nearest "big city" of the kind you mean. Fort Worth is further rhan that- though I currently live closer to it than Dallas. Both are pretty big, but are surrounded by small suburbs and vast farm and ranchland areas.


That's like the complete opposite of people who are afraid of confined spaces.

Areas of wide open stretches of flat Midwestern (or FL?) land = https://media2.giphy.com/media/ZFFB6KD65wWME/100.gif ? Actually I guess that really is a thing.

I prefer coastal living, mostly suburbs, though the midwest is okay. I think the ONLY thing that would drive me nuts is one (or more) of the cicada species that live in part of it. People must tune those buggers out. :lol:

I'm so used to ours that just go up in sound slowly getting louder, hold the volume for a moment, then slowly back down in volume, then done. Ones I heard in part of Kansas (grandparents originally from there so my mom was telling me the cicadas were crazy there) were all up-down-up-down-up-down -- eeee-EEEE-eeee-EEE-eeee-EEEE-eeee-EEE-eeee-EEEE-eeee-EEEE... omg make it stop. :tlol: No. No, thank you.

edit: You seen this one, Cubed?

EhdA8OsawbE


Lol yeah we mostly tune them out. Or just sit outside in the evenings and listen to them in summer. We get the ones you were talking about here. They are big suckers too! Bright green with metallic gold sheen on the head and wings. Pretty, but alien-looking. The call is just like you described it. But it's fairly constant so it is just background noise after a few minutes.

Katie
07-29-2017, 08:06 PM
I live in a fairly urban to suburban area and I still have deer ....and coyotes and owls singing all night...and treefrogs. Those are loud. And we have cicadas. I don't even pay attention to them.

I LOVE camping. And sleeping outside. I'd be fine without tech for a week.

GoldMutant
07-29-2017, 08:14 PM
After I plan out with my friends, I'd probably do these:


Go for a hike/nature walk
Read (easy cop out, I know)
Maybe travel to another state and sight see
End it all with a big party


There's probably more, but these are the major examples I'd do, especially the big party. :D

Shark_Blade
07-29-2017, 08:22 PM
Read
Marathon Run (I normally do 10km/day. So add some more to that)
Swim
Run some more

ssjup81
07-30-2017, 06:56 AM
Go insane because I wouldn't be able to talk to my family. Also, my books are electronic these days.

Original TMNT Cartoon Fan
07-30-2017, 11:16 AM
I was thinking anything that takes electricity or batteries. Are gramophones wind-up? They could be fine. CD players no.

Early-20th century gramophones were wind-up.

Lisardo
08-31-2017, 09:24 AM
Like others have mentioned, I usually go camping as well. I actually go quite often, over the weekends and what not. The Pacific Northwest is like a camper's and hiker's paradise...so many beautiful areas to see! My boyfriend and I find that tent camping is also very affordable for us, and it allows us to explore and travel. We're also very outdoorsy and we have a crap ton of gear and multiple tents! Oneday when we can afford it, we'd like to get a camper, or at least get a VW Westfalia or camper van of some sort, but we'd probably still use our tents too.

We go to our usual spots but also try to hit areas we've never been to. Let's see...this summer sofar we've camped twice by Hood Canal, then we camped at Bumping Lake twice (by Mt Rainier), last week we camped overnight on the Pacific Coast, and then next month we'll be doing our BIG summer camping trip that we do every year, and we'll be going to Idaho near Hells Canyon! Looking forward to that! Never been to Hells Canyon or explored enough of Idaho. Even Oregon we've only seen so much of, mostly the coast, and also Crater Lake. Last year we took our big summer trip down to northern California and did some coast camping, forest camping, and even camped along the Oregon Dunes on the way back up to Seattle.

It is fun to camp if you don't mind doing without some modern conveniences (although we have a bit of a workaround with that), and have an adventurous side. But it's not for everyone, as I see some people posting about. I like Jim Gaffigan's take on it, as he's also a non-camper, lol!

