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Old 07-18-2017, 02:22 AM   #161
Powder
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Poor creatures.
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Old 11-11-2017, 12:46 PM   #162
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A definite trend in current events conversation:


". . . because the days are evil."
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Old 11-25-2017, 06:52 PM   #163
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A Japanese school forces a student to dye her hair black!

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Old 02-19-2018, 04:47 PM   #164
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Farting Passenger Forces Plane To Make Emergency Landing

Quote:
Sometimes plane travel really stinks.

A flight from Dubai to Amsterdam had to make an emergency landing in Vienna after a fight broke out because one of the passengers wouldn’t stop breaking wind.

The fart-induced fracas happened Feb. 11 aboard Transavia Airlines Flight HV6902 when two men sitting next to an apparently very flatulent man raised a stink about his repeated gas attacks, according to Fox News.

When the alleged perpetrator didn’t stop, his disgusted seatmates reportedly complained to the airline crew, who apparently did nothing.

Instead, the captain issued a warning to the two complainants, accusing them of noisy and aggressive behavior and making threats, according to the NL Times.

When the freedom-from-flatulence fighters wouldn’t stop griping about their fellow passenger, a fight broke out on the plane, according to the Dutch language newspaper De Telegraaf.

The pilots then made an emergency stop in Vienna and removed the complainants, but apparently not the farting man. Two women sitting in the same row as the angry men were also forced off the plane as well.

All four people reportedly shared Dutch and Moroccan ancestry, but the two women claim they were simply sitting in the same row as the men involved with the incident.

The women are now taking the Dutch budget airline to court, according to the Metro.

“We had nothing to do with the whole disturbance. We distance ourselves from that. Do they sometimes think that all Moroccans cause problems? That’s why we do not let it sit,” one of the women said, according to De Telegraaf. ”We had no idea who these boys were, we just had the bad luck to be in the same row and we didn’t do anything.”

“All I will say is that the crew were really provocative and stirred things up,” she added.

None of the passengers kicked off the plane were arrested because they had not broken any Austrian laws. However, they have been banned from flying Transavia Airlines in the future.

HuffPost reached out to Transavia Airlines, which did not immediately respond. The airline did offer this statement to De Telegraaf that was translated by the NL Times:

Our crew must ensure a safe flight. If passengers pose a risk, they immediately intervene. Our people are trained for that. They know very well where the boundaries are. Transavia therefore stands squarely behind the cabin crew and the pilots.

The airline has reportedly filed a police report about the incident in the Netherlands said it was “open to a conversation with these women.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/farting-p...185237663.html
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Old 10-09-2018, 11:03 AM   #165
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For this week only, you can now vote for your favorite, plus-sized cubs.
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Old 01-10-2019, 04:37 PM   #166
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So this is a hilarious one. Famed Megan Fox was in Norway last year filming Legends Of The Lost with Megan Fox. And someone apparently informed her that Norway got wolves.

So when she was on location she demanded armed guards! And that's a highly unusual demand to say the least, and of course there where no armed guards to hire, so the guy who owned the area they filmed in and his son had to bring along their rifles and just carried their ammo in their pockets

Wolves are a hot button topic in Norwegian politics, as anti-wolf groups want them extinct while pro-wolf groups wants to let the wolves have a liveable population as the wolf hunting quota is really high. And Megan was probably given some juicy misinformation about wolves and got scared. There hasn't been a wolf related death since 1800 in Norway.
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Old 01-11-2019, 12:01 AM   #167
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News is Fox insisted that co-star Taylor Lautner be shot on site.
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Old 01-11-2019, 11:29 AM   #168
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That is too funny... That girl is such a weird one.

Who even comes up with that or green lights it... Legends Of The Lost with Megan Fox. It sounds like a concept that only The Onion might concoct.
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Old 01-13-2019, 03:56 AM   #169
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haha yeah. She apparently also had a fuss that there was no toilets in the wilderness....

A friend of mine have seen the episode, it's was pretty solid. The theme was about the "recent" discovery that a large number of Norse graves where the dead person was buried with weapons where women.

The "recent" part is that more researchers actually starts to check the bones instead of "Weapon=a man" and that's it.
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Old 01-13-2019, 09:03 PM   #170
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. . . Everything in the wilderness is a toilet. . .
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:16 PM   #171
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Well... I'd at least avoid a hornet nest or patch of poison ivy. lol


Who the heck does a show like that or plans to spend any amount of time in the wilderness without even considering the basics like bathroom needs. I can understand that there are certain weeks as a woman when trying to deal with woman things sans bathrooms would be kind of an issue, but come on... think it through first, sister.
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Old 02-09-2019, 07:23 PM   #172
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Plaguing creatures for hundreds of millions of years? Hopefully a cure will one day be sweet revenge.

