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-   -   Kickstarter: TMNT Action Figure Encyclopedia (http://forums.thetechnodrome.com/showthread.php?t=58465)

RaphaelinSTL 01-12-2019 12:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Deadman (Post 1788961)
So did this turn out to be one of those "take the money and run" type deals?

Man, I would like to think not ... but who knows at this point. Jay's been ghosting any texts I've sent and it looks like the last time he even logged in to Kickstarter was almost three months ago in October. Apparently there was a huge delay for his Air Jordan encyclopedia book too ... but still, enough time has passed now for some answers and updates.

fellowcello 01-12-2019 09:58 PM

I think it will eventually show up. But I don't even think I'll care when it does. Hype/excitement aside, I still expect a ton of typos and oversights just judging from the teases and Jay's communication.

I Crave Pizza No More 01-12-2019 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fellowcello (Post 1789038)
I think it will eventually show up. But I don't even think I'll care when it does. Hype/excitement aside, I still expect a ton of typos and oversights just judging from the teases and Jay's communication.

I share your concern about the typos, but always figured I'd be getting the book for the pictures more than anything.

IRMacGuyver 01-13-2019 12:43 PM

So is there any official word why it was canceled?

Cyrian 01-13-2019 03:59 PM

I'm just amazed that no one had already done this book. There are ones just like it for other toy lines like Transformers or GI Joe or Starwars. And they all did great jobs without kickstarter. I don't get how it's never happened for TMNT, unless Nickelodeon stomped down on them before they even started.

mikey0 01-13-2019 05:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cyrian (Post 1789135)
I'm just amazed that no one had already done this book. There are ones just like it for other toy lines like Transformers or GI Joe or Starwars. And they all did great jobs without kickstarter. I don't get how it's never happened for TMNT, unless Nickelodeon stomped down on them before they even started.

The 1977 Kenner Star Wars, 1982 Hasbro G.I. Joe, and even 1984 Hasbro Transformers lines were all iconic action figure lines based off of smash hit movies, cartoons, and best-selling toys from the years before. Each one of those lines resonate with adult collectors and vintage toy sellers. Properties like The Real Ghostbusters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers all had successful lines one to three years after programs for them premiered on television. The Jim Henson live-action movie was responsible for bringing the original Playmates toys from number three on the most wanted toys for Christmas in 1989 to number one in 1990; not the cartoon.

I, like most toy fans, would much rather see a Masters of the Universe Action Figure Encyclopedia than a TMNT Action Figure Encyclopedia. And I think it’s safe to say there won’t be a ‘Wicked Sweet 90s Toys’ book by Mark Bellomo in the future either. 90s collectibles do not click with true action figure or pop culture lovers the way that trinkets from the 80s do. While we were living in the ‘90s, it seemed like every toy maker was going overboard with bulky, cartoony, muscular, extremely detailed, colorful, slightly poseable and gimmicky action figures in new and old lines. I think adult toy collectors missed the simplicity of the lines made in the 60s, 70s, and 80s in the 1990s.

Besides, I have not ever met a TMNT fan or adult toy collector of all different kinds of sets that had that much of an affinity for the first Turtles line in general. Though, The Toy Scavanger from the UK has produced a VHS Toy Flash Back Pin Giftset for anyone interested. It’s here: https://www.thetoyscavenger.com/vhs-...res-4154-p.asp

I imagine The Ultimate Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Action Figure Encyclopedia would be akin to a Batman Action Figure Encyclopedia. There were so many renditions of the Turtles that some people asked for and others didn’t.

The Deadman 01-13-2019 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cyrian (Post 1789135)
I'm just amazed that no one had already done this book. There are ones just like it for other toy lines like Transformers or GI Joe or Starwars. And they all did great jobs without kickstarter. I don't get how it's never happened for TMNT, unless Nickelodeon stomped down on them before they even started.