ZdqIpYhM6PE

mrmaczaps
08-31-2017, 03:41 PM
If I had a full 7 days with no outside interaction.... I'd get my comics sorted and probably end up stuck, sitting on the floor surrounded by 10k comics and not be able to get out for another week.... :lol: :lol:

TurtleWA
08-31-2017, 05:49 PM
Like others have mentioned, I usually go camping as well. I actually go quite often, over the weekends and what not. The Pacific Northwest is like a camper's and hiker's paradise...so many beautiful areas to see! My boyfriend and I find that tent camping is also very affordable for us, and it allows us to explore and travel. We're also very outdoorsy and we have a crap ton of gear and multiple tents! Oneday when we can afford it, we'd like to get a camper, or at least get a VW Westfalia or camper van of some sort, but we'd probably still use our tents too.

We go to our usual spots but also try to hit areas we've never been to. Let's see...this summer sofar we've camped twice by Hood Canal, then we camped at Bumping Lake twice (by Mt Rainier), last week we camped overnight on the Pacific Coast, and then next month we'll be doing our BIG summer camping trip that we do every year, and we'll be going to Idaho near Hells Canyon! Looking forward to that! Never been to Hells Canyon or explored enough of Idaho. Even Oregon we've only seen so much of, mostly the coast, and also Crater Lake. Last year we took our big summer trip down to northern California and did some coast camping, forest camping, and even camped along the Oregon Dunes on the way back up to Seattle.

It is fun to camp if you don't mind doing without some modern conveniences (although we have a bit of a workaround with that), and have an adventurous side. But it's not for everyone, as I see some people posting about. I like Jim Gaffigan's take on it, as he's also a non-camper, lol!

ZdqIpYhM6PE

I wonder if Hells Canyon is worthy of its name? You will have to let us know. Jim Gaffigan had some funny lines in that. :lol:

Andrew NDB
08-31-2017, 07:40 PM
Like others have mentioned, I usually go camping as well. I actually go quite often, over the weekends and what not. The Pacific Northwest is like a camper's and hiker's paradise...so many beautiful areas to see! My boyfriend and I find that tent camping is also very affordable for us, and it allows us to explore and travel. We're also very outdoorsy and we have a crap ton of gear and multiple tents! Oneday when we can afford it, we'd like to get a camper, or at least get a VW Westfalia or camper van of some sort, but we'd probably still use our tents too.

We go to our usual spots but also try to hit areas we've never been to. Let's see...this summer sofar we've camped twice by Hood Canal, then we camped at Bumping Lake twice (by Mt Rainier), last week we camped overnight on the Pacific Coast, and then next month we'll be doing our BIG summer camping trip that we do every year, and we'll be going to Idaho near Hells Canyon! Looking forward to that! Never been to Hells Canyon or explored enough of Idaho. Even Oregon we've only seen so much of, mostly the coast, and also Crater Lake. Last year we took our big summer trip down to northern California and did some coast camping, forest camping, and even camped along the Oregon Dunes on the way back up to Seattle.

It is fun to camp if you don't mind doing without some modern conveniences (although we have a bit of a workaround with that), and have an adventurous side. But it's not for everyone, as I see some people posting about. I like Jim Gaffigan's take on it, as he's also a non-camper, lol!

ZdqIpYhM6PE

Tell me you guys are taking a gun with you on these deep camping trips.

Lisardo
09-01-2017, 09:43 AM
I wonder if Hells Canyon is worthy of its name? You will have to let us know. Jim Gaffigan had some funny lines in that. :lol:

I dunno, never been there. I heard the river can be somewhat rough though. We may go white water rafting, but I've never done that so I'm a twee scared, lol! Sure, I can give a review after our trip! Yeah, Gaff is rather funny in this one, because some of the stuff he mentions is very true!

Tell me you guys are taking a gun with you on these deep camping trips.

