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MikeandRaph87
08-14-2017, 07:56 PM
I am starting up another degree and have an assignment which I have to incorporate five subjects into an integrated lesson plan. We have to chose a work of literature in which to base it all upon. I chose to base it a around the Grapes of Wrath,but I have come to one stumbling block. Does anyone on the Techndorme have any ideas how I can incorporate science with The Grapes of Wrath? I know there are plenty of fellow teachers around. Thanks for any suggestions.

CylonsKlingonsDaleksOhMy
08-14-2017, 08:20 PM
I am starting up another degree and have an assignment which I have to incorporate five subjects into an integrated lesson plan. We have to chose a work of literature in which to base it all upon. I chose to base it a around the Grapes of Wrath,but I have come to one stumbling block. Does anyone on the Techndorme have any ideas how I can incorporate science with The Grapes of Wrath? I know there are plenty of fellow teachers around. Thanks for any suggestions.

The science of erosion and the dust bowl?

Social science related to the people and devolution of previous period social structures?

Utrommaniac
08-14-2017, 08:22 PM
Depends on what you mean by "science". Do you mean technology? Biology? Physics? Chemistry?

Technology might be the most fitting.

I could see some kind of a steampunk/futuristic Grapes of Wrath, showing the "other side" of the "gleam and sparkle" of 21st century idea of futurism.

In the same way that there are the two different sides to the Depression era 30's. Between the boom of film and culture in the cities, and the suffering and misery of the farmers desperate and and unable to locate a new home for their work.

Likewise on the biology side, there are plenty of issues. What would be causing the migration to California/"California"? What would the stillbirth at the end of the story mean in "the future", in a time where that could ideally be averted far more than now or the 30's, even for the most poverty stricken?

plastroncafe
08-14-2017, 08:23 PM
My first thought went to the climate science that lead to the Dust Bowl in the first place, and then the agricultural stuff that went into how they got it under control.

Also I'm sure there's a public health aspect that'd be interesting to go into.

MikeandRaph87
08-14-2017, 08:30 PM
Depends on what you mean by "science". Do you mean technology? Biology? Physics? Chemistry?

Technology might be the most fitting.

I could see some kind of a steampunk/futuristic Grapes of Wrath, showing the "other side" of the "gleam and sparkle" of 21st century idea of futurism.

In the same way that there are the two different sides to the Depression era 30's. Between the boom of film and culture in the cities, and the suffering and misery of the farmers desperate and and unable to locate a new home for their work.

Likewise on the biology side, there are plenty of issues. What would be causing the migration to California/"California"? What would the stillbirth at the end of the story mean in "the future", in a time where that could ideally be averted far more than now or the 30's, even for the most poverty stricken?


I need to incorporate English(Literature), History, Science( Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics and related sciences) and Math, and Arts ( Art or Music). I have a solid idea of where to go except for Science.

Utrommaniac
08-14-2017, 08:59 PM
Definately climate science. Given that soil disparity was driving farmers off their land. The dust bowl didn't help either, but I don't know if that was before or after GOW.

And as stated before, there's quite a bit of medical science. Again, the stresses of the journey causing a rather young woman's pregnancy to end in a stillbirth, for instance. Lack of food, lack of sleep, lack of sanitation, high stress, her age (18 ), all the dust she would have been breathing in...there's quite a lot to factor in with that alone.

MikeandRaph87
08-14-2017, 09:17 PM
Definately climate science. Given that soil disparity was driving farmers off their land. The dust bowl didn't help either, but I don't know if that was before or after GOW.

And as stated before, there's quite a bit of medical science. Again, the stresses of the journey causing a rather young woman's pregnancy to end in a stillbirth, for instance. Lack of food, lack of sleep, lack of sanitation, high stress, her age (18 ), all the dust she would have been breathing in...there's quite a lot to factor in with that alone.

I did not realize Roseof Sharon was only 18. I was assuming mid 20s'.

Okay, so perhaps a written assignment based around the effects on the human body. That is a good idea,but can you further that into a better worded manner than I just did and maybe a little more elaborated.:)

Utrommaniac
08-14-2017, 09:34 PM
Okay, she's actually 19, I just checked. And the topic of a stillbirth could tie into multiple other conditions, which I'll put in bold.

Which is the first step in the problems of her stillbirth at the end of the story.

For most 19 year old mothers, stillbirths would be rare, even during the Great Depression...if they're healthy and relatively unstressed.

But Rose of Sharon was going on a long journey in a crowded truck, with little to eat for food and water. Which is problem number one that would cause it. So malnutrition and dehydration would be hugely impactful. And the family knew this, so their search for food was significantly more desperate...fearing an unwell baby, not a dead one. Her starvation is credited toward the baby's death in the text itself. But she's not starved so completely that she's not able to lactate - which comes in good fortune when she comes to the starving man's rescue.

Stress and poor hygiene would come packed together when travelling a dusty road with multiple family members, including one that was dying. And then the ultimate stress: being abandoned by her brother and her husband.

Malnutrition and its effects on the Joad family as a whole could be a scientific topic to cover in and of itself, but from the "symbolism" of the story, how it impacts Rose of Sharon would probably be the best focus.

MikeandRaph87
08-14-2017, 10:01 PM
Okay, she's actually 19, I just checked. And the topic of a stillbirth could tie into multiple other conditions, which I'll put in bold.

Which is the first step in the problems of her stillbirth at the end of the story.

For most 19 year old mothers, stillbirths would be rare, even during the Great Depression...if they're healthy and relatively unstressed.

But Rose of Sharon was going on a long journey in a crowded truck, with little to eat for food and water. Which is problem number one that would cause it. So malnutrition and dehydration would be hugely impactful. And the family knew this, so their search for food was significantly more desperate...fearing an unwell baby, not a dead one. Her starvation is credited toward the baby's death in the text itself. But she's not starved so completely that she's not able to lactate - which comes in good fortune when she comes to the starving man's rescue.

Stress and poor hygiene would come packed together when travelling a dusty road with multiple family members, including one that was dying. And then the ultimate stress: being abandoned by her brother and her husband.

Malnutrition and its effects on the Joad family as a whole could be a scientific topic to cover in and of itself, but from the "symbolism" of the story, how it impacts Rose of Sharon would probably be the best focus.


This is a good thought. I am going to meditate on it and let you know how it forms. I just got an 87 on a group project in which the professor stated an explanation of how grades were to be given was not mentioned when the rubric asked for the assignments themselves. A little on the pissy side in the quest for an in the degree's hardest course so I looking at all angles including here to gain it.

Utrommaniac
08-14-2017, 10:32 PM
Well, good luck on that!

I'm about to get to some of the hardest stuff in my course myself...and all three of those classes taking place on two days...