There's this
https://www.amazon.com/Official-Teen...t+encyclopedia

Cyrian 01-13-2019 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikey0 (Post 1789143)
The 1977 Kenner Star Wars, 1982 Hasbro G.I. Joe, and even 1984 Hasbro Transformers lines were all iconic action figure lines based off of smash hit movies, cartoons, and best-selling toys from the years before. Each one of those lines resonate with adult collectors and vintage toy sellers. Properties like The Real Ghostbusters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers all had successful lines one to three years after programs for them premiered on television. The Jim Henson live-action movie was responsible for bringing the original Playmates toys from number three on the most wanted toys for Christmas in 1989 to number one in 1990; not the cartoon.

I, like most toy fans, would much rather see a Masters of the Universe Action Figure Encyclopedia than a TMNT Action Figure Encyclopedia. And I think it’s safe to say there won’t be a ‘Wicked Sweet 90s Toys’ book by Mark Bellomo in the future either. 90s collectibles do not click with true action figure or pop culture lovers the way that trinkets from the 80s do. While we were living in the ‘90s, it seemed like every toy maker was going overboard with bulky, cartoony, muscular, extremely detailed, colorful, slightly poseable and gimmicky action figures in new and old lines. I think adult toy collectors missed the simplicity of the lines made in the 60s, 70s, and 80s in the 1990s.

Besides, I have not ever met a TMNT fan or adult toy collector of all different kinds of sets that had that much of an affinity for the first Turtles line in general. Though, The Toy Scavanger from the UK has produced a VHS Toy Flash Back Pin Giftset for anyone interested. It’s here: https://www.thetoyscavenger.com/vhs-...res-4154-p.asp

I imagine The Ultimate Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Action Figure Encyclopedia would be akin to a Batman Action Figure Encyclopedia. There were so many renditions of the Turtles that some people asked for and others didn’t.

:lol: :roll:

Cyrian 01-13-2019 08:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Deadman (Post 1789162)

Ooohhhh that's good, thanks!

mikey0 01-13-2019 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Deadman (Post 1789162)

The Treasury was good for its’ time, but it is a retro item now. There are black and white pictures of rare items from the late ‘80s and very early ‘90s in the Treasury, but I think you’ll like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Collectibles by Matt MacNabb and Robert Barbieri better. It’s a pickle to find images from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Collectibles book online outside of the two pages featured on the CollectorBookStore website though.

DonnieLaForge 01-14-2019 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikey0 (Post 1789143)
Besides, I have not ever met a TMNT fan or adult toy collector of all different kinds of sets that had that much of an affinity for the first Turtles line in general.

You appear to be from the UK.
You also sound like you are probably 5-10 years older than me, or more.
You really need to understand that age has everything to do with what adults later have affinity for.
You also need to understand where you are at. You are on a forum likely mostly populated by people in the US, likely mostly adult collectors with an affinity for the first Turtles line.
Everything you've been saying lately in this thread and the other thread sounds like you came here to crap on everyone else's favorite hobby and reminisce about your own age group's favorite toys instead -- for that let me direct you over to he-man.org.
Maybe open up Instagram and discover there is a huge following of the original line right now, with people collecting the entire run, and with all of the mid 90's figures you loathe commanding much of the attention (because the earlier ones are so easy to get).
You appear to be VERY out of touch with the huge, huge nostalgia for TMNT in the US right now.
And when you say things like "the movie was responsible, not the cartoon" ... you sound pretty self-important. All this stuff works together. I can promise you, I loved the toon before the movie -- and then I loved the movie -- which made me love the toon more -- which made me love the movie more -- all of which made me love the toys more. TMNT fever mounted, rose, and subsided like all other fevers, and for those of us that had that fever, the original line is pretty much *our* definition of toys and action figures. In my opinion those lines you hold such high regard for are pretty boring compared to the turtles as far as toys go!