Lol, no we don't! Don't listen to Gaff - it isn't THAT dangerous to camp that you need guns! Though if you're doing true wilderness type camping, take care in where you store your food (animals and bears). We don't always do remote camping, usually not actually. We usually go to campgrounds but we're very picky about the kind of campgrounds we go to. We'll do state parks sometimes if that's all that's available in that area (such as the Pacific Coast recently), but it's costlier per night; at around $25 - $45 per night depending on the site (even if it's just a primative tent site). Typically we choose national service forest type campgrounds out in the forests/mountains. Those kind of campgrounds are only like $10 - $18/night, and some have more amenities than others (some have flush toilets while some only have pit toilets; some have running water spigots while others don't [dry camp - bring your own water or filter it from a stream]).

We have occasionally backpacked but damn it's a lot of work and MUCH more planning is involved! We have done "dispersed car camping", meaning you drive along a US forest service road for a ways, and when the road becomes more gravely you'll oftentimes find already-existing campsites, complete with a rock-surrounded, primitive firepit. No bathroom or picnic table though (potty in the woods and bring your own folding table/chairs). These sites are made by the US Forest Service and are completely free. For primitive, low - no cost campsites like that, you can also find them here: https://freecampsites.net/

Andrew NDB
09-01-2017, 09:56 AM
Lol, no we don't! Don't listen to Gaff - it isn't THAT dangerous to camp that you need guns!

Bullsh**.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/black-bear-attack-campers-head-colorado-spd/

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bear-attack-kills-camper-daniel-ward-o-connor-near-mackenzie-b-c-1.3069202

http://www.denverpost.com/2017/07/14/bear-killed-ward-human-dna/

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128833170

http://www.oregonlive.com/today/index.ssf/2017/06/bear_kills_runner_who_texted_t.html

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/08/03/the-true-story-of-two-fatal-grizzly-bear-attacks-that-changed-our-relationship-with-wildlife/?utm_term=.5b2b81a0260d

More often than not you'll be OK... until the one time you're not. Are you guys just going to campgrounds with other campsites with lots of people around, or all by yourselves far in?

Lisardo
09-01-2017, 10:11 AM
Bullsh**.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/black-bear-attack-campers-head-colorado-spd/

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bear-attack-kills-camper-daniel-ward-o-connor-near-mackenzie-b-c-1.3069202

http://www.denverpost.com/2017/07/14/bear-killed-ward-human-dna/

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128833170

http://www.oregonlive.com/today/index.ssf/2017/06/bear_kills_runner_who_texted_t.html

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/08/03/the-true-story-of-two-fatal-grizzly-bear-attacks-that-changed-our-relationship-with-wildlife/?utm_term=.5b2b81a0260d

More often than not you'll be OK... until the one time you're not. Are you guys just going to campgrounds with other campsites with lots of people around, or all by yourselves far in?


Well as I explained in my last post, usually we go to campgrounds. As for bear attacks, let's think of it this way - there's always sharks in the water and there's always a risk of a shark encounter or attack if you swim/surf in the ocean. But as you just said, more often than not, there's no danger. Most animals fear humans. You get occasional instances of brave, fearless animals, who will attack people in the ocean/campgrounds, but it's not the typical behavior. Even the articles you posted, which I briefly skimmed thru, even said that "This is not typical bear behavior" or something like that. Which I firmly believe.

Hell, when we camped at Bumping Lake the first time this summer, we encountered an elk that was pretty close to our campsite! Was quite amazing actually! But it was not a threat, and we had no other animal threats. The worse we've encountered is raccoons getting into our stuff! So annoying! Esp. since the one time we left our food outside, it was in close (snap)-lidded bins! We've learned since then, and only store food in our car. Also, I think perhaps other campers in these instances you mention, may have left food outside overnight, which is a HUGE NO-NO!!! Those are what you call novice campers. Course bears could be smelling the food cooking at dinnertime, but still....in all the years I've camped we've never had any scares. Again, most animals aren't that fearless. I myself don't live in fear. I'm surprized you mentioned this actually, considering you yourself do more remote type camping, in which a bear encounter is much more likely.