Quote:
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s...-paleontology/

'Ridiculously rare' case of cancer found in fossilized leg
A 240-million-year-old turtle was afflicted with a type of bone cancer resembling one that strikes hundreds of people each year.


By John Pickrell
PUBLISHED February 7, 2019

About 240 million years ago in what is now Germany, a turtle that hadn’t yet evolved a shell developed something much less fortuitous: a kind of bone tumor that afflicted one of its hind legs.

The fossilized tumor, described today in the journal JAMA Oncology, shows that even in the Triassic period, at around the time the first dinosaurs appeared, animals could be plagued with mutations in their DNA that led to cancer.

Cancer 101

What is cancer, and how does it start? Find out how genetics play a role, which types of cancer are the most prevalent, and what is being done to fight this deadly disease.

The find is exciting, because “cancer is ridiculously rare in the fossil record,” says study leader Yara Haridy, a paleontologist at Berlin’s Museum of Natural History. “Most cancers are in soft tissues, and although we can see sometimes evidence of soft tissue pathologies on [fossil] bone, cancer would be really hard to diagnose that way.” (Today, for example, a virus is causing sea turtles to suffer from life-threatening tissue tumors.)

The study team determined that the ancient growth was a kind of bone cancer called a periosteal osteosarcoma—one that “looks almost exactly like osteosarcoma in humans,” says coauthor Patrick Asbach, a medical doctor and radiologist at Berlin’s Charité University of Medicine. This specific type of bone cancer afflicts about 800 to 900 of the 3,450 or so people who are diagnosed with skeletal cancers each year in the U.S. today.

“It is interesting to see that the diseases we know quite well also appeared in extinct animals, and that we as humans are not the only ones who struggle with it,” Asbach says.

Missing link in turtle evolution

The shell-less turtle relative sporting the tumor, Pappochelys rosinae, was first revealed to the world in 2015. At the time, the Chihuahua-size species was hailed as the final piece in the puzzle showing how turtle shells evolved from flattened ribs and belly bones into the armored body boxes they are today.

Around 20 specimens of Pappochelys were discovered in 2008 at a limestone quarry near the town of Velberg, about 50 miles northeast of Stuttgart, Germany. The fossils have since been held at the State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart.

Among them was a thighbone with a puzzling growth that came to Haridy’s attention last summer. She then recruited Asbach to help conduct a micro-CT scan to look inside the fossil bone and see its internal structure, which allowed the team to determine the type of cancer involved.

While it’s impossible to know for sure if the cancer this turtle suffered from led to its demise, in human cases of osteosarcoma, it often spreads to the lungs.

“If it did spread to the lungs, it may have made the turtle less efficient in escaping or feeding, which could have ultimately caused its death,” Haridy speculates.

While it is relatively common to see pathologies in fossil bones, the majority are the result of traumatic injuries such as bites and breaks, says Steve Salisbury, a paleontologist at the University of Queensland in Australia who has researched infectious disease in T. rex fossils.

“Only rarely are we able to link pathologies in fossil vertebrates to known diseases,” adds Salisbury, who was not one of the study authors. “It would be interesting to compare the fossil bone with examples of similar cancers in modern turtles, assuming the ones that afflicted them in the Triassic still do today.” (Also see a fossil toe that holds the earliest known case of cancer in humans.)

Cancer’s very ancient origins

Scientists have found several other very ancient cancers in fossil fish and an amphibian, and a non-cancerous tumour in a slightly older mammal relative called a gorgonopsid. However, this new find is the earliest cancer ever discovered in an amniote, the group that includes reptiles, birds, and mammals.

The discovery of an osteosarcoma helps dispel a belief held by some experts that diseases change so much over time that “current disease manifestations cannot be used to recognize past afflictions,” says coauthor Bruce Rothschild, a professor of medicine at the University of Kansas and a research associate at the Carnegie Museum who has studied cancer in dinosaurs.

“Not only could cancer be recognized and the diagnosis confirmed, but it could even be diagnosed down to a specific variety.”

And while it is true that modern cancer-causing agents such as nicotine and alcohol can increase our chances of developing cancer, the discovery of a tumor from the Triassic adds to evidence that many of the cancers we have today and their associated genes are likely to have very ancient origins, the experts argue.

“We are not very different,” Rothschild says, “from all those with whom we share and have shared this planet.”
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