Now about this book....I have a lot of patience but I feel like I am coming near my breaking point. Not that I can do anything about it. But it's seriously time for this to show up at my door....

mikey0 01-14-2019 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonnieLaForge (Post 1789262)
You appear to be from the UK.
You also sound like you are probably 5-10 years older than me, or more.
You really need to understand that age has everything to do with what adults later have affinity for.
You also need to understand where you are at. You are on a forum likely mostly populated by people in the US, likely mostly adult collectors with an affinity for the first Turtles line.
Everything you've been saying lately in this thread and the other thread sounds like you came here to crap on everyone else's favorite hobby and reminisce about your own age group's favorite toys instead -- for that let me direct you over to he-man.org.
Maybe open up Instagram and discover there is a huge following of the original line right now, with people collecting the entire run, and with all of the mid 90's figures you loathe commanding much of the attention (because the earlier ones are so easy to get).
You appear to be VERY out of touch with the huge, huge nostalgia for TMNT in the US right now.
And when you say things like "the movie was responsible, not the cartoon" ... you sound pretty self-important. All this stuff works together. I can promise you, I loved the toon before the movie -- and then I loved the movie -- which made me love the toon more -- which made me love the movie more -- all of which made me love the toys more. TMNT fever mounted, rose, and subsided like all other fevers, and for those of us that had that fever, the original line is pretty much *our* definition of toys and action figures. In my opinion those lines you hold such high regard for are pretty boring compared to the turtles as far as toys go!

Now about this book....I have a lot of patience but I feel like I am coming near my breaking point. Not that I can do anything about it. But it's seriously time for this to show up at my door....

The basic figure template pretty much stayed the same for the 1977 Kenner Star Wars line, 1981 Mattel Masters of the Universe line, and 1982 Hasbro G.I. Joe line. That is a big part of what makes them so collectible to completists and non-completists of all ages. They’re action figure lines!

I do not mean to cause any discomfort to TMNT fans on here. It’s just that the original 1988 Playmates line was all over the place like the LEGO line has gotten to be in recent times. There were so many turtles variants in the 1988 line that children of the late 80s and 90s who loved the cartoon forgot about the multitude of toys targeted to them after a while and moved on completely. The mid and late ‘90s toys are better than anything on the market today, but ironically enough, they do not hold a candle to the mass produced toys of the 1988 Playmates line. I deeply apologize for this, but it made no sense whatsoever for there to be a Pizza Thrower and Pizza Tossin’ Turtles when the Fred Wolf, Archie Comics, and live-action movie turtles all enjoyed eating pizza. And since when did the turtles have time to dream of themselves as Warriors of the Forgotten Sewer, Star Trek characters, and Universal Monsters?!

The year 1990 is best remembered by pop culture fans for the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles film being the highest-grossing independent film at the time and ninth-highest-grossing film worldwide; not Fred Wolf Films winning the best cartoon category for the 1987 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon at the Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards from that year. The front cover to the 1990 Consumer Guide Turtle Power Unauthorized History Collectible Book and back cover to the 1991 The Official Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Treasury both give away how important the Jim Henson flick was to Turtles fans in the very early 1990s. In 1990, most consumers wanted the characters featured in the first live-action film and not Bebop, Rocksteady, or Genghis Frog. I guess you had to be there to know what I’m talking about. A large number of 1987 TMNT cartoon fans then had the whole set of characters from the syndicated animated series by mid 1990 (tops) to late ‘91.

The 1988 Playmates line is a cute and fun toy line to female and male toy buyers. The ‘88 line suffered from what the 1982 Hasbro G.I. Joe and 1984 Hasbro G1 Transformers lines before it did. All lines spanned into the 1990s!!! Each one of them ended in the 1990s. I must say the 1986 Kenner The Real Ghostbusters line cleaned up quite nicely before the line was cancelled in 1991. I wish the 1988 Playmates Turtles line had wrapped up in 1992 or 1993. It seriously went on for too long. I mean, come on, Stretch Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles?! In 1997?! One to two years after new releases for 1993 CAP Toys Stretch Armstrong were in stores?!

The original Playmates toys are great to act out scenes from the toons, comics, and movies with for almost an hour. Sadly, none of those toys, vehicles, and playsets have the play value of the 1983 Kenner Star Wars Return of the Jedi Ewok Village, 1985 Hasbro G.I. Joe USS Flagg Aircraft Carrier, 1986 Mattel MOTU Eternia Playset, or 1987 Hasbro G1 Transformers Fortress Maximus. Everything I mentioned in the last sentence made one time toy-obsessed children into the adult collectors of today. It’s really a shame that Playmates Toys never included the part of the sewer that the Technodrome was located in to go with their 1990 Technodrome playset. When a Mega Bloks Technodrome Set from 2016 is more spacious and in scale than the original 1990 playset from the 1988 toy line, you know you’re in trouble!