Also if you're gonna be camping in bear country it's important to be "bear aware" and get all the facts about the area and bears and their activity of that area. When we did our big summer camping trip at Glacier Nat'l park in 2014, we knew it was bear country and that if you hike in there you need to wear bells to scare off any nearby bears. Also all the campgrounds in that area had bear food storage closets. Though one of the articles you linked did say that despite the bear closets, that one bear still raided the campground. Again, HIGHLY unusual for a bear to do, esp. in a highly populated campground!

Andrew NDB
09-01-2017, 10:21 AM
Well as I explained in my last post, usually we go to campgrounds. As for bear attacks, let's think of it this way - there's always sharks in the water and there's always a risk of a shark encounter or attack if you swim/surf in the ocean. But as you just said, more often than not, there's no danger. Most animals fear humans. You get occasional instances of brave, fearless animals, who will attack people in the ocean/campgrounds, but it's not the typical behavior. Even the articles you posted, which I briefly skimmed thru, even said that "This is not typical bear behavior" or something like that. Which I firmly believe.

Or it's a year with low food and they're starving and suddenly they see a fat human snack wander nearby. The point is... you never know.

Also if you're gonna be camping in bear country it's important to be "bear aware" and get all the facts about the area and bears and their activity of that area. When we did our big summer camping trip at Glacier Nat'l park in 2014, we knew it was bear country and that if you hike in there you need to wear bells to scare off any nearby bears.

Wearing bells? Wouldn't that alert the attention of mountain lions and cougars and the like? Better to have a shotgun locked and loaded with 8 slugs. Or at least some goddamn bear spray.

Lisardo
09-01-2017, 10:27 AM
Or it's a year with low food and they're starving and suddenly they see a fat human snack wander nearby.

Again, that's incredibly rare. You seem to be rather fearful of being attacked while camping. It's not as much of a threat/danger as you're picturing, and as the media leads you to believe. Take precautions, be bear aware, and usually you're fine.

Wearing bells? Wouldn't that alert the attention of mountain lions and cougars and the like? Better to have a shotgun locked and loaded with 8 slugs. Or at least some goddamn bear spray.

What I researched is that the bells alert the bears of your presence. What you DON'T want to do is happen upon a bear and surprize it. That's the theory anyway. They aren't perfect though, and not all types of bears respond to them the same way. The spray idea is a good idea, if we're hiking in a highly-populated area like Glacier again. Here in WA all you got is black bears and they aren't as aggressive as the brown bears of Montana. I'll admit, I was a bit more fearful myself camping and esp. hiking around Glacier (in Montana) after everything I heard about the bear problem there. But I still did it, and there were other hikers nearby so that put my mind at ease. Plus I was always looking out.

MsMarvelDuckie
09-01-2017, 02:06 PM
I will second all of what Lusardo said. Bears are by and large more afraid of humans than humans are of them. Reason being- humans in the woods often like to SHOOT at them. Or anything else in the woods for that matter. Animals know what guns sound like even if they never see one and they know to stay away from the odd two legged creatures who make that loud noise. It is normally only when a dumb human stumbles into the path of a bear or cougar without pryor notice that something bad happens. And I can assure you that if you happen upon one THAT close, chsnces are that shotgun or whatever wont do you any good because the animal will be on you before you could even bring it to bear. (Heh see what I did there?) Bears can run at up to 35 mph and cougars can leap 12 feet or more and run about 40 mph. In other words either is much faster than a human. If you are close enough for it to be a threat it will probably reach you before you can aim. Then all bets are off.