Getting back on subject, it would be nice to see a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Action Figure Encyclopedia for the 1988 to early 1991 Playmates toys. It’s cool that an encyclopedia is being made for the fans, but there should be one for picky toy collectors and sellers also. If my ideal encyclopedia did well, then others for the fall 1991 to early ‘94 and late 1994 to 1997 selections could be made. There are currently several unofficial TMNT collectors guides for the 1988 to 1990 collection and one for the 1991 to 1993 sets from the UK. None of them are eye grabbing like Mark Bellomo’s G1 Transformers Identification and Price Guide, The Ultimate Guide to Vintage Transformers Action Figures, and Totally Tubular 80s Toys books though. As of right now, The Virtual Ninja Turtles Museum is still the best place to get information on the original 1988 Playmates TMNT toy line.

Despite all of this huge nostalgia for all things Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles you speak of, passion for the original 1988 line does not appear to be anywhere. I think the original 1988 Playmates line is too messy to measure up to those action figure lines that are all boring to you. The 1988 Playmates TMNT line is not only the messiest toy line of the 1990s, but of all time thus far!!!! Seriously, the 2k3 Playmates line and 2012 Playmates lines stack up better than the first Playmates line from 1988. There were regular and giant sized Troll Turtles, for crying out loud!!! Troll Turtles!

I Crave Pizza No More 01-14-2019 03:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikey0 (Post 1789291)
There were regular and giant sized Troll Turtles, for crying out loud!!! Troll Turtles!

You take that back! I love those trolls! :trazz: (no, seriously, they're sitting on a little ledge in my basement)

mikey0 01-14-2019 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by I Crave Pizza No More (Post 1789298)
You take that back! I love those trolls! :trazz: (no, seriously, they're sitting on a little ledge in my basement)

The 13’’ Giant Trolls TMNT are a bit scary, but I’m sure the 6 1/8 Inches Troll Turtles in 1988 toy colors in the Classic Collection would sell better than the 1991 to 1993 variant reissues did in 2016. The re-released Turtle Troll weapons being the same color as the ones for the first wave turtles from 1988 would be an excellent bonus for TMNT fans and adult collectors who grew up in the mid ‘90s.

Roseangelo 01-14-2019 07:21 PM

Not sure of the ages of the people make the recent comments, but unless you lived it, it's hard to express what the TMNT phenomenon was like in the early 90s. All those crazy figures you have no nostalgia for exist because Playmates couldn't come up with new toys fast enough. TMNT was literally a whole aisle at TRU and it was all constantly selling out.

At the same time, you have Mirage and Playmates. Mirage has no experience licensing game and while Playmates had had moderate success with some other toy lines, it was nothing like this. So Mirage funneled toy ideas to Playmates and a lot of wacky stuff got made. And there was never a coherent strategy behind what got made, just "more, more, more."

Playmates also acquired the license for Star Trek, so they combined the two.

Trolls were also a huge fad, so they combined the two.

They are silly, but that's how the 90s were.

mikey0 01-14-2019 09:14 PM

The 1988 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles toy line is one of the longest running toy lines for boys in any time period. The advent of children’s programming block known to children of the 1990s as Fox Kids and the action figure lines that went with the shows on there were to the 1990s what 30 minute toy commercials and their respective toy lines were to the 1980s though. The Turtles could not be the best-selling toys during holiday seasons for every year of the 1990s. Even while we were in the early 90s, some adults saw the Turtles as an “80s thing”. It was time to move on towards the future before 1999 or so. The Playmates Turtles line was stuck in 1988 when action figures like the ones for The Real Ghostbusters, Battle Beasts, Super Naturals, and Silverhawks were all last acceptable as popular toys. Late 1988 to 1999 was the gaming age, so it was only a matter of time before digital toys like the 1991 Super Nintendo Entertainment System, 1992 Tiger Electronics Home Alone 2 TalkBoy, and 1996 Bandai Tamagotchi took over completely.

The original Playmates toy line seemed to evolve quite rapidly in the 1990s also. I’m with Original TMNT Cartoon Fan on this, toy buyers should have gotten more Archie Adventures comic book secondary characters from 1992 to 1997 instead of Troll Turtles, Dino Turtles, and Stretch TMNT toys. The Archie Adventures comic book influence on the original line should have been heavier when the 1990 CBS Saturday morning Fred Wolf series did not take off. But, because that never happened, toy lovers are restricted to two areas with the first toy line, take the whole 1988 toy line as it is or revisit the original toy line up to a point. I imagine it’s difficult for there to be a Star Wars Vintage Action Figures A Guide for Collectors, The Ultimate Guide to Vintage Star Wars Action Figures, or Plastic Crack A Beginners Guide To Vintage Star Wars Collecting book for TMNT toys. The Turtles were not ever really on anyone’s radar long enough to reach Kenner Original Star Wars, Mattel Original Masters of the Universe, or Hasbro G1 Transformers levels of dedication from fans and ordinary people. Most die hard pop culture fans and shellheads alike would much rather watch deleted scenes to the 1990 Jim Henson flick than go through an entire hardcover book for all things TMNT. I apologize deeply for this, but Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is not Star Wars, Barbie, G.I. Joe, or Transformers.

The creators of the TMNT lucked out because the ‘80s into the 1990s was the spoof age. Elderly adults were already taking jabs at the writer of the 1984 Mirage Comics comic book in the very late ‘80s and early 1990s. Turtlemania was a short lived craze in the US. The hype was not there for Secret of the Ooze in 1991 like it was for Empire Strikes Back in 1980. The Turtles were at one time America’s favorite wisecrackers in ‘89 and ‘90, but there was nothing to hold people’s interest in them past those years. At the time, some people thought of the turtles as actual superheroes and not spoofs of superheroes. Believe it or not, there are comic book stores that do not have copies from any comic book series for the Turtles. I’m sure some sellers are still asking who was the intended audience for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles products all these years later.

DonnieLaForge 01-15-2019 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikey0 (Post 1789388)
I apologize deeply for this, but Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is not Star Wars, Barbie, G.I. Joe, or Transformers.

You forgot to praise He-Man again.
But the point you are missing is that it doesn't have to be. Few things are Star Wars or Barbie. For a time, TMNT came close enough as to be what mattered most to a generation of boys (with apparently much better imaginations than you can imagine, as I played for much more than "an hour" and didn't even have the playset)... Now what nonsense is all this about tearing down this book? The world is big enough for all books, man. Let people live.

mikey0 01-15-2019 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonnieLaForge (Post 1789433)
You forgot to praise He-Man again.
But the point you are missing is that it doesn't have to be. Few things are Star Wars or Barbie. For a time, TMNT came close enough as to be what mattered most to a generation of boys (with apparently much better imaginations than you can imagine, as I played for much more than "an hour" and didn't even have the playset)... Now what nonsense is all this about tearing down this book? The world is big enough for all books, man. Let people live.

To shellheads, the Turtles are, in fact, Barbie and Star Wars. Non-shellheads do not see what elevates the Turtles to being something so memorable that TMNT fans have such dedication, investment, and love for this spoof of
short-running Marvel and DC Comics superheroes, of which not many ordinary consumers are familiar with at all. As you mentioned in this post I’m responding to, the Turtles toys only came close to be significant to a generation of boys for a time. The Nintendo Entertainment System and Super Nintendo Entertainment System held the interests of that generation of boys much longer than even one Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles toy in that era. In the very early 1990s, TMNT toys were going fast in stores, but mainly for display value and nothing else. The 1990s, to this day, are best remembered as the time of Nintendo. Whether you look back to the 1990s for the inventions first sold in the decade or the activities people regularly did in them, Nintendo is going to come up one way or another. That is not always the case for the Turtles, despite having the ninth highest grossing movie of 1990.