That said, most camping areas are too heavily trafficked for most animals to go near- barring the occasional enterprising raccoon coyote or skunk. Personally I'd be more concerned about skunks in the woods than anything else, since they have almost NO fear. (Why should they? Even bears will think twice about messing with one. And they WILL run AT you if they feel threatened- because, stink.) The only other REAL danger is snakes. They are often difficult to spot and unless you know which are venomous, it can be hard to tell the difference. They also like to hide in nooks and crevices, or sun themselves, and humans can easily blunder right into one. And most give no warning before striking- except rattlesnakes who at least have an "alarm" that goes off before THEY do.

plastroncafe
09-01-2017, 02:12 PM
Don't most bear encounters happen because people aren't careful with their own food, not because bears view people as walking steaks?

BubblyShell22
09-01-2017, 02:13 PM
I'd be wary of bears, but I would be more afraid of snakes than anything else because sometimes you don't know if they're venomous or not. At least with a bear, you know what it can do and prevent it at all costs. I've always heard if you've spotted a bear, make yourself look big.

MsMarvelDuckie
09-01-2017, 02:26 PM
Thing is, if you see a snake you only need to know one of two things. First is head shape. If it is spade(triangle) shaped head, it is a viper (ie rattler copperhead or moccassin in US) and therefore venomous. If not, look for the "red touch yellow" if it is banded. If it DOES("red touch yellow kill a fellow") then it is a coral snake which is venomous(and incidentally in the same family as cobras) if not it is a king or milk snake. Anything else you dont need to worry about. Of course if the first thing you see or hear is a bony bunch of knobs on the tail tip or a dry buzzing rattle sound, GTFO!!

TurtleWA
09-01-2017, 03:06 PM
I know someone that recently got Lyme disease from one day in the woods of Pennsylvania. Their experience so far sounds miserable. I would be more concerned about Lyme disease, zika and west nile over being super stressed about bears.

And don't forget about Sasquatch

Lisardo
09-01-2017, 03:36 PM
:roll:Don't most bear encounters happen because people aren't careful with their own food, not because bears view people as walking steaks?

Yeah, that's what I was saying earlier. I mean bears could smell cooking food and attack campers/a campground (like in one of the articles Andrew linked where a bear attacked a campground), but again it's VERY rare a bear would be that bold!!! And yes, usually animals get attracted when food is left out, but usually the only thing you're gonna attract is annoying raccoons or squirrels!

And now we're talking about snakes and ticks, :roll: What's funny is I picked up a snake at my campsite, though I knew it was a harmless garter snake. Again my attitude is if you're that afraid of going out into the woods, why not just go shoot yourself right now! I mean, there's risks in anything in life but take it from me, I consider myself pretty much an expert level camper here, who goes fairly frequently, and in all the MANY times I've camped (tent camped mind you), I've never been in any real danger, and that's also because I'm cautious about what I do and where I store food. Doesn't mean it couldn't happen, and if there's bear storage closets at your campground, take extra care where you store your food. But you'll be fine! TRUST ME! Also, the one or two times we went backpacking, you had to register at a local ranger station and you had to rent one of their bear canisters (required) so that all your food and scented toiletries the bears wouldn't smell (esp. since you don't have your car to store it in). And you had to keep the bear canister about 50 feet away from your campsite. That's just a precaution, but again it's for deep woods, wilderness camping. Your typical campground it's doubtful you're gonna run into bears.

BubblyShell22
09-02-2017, 06:26 AM
Thing is, if you see a snake you only need to know one of two things. First is head shape. If it is spade(triangle) shaped head, it is a viper (ie rattler copperhead or moccassin in US) and therefore venomous. If not, look for the "red touch yellow" if it is banded. If it DOES("red touch yellow kill a fellow") then it is a coral snake which is venomous(and incidentally in the same family as cobras) if not it is a king or milk snake. Anything else you dont need to worry about. Of course if the first thing you see or hear is a bony bunch of knobs on the tail tip or a dry buzzing rattle sound, GTFO!!

That's very good advice, Duckie. But I'm the type to just get out no matter what kind of snake it is because I'm terrified of them.

Only times we camped were in Disney World and Cedar Point. We also camped at a place called Broken Arrow in Winamac, IN.