Does that mean there should be a The NES Encyclopedia (Every Game Released for the Nintendo Entertainment System) and not a TMNT Action Figure Encyclopedia? No, of course not. The NES Encyclopedia will be far more elusive though and not library reference book material like the TMNT Action Figure Encyclopedia. As exciting as it would be to glance inside of the TMNT Action Figure Encyclopedia, the awe would wear off rather quickly after a while. As I’m sure you have discovered, each different renditions of the Turtles speak to different generations of individuals. Not all versions of the Turtles appeal to casual toy and comic book buyers like they do to shellheads. And I’m sorry to say this, but a long withstanding passion is just not there for any one of the Turtles toy lines like it is for Barbie, Star Wars, G.I. Joe, Transformers, Nintendo, or even Masters of the Universe. Before you know it, the TMNT Action Figure Encyclopedia will be up for bid or sale online because none of the Turtles toys made from 1988 to 2017 help to stimulate the imagination of anyone but shellheads.

The Turtles were a one year phenomenon, whereas gaming, hunting down Star Wars collectibles, and owning Barbie merchandise are not. It’s as simple as that. The Jim Henson movie hit one year after the year of the cartoon, so the franchise was still standing tall. TMNT toys are “90s” to Baby Boomers who were parents and store clerks in the 1990s, but “80s” to children and teenagers of the early 1990s looking to get away from ‘the 80s side to the 90s’ and move towards the future. I believe that is another problem with the original toy line, sellers do not know which party to group them with. Were they 80s action figures or 90s action figures? The original Playmates line went on for too long.

TheMasterTurtle 01-15-2019 03:58 PM

Everyone is entitled to their opinion but I’m really failing to understand what purpose it serves for you to come here and try to prove that TMNT is lesser than all the franchises you prefer. The people here are here because they love tmnt. Not sure why you’re here other than boredom. Let’s assume one of your arguments are valid, you’re not in the right place to make said arguments. I’m a fan of a non tmnt franchise that barely anyone cares about or remembers but I don’t care that it doesn’t hold a candle to other 80s properties. Why should you care why all these people love tmnt and try to justify your preferences being better.

Just an FYI, tmnt was not a one year success story. That’s just being ignorant

mikey0 01-15-2019 05:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheMasterTurtle (Post 1789493)
Everyone is entitled to their opinion but I’m really failing to understand what purpose it serves for you to come here and try to prove that TMNT is lesser than all the franchises you prefer. The people here are here because they love tmnt. Not sure why you’re here other than boredom. Let’s assume one of your arguments are valid, you’re not in the right place to make said arguments. I’m a fan of a non tmnt franchise that barely anyone cares about or remembers but I don’t care that it doesn’t hold a candle to other 80s properties. Why should you care why all these people love tmnt and try to justify your preferences being better.

Just an FYI, tmnt was not a one year success story. That’s just being ignorant

Try to prove?! The Turtles have missed the National Toy Hall of Fame quite a few times already. The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were not even in the first or second seasons of Netflix’s The Toys That Made Us at all. Let me reiterate that. One of the longest running toy lines not in a recent web series on America's greatest toy franchises…Yet, I’m the only person who believes TMNT is lesser than the franchises that came before it?!

I like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles also, but everything from the original Playmates toy line to the 2017 2k12 Playmates line is a character toy, not an action figure!

Although the Turtles were on Christmas lists from 1989 to 1993, the character toys by Playmates Toys were never as big as they were in 1990. The novelty of the Turtles wore off with The Coming Out of Their Shells broadway show and the second movie, Secret of the Ooze. Despite the 1987 Fred Wolf cartoon gaining all of the attention it did in 1989, only one award went to Murakami Wolf Swenson in 1990 (Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Award for Favorite Cartoon).

I’m sincerely apologetic for my posts and for any offence that was taken.

While the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are best known for the 1987 syndicated cartoon series, many fans and non-fans alike see the 1990 Jim Henson turtles as the definitive turtles. The Turtles were, in fact, a one year success story because the 1990 movie sold the toys better than either one of the Fred Wolf cartoons. The Turtles are more of ‘a 1990 thing’ than 80s and 90s lovers would have you to believe. And that is a fact.


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